difference between stationary waves and progressive waves Watch

student144
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the textbook didn't make sense apparently stationary waves are two progressive waves
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GgbroTG
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(Original post by student144)
the textbook didn't make sense apparently stationary waves are two progressive waves
A stationary wave (or standing wave) is the superposition of two identical progressive waves travelling in opposite directions. In most cases, this is a wave and its reflection - say, a single string attached to a stationary point on one end and a vibration generator on the other. The wave travels through the string in one direction then is reflected back upon itself (it's for this reason that the length of the medium has set possible values to result in a standing wave, in order to maintain a certain phase). The difference between a stationary wave and a progressive wave is that in the former the wave does not appear to travel. The wave appears to be stationary, and adjacent points are in phase, meaning no energy is transferred. In a progressive wave, the oscillation travels through the medium meaning the phase of adjacent points is constantly changing (resulting in a transfer of energy).

In short, a progressive wave travels through the medium. When two identical progressive waves travel in opposite directions through the medium, the wave appears to be stationary, creating a standing wave.
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YEezzy
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I don't know if I should pick biology or physics, I find suvat kinda long but not fun... Like I used to hate biology but I like it... But I don't know if I should go for something else





I am undecided
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GgbroTG
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(Original post by YEezzy)
I don't know if I should pick biology or physics, I find suvat kinda long but not fun... Like I used to hate biology but I like it... But I don't know if I should go for something else





I am undecided
I mean, I'm utterly biased in favour of Physics, so naturally I'd recommend picking it. There are plenty far more interesting topics than SUVAT equations throughout the course (A-Level, I'm assuming?), but also much more difficult topics. That being said, Biology isn't necessarily easier, but is much more boring (in my humble, absolutely biased opinion).
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student144
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(Original post by YEezzy)
I don't know if I should pick biology or physics, I find suvat kinda long but not fun... Like I used to hate biology but I like it... But I don't know if I should go for something else





I am undecided
if you do not want to go university and instead want to do apprenticeship picks physics-almost very apprenticeship job requires physics,if you want to go to university then look at each subject carefully and decide what you would want to do in the long run
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student144
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(Original post by GgbroTG)
A stationary wave (or standing wave) is the superposition of two identical progressive waves travelling in opposite directions. In most cases, this is a wave and its reflection - say, a single string attached to a stationary point on one end and a vibration generator on the other. The wave travels through the string in one direction then is reflected back upon itself (it's for this reason that the length of the medium has set possible values to result in a standing wave, in order to maintain a certain phase). The difference between a stationary wave and a progressive wave is that in the former the wave does not appear to travel. The wave appears to be stationary, and adjacent points are in phase, meaning no energy is transferred. In a progressive wave, the oscillation travels through the medium meaning the phase of adjacent points is constantly changing (resulting in a transfer of energy).

In short, a progressive wave travels through the medium. When two identical progressive waves travel in opposite directions through the medium, the wave appears to be stationary, creating a standing wave.
so a progressive wave is just one wave which travels through a medium but a stationary/standing wave is two progressive waves that look stationary and do not transfer energy as they are in a fixed position
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YEezzy
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(Original post by GgbroTG)
I mean, I'm utterly biased in favour of Physics, so naturally I'd recommend picking it. There are plenty far more interesting topics than SUVAT equations throughout the course (A-Level, I'm assuming?), but also much more difficult topics. That being said, Biology isn't necessarily easier, but is much more boring (in my humble, absolutely biased opinion).
To be honest I don't know if I am forcing my self to like physics, like I like it but I can't be bothered to go into it, maybe social science
But I don't. Know
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YEezzy
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(Original post by student144)
if you do not want to go university and instead want to do apprenticeship picks physics-almost very apprenticeship job requires physics,if you want to go to university then look at each subject carefully and decide what you would want to do in the long run
The thing is I want to go. University but I don't know what a levels. To pick or degree I would. Be passionate about
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GgbroTG
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(Original post by student144)
so a progressive wave is just one wave which travels through a medium but a stationary/standing wave is two progressive waves that look stationary and do not transfer energy as they are in a fixed position
Essentially, yes. In a standing wave, the wave still appears to move but only up and down (like a progressive wave, but without actually moving forwards). As I said, the two progressive waves that create a wave need to be identical in most respects (same amplitude, frequency), and as such the most common way to create a standing wave is to reflect a single progressive wave back upon itself at a point where the displacement is 0 (i.e. a node).
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