Eggs and Ham
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Hello everyone,

I hope you're all well.

I have been looking at some entry-level jobs at Google and have been surprised by the fact that you don't need any experience (only a BA degree, any classification). They're mostly Analyst-type jobs. You don't need any tech experience, programming skills or specialised degree.

They would be my dream company to work for.

I've heard the only way to get a job is through an employee referral.

Does anyone have any advice they can offer, in terms of applying for jobs and how to get my foot in the door? Anyone applied for a role and heard back?

How can I gain an employee referral? I heard the employee gets a $4,000 bonus, so there is some incentive to help people they may know.
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riverpath2
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Reach out to your alumni network! My friend got unto the third round of Google through a referral. Also, talking to current employees at LinkedIn (the company I would apply) also helps - and asking what exactly is it they do. That helped me to prepare for interviews accordingly, and tailor my answers - such as talking about work experiences that are more associated with that role. What I've realized is that the recruiters care mostly about 'fit', and my interviewers were always impressed when I had a clear idea of the position I would be working at. If you're interested in tech, this compilation of interviews of people working at Google/Amazon/LinkedIn could be useful!
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Eggs and Ham
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(Original post by riverpath2)
Reach out to your alumni network! My friend got unto the third round of Google through a referral. Also, talking to current employees at LinkedIn (the company I would apply) also helps - and asking what exactly is it they do. That helped me to prepare for interviews accordingly, and tailor my answers - such as talking about work experiences that are more associated with that role. What I've realized is that the recruiters care mostly about 'fit', and my interviewers were always impressed when I had a clear idea of the position I would be working at. If you're interested in tech, this compilation of interviews of people working at Google/Amazon/LinkedIn could be useful!
Thanks for this, the info on the link was very helpful. I don't really know who works at FAANG... I do have an old flame that currently works at Google but we haven't been in touch and it would be a bit odd contacting them again for a referral.

Is it acceptable to contact people on LinkedIn even if I don't know them? Can they give me referral or does it strictly have to only be someone I have worked with or studied with?
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gcseeeman
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(Original post by Eggs and Ham)
I've heard the only way to get a job is through an employee referral.
You can get jobs without a referral. A referral can definitely help get your CV looked at, but it doesn't make the rest of the process any easier. Referrals from people who don't know you and cannot speak to your competence for a job are not going to offer much over applying directly.

As riverpath2 suggests, looking through your "network" is probably the best way to find somebody to refer you, and reaching out to an "old flame" is more likely to work than reaching out to a total stranger - you could ask a stranger, but it wouldn't be very googley of them to refer somebody they don't know. If you're really stuck for actual connections, I'd advise just applying through Google's website (this option is there for a reason!) or maybe reaching out specifically to recruiters for the kind of role you want.

I can't offer much advice for non-tech roles (which, in my opinion, are considerably harder to obtain, because the process is far less transparent), except to say that the vast majority of applicants do not receive offers (including many people now working at Google who didn't get an offer until the second or third try), so if you don't end up in your "dream company" this time, just remember there are many great places to work. The more you improve yourself through experience, the better your chances of landing a job at them become in the future.

I'd also seriously reflect on them being a dream company, rather than having a specific dream role in mind. Aiming solely to get into a company, without really thinking about what you'll do, seems a little unhealthy - all the free food in the world won't make up for having to work every day in a job you hate.

Good luck!
Last edited by gcseeeman; 1 year ago
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Eggs and Ham
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(Original post by gcseeeman)
You can get jobs without a referral. A referral can definitely help get your CV looked at, but it doesn't make the rest of the process any easier. Referrals from people who don't know you and cannot speak to your competence for a job are not going to offer much over applying directly.

As riverpath2 suggests, looking through your "network" is probably the best way to find somebody to refer you, and reaching out to an "old flame" is more likely to work than reaching out to a total stranger - you could ask a stranger, but it wouldn't be very googley of them to refer somebody they don't know. If you're really stuck for actual connections, I'd advise just applying through Google's website (this option is there for a reason!) or maybe reaching out specifically to recruiters for the kind of role you want.

I can't offer much advice for non-tech roles (which, in my opinion, are considerably harder to obtain, because the process is far less transparent), except to say that the vast majority of applicants do not receive offers (including many people now working at Google who didn't get an offer until the second or third try), so if you don't end up in your "dream company" this time, just remember there are many great places to work. The more you improve yourself through experience, the better your chances of landing a job at them become in the future.

I'd also seriously reflect on them being a dream company, rather than having a specific dream role in mind. Aiming solely to get into a company, without really thinking about what you'll do, seems a little unhealthy - all the free food in the world won't make up for having to work every day in a job you hate.

Good luck!
A great response, thank you so much for this. It's extremely helpful. I am not solely looking to apply simply because they are a 'dream company'. I'm extremely selective and have only applied for roles that I think would be a good fit. I actually have a telephone interview for another low-tier organisation booked and I'm looking into different places that would be a good fit for me. The most important thing is the actual role and not the company. It has to be a role where I can develop my existing skills set.
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winterscoming
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(Original post by Eggs and Ham)
A great response, thank you so much for this. It's extremely helpful. I am not solely looking to apply simply because they are a 'dream company'. I'm extremely selective and have only applied for roles that I think would be a good fit. I actually have a telephone interview for another low-tier organisation booked and I'm looking into different places that would be a good fit for me. The most important thing is the actual role and not the company. It has to be a role where I can develop my existing skills set.
If you're applying for a junior tech role, then you'd be developing your skills a lot in pretty much any company you join - there's really no need to be selective at all when you're at that stage in your career because there's always going to be a huge amount to learn during the first couple of years at any company. Obviously not everywhere may necessarily have the ethos or right workplace culture that you're looking for, although it's actually almost impossible to really know any of that sort of thing until you've been to a face-to-face interview and had a chance to meet/talk them first-hand and get a look around the place.

Some of the best companies to work for will often be small, independent, privately owned businesses with a total of maybe 50-100 employees, operating out of some unimpressive building/location, with a slightly bland/boring product or service to offer but a really great, supportive, friendly, experienced/skilled group of people to work with and be in the office with for 7.5hrs per day.
Last edited by winterscoming; 1 year ago
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