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The paras are the elite of the army and are on a par with the marines who are the elite of the navy. You could easily google this
Reply 2
Original post by CoolCavy
The paras are the elite of the army and are on a par with the marines who are the elite of the navy. You could easily google this


Yeah but I just wanted to know if infantry would match up to para or Royal marine training.
Reply 3
Original post by Efron
Which ones more physically intense in the British Army. And is Royal marine commando training comparable to infantry.

Many thanks

Feel like I'm repeating myself here... Because I am;
Original post by Drewski
Each is hard in different ways - because they're training for different things.

It's pointless and very childish to compare.

What's your goal here? What are you trying to do?
Reply 4
Original post by Drewski
What's your goal here? What are you trying to do?


I heard many people say that infantry training is lighter than paras, but I want to know the truth of whether it actually is.

Because I want a rigouras training program, but I'm scared of jumping out the plane so I would rather pass on paras, and join infantry, but I'm not sure if infantry would match up to the rigour.
(edited 4 years ago)
Reply 5
Original post by Efron
I heard many people say that infantry training is lighter than paras, but I want to know the truth of whether it actually is.

Because I want a rigouras training program, but I'm scared of jumping out the plane so I would rather pass on paras, and join infantry, but I'm not sure if infantry would match up to the rigour.

Kid, you can't even spell rigorous...

Do you even know what you want to do? The initial training for any of these things lasts weeks whereas you're considering a career that can last years. You're flitting between roles and services more often than some people change socks...

Pick the lifestyle and role you prefer and worry about the training later.
If you don't like the idea of jumping out of planes, then thinking about joining the Paras is pretty dumb, no?
Reply 6
Original post by Drewski
Kid, you can't even spell rigorous...

Do you even know what you want to do? The initial training for any of these things lasts weeks whereas you're considering a career that can last years. You're flitting between roles and services more often than some people change socks...

Pick the lifestyle and role you prefer and worry about the training later.
If you don't like the idea of jumping out of planes, then thinking about joining the Paras is pretty dumb, no?


That was a keyboard spasm, of course I know how to spell rigorous.
The parachute regiment is an infantry regiment. They train at ITC Catterick following a similar course with a bit extra cobbled on for them to prepare for and do P company.
Reply 8
Original post by moonkatt
The parachute regiment is an infantry regiment. They train at ITC Catterick following a similar course with a bit extra cobbled on for them to prepare for and do P company.


So is the training similar to infantry, excluding p company.
Reply 9
Son, in the nicest possible way, how do you expect to make the cut for the Paras if you don't like heights?

I personally would say go Royal Marines if that's what you're set on. The hardest course but in return you get:
A) Bragging rights
B) the opportunity to specialise in a trade such as driver, clerk etc after several years of service. May not sound glamorous now but it will pay dividends when you're looking to come out of the forces. While the opportunity still exists in the army the chances of you getting on it are far harder than in the marines.

Just my 2 cents, take it or leave it

Original post by Efron
Which ones more physically intense in the British Army. And is Royal marine commando training comparable to infantry.

Many thanks
If you are into fitness then why not Physical Training Instructor? A role available in the Civilian and Military worlds. Plus I heard trying to become a PTI in the Military is no easy task (which is easy to believe).

You need to consider your lifestyle more importantly. Fitness is important in the Forces but it stretches far beyond that. What do you want to do? What will energise you? What will motivate you to get up on a rubbish, dark, wet and -5 degree early morning and crack on to work?

If you don't want to be, for example a Driver in the civilian world but apply to become a driver in the Military just because they do PT during training unlike their civilian counterparts will you enjoy the driving job when training comes to an end and it's no longer PT every day? Of course not!

I am not in the Military and can't add anything to be super helpful when it comes to military questions but I feel this is basic thinking.
Original post by Drewski
Kid, you can't even spell rigorous...

Do you even know what you want to do? The initial training for any of these things lasts weeks whereas you're considering a career that can last years. You're flitting between roles and services more often than some people change socks...

Pick the lifestyle and role you prefer and worry about the training later.
If you don't like the idea of jumping out of planes, then thinking about joining the Paras is pretty dumb, no?


i thought you have to jump out of planes regardless of role in your initial training
Original post by lewis6969
i thought you have to jump out of planes regardless of role in your initial training

No, that would be pointless and horrendously expensive.
Reply 13
Original post by Stb1750
If you are into fitness then why not Physical Training Instructor? A role available in the Civilian and Military worlds. Plus I heard trying to become a PTI in the Military is no easy task (which is easy to believe).

You need to consider your lifestyle more importantly. Fitness is important in the Forces but it stretches far beyond that. What do you want to do? What will energise you? What will motivate you to get up on a rubbish, dark, wet and -5 degree early morning and crack on to work?

If you don't want to be, for example a Driver in the civilian world but apply to become a driver in the Military just because they do PT during training unlike their civilian counterparts will you enjoy the driving job when training comes to an end and it's no longer PT every day? Of course not!

I am not in the Military and can't add anything to be super helpful when it comes to military questions but I feel this is basic thinking.


I've finishing my law degree in about 2 years, so I thought that joining the army may give me a pupillage first time without any wait, and also in the meantime it's good to have an intense workout. That's what I heard of anyway, but I'm not sure completely.
Original post by Stb1750
If you are into fitness then why not Physical Training Instructor? A role available in the Civilian and Military worlds. Plus I heard trying to become a PTI in the Military is no easy task (which is easy to believe).

You need to consider your lifestyle more importantly. Fitness is important in the Forces but it stretches far beyond that. What do you want to do? What will energise you? What will motivate you to get up on a rubbish, dark, wet and -5 degree early morning and crack on to work?

If you don't want to be, for example a Driver in the civilian world but apply to become a driver in the Military just because they do PT during training unlike their civilian counterparts will you enjoy the driving job when training comes to an end and it's no longer PT every day? Of course not!

I am not in the Military and can't add anything to be super helpful when it comes to military questions but I feel this is basic thinking.


This ^^^ is actually a good idea.

It fully depends what service you join.

Can't speak for the navy but you can straight up join the RAF as a PTI and that is your bread and butter and you don't do anything else.

In the army you cannot join straight as a PTI. You join in another job, do the relevant training for that job and then when you get to your regiment, when you have your initial interview with your hierarchy you inform them you have aspirations of becoming a PTI. They will then load you onto the course when the opportunity becomes available. You then go and do the PTI course but you remain a part of the cap badge you work for (engineers, med corps etc). You however will be working in the gym setting up and leading sessions when your squadron/company do PT.

Essentialy this means that you still have your trade in the army but you can also do the PTI side of things. Useful for when you decide to leave the forces! Don't take the following as gospel as this is where my knowledge gets a bit hazy but you then have the option of doing a further PTI course and transferring fully to the Army physical training corps which means you can go wherever you like as a PTI.

Another thing to bear in mind (not many prospective joiners know this) is that you can still do P Company and the All Arms Commando Course in other branches of the army such as Engineers or med corps, so again you can still get a trade but if you really want to get some extra badges and a different coloured lid then you can!

What I'm trying to say is that in the RAF and I believe the Navy you are pigeon holed into 1 job whereas with the army you can branch out. If you're going to commit x amount of years to the forces then make the system work for you and get something out of it in return!

Just a bit of extra food for thought son 🤷*♂️

Original post by lewis6969
i thought you have to jump out of planes regardless of role in your initial training

No you do not
(edited 4 years ago)
Original post by Efron
I've finishing my law degree in about 2 years, so I thought that joining the army may give me a pupillage first time without any wait, and also in the meantime it's good to have an intense workout. That's what I heard of anyway, but I'm not sure completely.

So you're thinking about joining at the basic private / airman / marine level? That makes zero sense and you'd feel horribly out of place.

And why would you think that about the Army? Have you looked into what their legal officer requirements and system is?
Reply 16
Original post by Drewski
So you're thinking about joining at the basic private / airman / marine level? That makes zero sense and you'd feel horribly out of place.

And why would you think that about the Army? Have you looked into what their legal officer requirements and system is?


I'll obviously join in as an officer, after training I heard it's less daunting for officers with degrees, especially if I do a pupillage after training then I'll be in the army legal services, and then after a couple of years in there, I'll come out and I can be a lawyer/barrister in the normal world without doing a pupillage.
Original post by Efron
I'll obviously join in as an officer, after training I heard it's less daunting for officers with degrees, especially if I do a pupillage after training then I'll be in the army legal services, and then after a couple of years in there, I'll come out and I can be a lawyer/barrister in the normal world without doing a pupillage.

Then all the threads asking about various types of training you've made are redundant as if you join as an officer you don't do the same things.

What do you mean by "less daunting"?
Reply 18
Original post by Drewski
Then all the threads asking about various types of training you've made are redundant as if you join as an officer you don't do the same things.


Yeah but isn't the training the same initially? I thought officer training comes afterwards
Original post by Efron
Yeah but isn't the training the same initially? I thought officer training comes afterwards

No.

You need to go and have a look at the Army's careers site, it explains all of this.

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