Who do you think will win the next general election? Watch

AnonymousGuest
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There's going to be an election soon, whether that be in December or next year, so I'm asking everyone who they would vote for (regardless of age) and why.

Personally, for me I think the Conservatives are becoming too right wing and Labour becoming too left wing, so ideally I would support a centrist party like the Lib Dems but I don't think they have enough support to win a general election yet(I may be wrong).

That being said I would prefer the Labour Party over the Conservatives. I don't like Corbyn mainly because of McDonnell but compared to Johnson and Cummings, I would definitely support Labour but I'm not old enough to vote. That's my opinion anway so feel free to express whatever your opinion is but please do not abuse anyone or use offensive language.
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ColinDent
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(Original post by AnonymousGuest)
There's going to be an election soon, whether that be in December or next year, so I'm asking everyone who they would vote for (regardless of age) and why.

Personally, for me I think the Conservatives are becoming too right wing and Labour becoming too left wing, so ideally I would support a centrist party like the Lib Dems but I don't think they have enough support to win a general election yet(I may be wrong).

That being said I would prefer the Labour Party over the Conservatives. I don't like Corbyn mainly because of McDonnell but compared to Johnson and Cummings, I would definitely support Labour but I'm not old enough to vote. That's my opinion anway so feel free to express whatever your opinion is but please do not abuse anyone or use offensive language.
The Conservatives will win any upcoming election.
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paul514
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(Original post by AnonymousGuest)
There's going to be an election soon, whether that be in December or next year, so I'm asking everyone who they would vote for (regardless of age) and why.

Personally, for me I think the Conservatives are becoming too right wing and Labour becoming too left wing, so ideally I would support a centrist party like the Lib Dems but I don't think they have enough support to win a general election yet(I may be wrong).

That being said I would prefer the Labour Party over the Conservatives. I don't like Corbyn mainly because of McDonnell but compared to Johnson and Cummings, I would definitely support Labour but I'm not old enough to vote. That's my opinion anway so feel free to express whatever your opinion is but please do not abuse anyone or use offensive language.
The result will either be conservatives in power or a coalition of every other party combined with a tiny majority.

That would mean staying in the EU and the SNP being granted a second independence referendum.

In reality if the brexit party continues to poll at the level it is currently the conservatives will win a majority.
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AnonymousGuest
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Perhaps the question should also include 'which party you wish to win the election?'So feel free to comment on your opinion of who you think is going to win an election but also which party you want to win the election and why.
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Kitten in boots
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Conservatives to win.

They'll deliver Brexit and use the opportunity to strip back workers rights and selling everything that isn’t nailed down to American corporations. It’s the outcome Brexiters wanted.
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nofluxgiven
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Who I think will win: The Conservative and 'Unionist' Party.
Who I want to win: not the Labour Party.
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Burton Bridge
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The conservatives because brexit is the will of the people and they are the only ones that the public perceive as delivering it.
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CTLeafez
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I'd vote the Brexit Party because BREXIT MEANS BREXIT!!!

Nah, I'm not too sure who I'd vote for anymore. I think I'll need to read the parties' manifestos again.

I'd voted Labour in the previous snap election but I've begun to disagree with their policies regarding education.
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c.shell
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Ughh, unfortunately I'm pretty sure Conservatives will win by a landslide but as I'm in a very safe labour seat, if I was old enough to vote I'd either vote Lib Dem or Green.
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fallen_acorns
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There is too much confidence around the conservatives at the moment.

For me, Farage is still a huge problem. Boris is a good campaigner, and a good speaker - he won't have the same problems May had in her election, but May didn't have to contend with Farage.

At the moment the Brexit parties numbers are lower, and its looking good.. but they aren't really doing anything right now. Except his radio shows, and an occasional TV apperance Farage+co are pretty quiet. That won't be the same in an actual election, and as good as boris has been in public, Farage is far better.

How well will boris' deal stand up when its branded as May 2.0, and not a real 'brexit' by Farage? The last 2 by-elections the conservatives should have won.. but lost because of the brexit-party splitting the vote (at a much higher number than they are currently polling though). I said on here a while back - before this deal, boris had the brexit-vote locked down, but now hes shifted back into the middle.. Hes core passionate supporters will be the 'lets just get it over with' voters, who are fed up of brexit and just want it done. If he can't keep the actual ideological brexiteers on board though, he won't get a majority, and it will come down to whether the other parties can work together.

The other factor is Labour. There could be a big big shift if they come out fully for remain. That really shakes up the map, and if they can actually stomach working with the Lib dems, and not splitting the vote in key seats, they could win. I don't think either of these will happen though. Labour have turned down so many chances to back remain.. and workign with the Lib dems would be a humiliation for them it seems.

If I had to put a grand on it right now.. I put a grand on a tory victory, but without a majority. Brexit party splits the vote, but don't actually win many seats. Whether the other parties can form a majority coalition will depend on whether corbyn stands down or not.
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paul514
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(Original post by fallen_acorns)
There is too much confidence around the conservatives at the moment.

For me, Farage is still a huge problem. Boris is a good campaigner, and a good speaker - he won't have the same problems May had in her election, but May didn't have to contend with Farage.

At the moment the Brexit parties numbers are lower, and its looking good.. but they aren't really doing anything right now. Except his radio shows, and an occasional TV apperance Farage+co are pretty quiet. That won't be the same in an actual election, and as good as boris has been in public, Farage is far better.

How well will boris' deal stand up when its branded as May 2.0, and not a real 'brexit' by Farage? The last 2 by-elections the conservatives should have won.. but lost because of the brexit-party splitting the vote (at a much higher number than they are currently polling though). I said on here a while back - before this deal, boris had the brexit-vote locked down, but now hes shifted back into the middle.. Hes core passionate supporters will be the 'lets just get it over with' voters, who are fed up of brexit and just want it done. If he can't keep the actual ideological brexiteers on board though, he won't get a majority, and it will come down to whether the other parties can work together.

The other factor is Labour. There could be a big big shift if they come out fully for remain. That really shakes up the map, and if they can actually stomach working with the Lib dems, and not splitting the vote in key seats, they could win. I don't think either of these will happen though. Labour have turned down so many chances to back remain.. and workign with the Lib dems would be a humiliation for them it seems.

If I had to put a grand on it right now.. I put a grand on a tory victory, but without a majority. Brexit party splits the vote, but don't actually win many seats. Whether the other parties can form a majority coalition will depend on whether corbyn stands down or not.
I’m an ideological brexit voter and I back boris’ deal.

68% of brexit party voters back boris’ deal.
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fallen_acorns
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(Original post by paul514)
I’m an ideological brexit voter and I back boris’ deal.

68% of brexit party voters back boris’ deal.
Why do you think that is though?

For me, and in my experiance with brexit voters, the main motivation to back Boris' deal over May's deal, despite them being largely the same is two things: 1, the possibility of just using it as a stepping point towards a 'true' brexit, and 2, the increasing fear of brexit being revoked.

A lot of commentators have been right in my eyes, when they say that had Boris presented his deal 1 or 2 years ago, it would have been soundly rejected by both sides of the debate. As it is, I think there are a lot of Brexiteers who are viewing this as 'better than nothing' and the last shot before remainers potentially find a way to stop it for good.

That changes somewhat in an election though. Farage can argue 'vote for me, and get a coalition between the brexit-party and the conservative party.. if you do that, we will hold them to account and force a true brexit'. In an election its suddenly not just boris' deal or remain.. Farage is back in the game presenting a third option, and if hes presenting a more 'true' version of brexit, or adaption of Boris' deal, then that could cause some real problems for the conservatives.
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Anonnorth
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I know which one wont win, that's Labour.
A toxic leader and sitting on the fence regarding Brexit.

Remainers will vote for a middle party that have already determined to Remain and scrap Brwxit.
Leavers will vote Brexit party or Conservative because their own Labour MPs have ignored them over the last 3 year despite majority votes in those areas to leave
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nulli tertius
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(Original post by fallen_acorns)
Why do you think that is though?

For me, and in my experiance with brexit voters, the main motivation to back Boris' deal over May's deal, despite them being largely the same is two things: 1, the possibility of just using it as a stepping point towards a 'true' brexit, and 2, the increasing fear of brexit being revoked.

A lot of commentators have been right in my eyes, when they say that had Boris presented his deal 1 or 2 years ago, it would have been soundly rejected by both sides of the debate. As it is, I think there are a lot of Brexiteers who are viewing this as 'better than nothing' and the last shot before remainers potentially find a way to stop it for good.

That changes somewhat in an election though. Farage can argue 'vote for me, and get a coalition between the brexit-party and the conservative party.. if you do that, we will hold them to account and force a true brexit'. In an election its suddenly not just boris' deal or remain.. Farage is back in the game presenting a third option, and if hes presenting a more 'true' version of brexit, or adaption of Boris' deal, then that could cause some real problems for the conservatives.
You are rather running together two different arguments under 2.

There is a difference between fear of losing Brexit and a realisation that Brexit is genuinely a lot more difficult than they believe or were led to believe earlier in the process. Once you accept that there is no simple Brexit, it becomes very hard to die in a ditch (to coin a phrase) to oppose one of a variety of complicated messes.

Farage’s support seems to be stuck at around 12% and they are largely the people who believe that there is a simple answer to Brexit.
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SHallowvale
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Conservatives, definitely.

It's a shame our electoral system works the way it does.
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nulli tertius
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I think the election will be hung much as it is now but with an increased showing from the Lib Dems.

The situation in Scotland means it is almost impossible for Labour to win nationally.

The Conservatives will be punished in some Remainer areas (although not as many as Labour and Lib Dem supporters hope).

The Conservatives will make no progress in the the working class north. Unlike in Cameron's day, there are only two politically insignificant cabinet ministers with seats in Northern England.
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SHallowvale
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(Original post by nulli tertius)
I think the election will be hung much as it is now but with an increased showing from the Lib Dems.

The situation in Scotland means it is almost impossible for Labour to win nationally.

The Conservatives will be punished in some Remainer areas (although not as many as Labour and Lib Dem supporters hope).

The Conservatives will make no progress in the the working class north. Unlike in Cameron's day, there are only two politically insignificant cabinet ministers with seats in Northern England.
It seems very unlikely that an election will result in a hung parliament. The numbers we saw in 2010 which resulted in a hung parliament don't compare well to what is expected now. The Conservatives have too strong a lead over Labour and the Lib Dems aren't consistently polling as high as they would need to be.

I'd very much like there to be a hung parliament, it just looks impossible. Labour certainly aren't anywhere close to getting a majority nationally.
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nulli tertius
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(Original post by SHallowvale)
It seems very unlikely that an election will result in a hung parliament. The numbers we saw in 2010 which resulted in a hung parliament don't compare well to what is expected now. The Conservatives have too strong a lead over Labour and the Lib Dems aren't consistently polling as high as they would need to be.

I'd very much like there to be a hung parliament, it just looks impossible. Labour certainly aren't anywhere close to getting a majority nationally.
But we had a hung Parliament in 2017. May only governed by reason of a deal with the DUP.

To unhang the next Parliament Boris must win seats May didn’t win in 2017. Which seats are going to be Tory gains?
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paul514
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(Original post by fallen_acorns)
Why do you think that is though?

For me, and in my experiance with brexit voters, the main motivation to back Boris' deal over May's deal, despite them being largely the same is two things: 1, the possibility of just using it as a stepping point towards a 'true' brexit, and 2, the increasing fear of brexit being revoked.

A lot of commentators have been right in my eyes, when they say that had Boris presented his deal 1 or 2 years ago, it would have been soundly rejected by both sides of the debate. As it is, I think there are a lot of Brexiteers who are viewing this as 'better than nothing' and the last shot before remainers potentially find a way to stop it for good.

That changes somewhat in an election though. Farage can argue 'vote for me, and get a coalition between the brexit-party and the conservative party.. if you do that, we will hold them to account and force a true brexit'. In an election its suddenly not just boris' deal or remain.. Farage is back in the game presenting a third option, and if hes presenting a more 'true' version of brexit, or adaption of Boris' deal, then that could cause some real problems for the conservatives.
90% of mays deal was fine the issues were ......

Not having a trade deal attached because of the order of talks she agreed to.
The backstop
And alignment being in the withdrawal agreement

Boris’ deal fixed 2 and 3 by making them an issue for trade deal talks so like you say it can be as true a brexit as they like if a deal isn’t reached on stage 2.

It is also a fact as you say that it is a way of getting brexit done and grabbing on to it.

This is why those 68% agree with it.

Nigel’s arguments superfluous!

He says there’s no trade deal, when that isn’t possible.
He moans about all the stuff in the future partnership that isn’t legally binding, which is key.
He eggs on a no deal which isn’t possible with the parliamentary maths and could be possible if no trade agreement is reached....

The whole argument of vote for me for a coalition is rubbish he isn’t going to get the seats, and this is a point that will be made repeatedly by the conservatives “a vote for Farage is a vote for remain” or something similar will be the line.
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AnonymousGuest
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Which party would you guys vote for in terms of their post-brexit manifesto? The Brexit Party, clearly states in the name, it is revolved around Brexit. What are their aims after Brexit? However, in a hypothetical situation where perhaps lets say Brexit happened, which party, in terms of their aims for the country (not Brexit!) would you vote for and why?
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