Should 16-year-olds be able to vote? The 2019 edition. Watch

Poll: What should happen to the UK voting age?
It should be lowered to 16 (272)
44.37%
It should stay at 18 (341)
55.63%
londonmyst
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#81
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#81
(Original post by Zoqua)
But why should we 16 year old's not be allowed to vote when we're just as politically aware, and are being given more social responsibilities... To name just a few of the things we can do, we can consent to sex, get married, get a national insurance number, join trade unions, join the armed forces and apply for a passport which doesn't require parental consent. If we're responsible enough to do all of that then why can't we vote as well? If we're judged to be mature enough to do these things then why shouldn't we be allowed to vote? It's our future in the balance just as much as young adults and more so than many of the older generations.....
Parental responsibility for their progeny ends when the child reaches 18.
Sexual consent is subject to restrictions that don't apply to over 18s.
Marriage of 16 year olds is legal with parental consent, with court permission in the absence of parental consent and at Gretna Green.

My friend's 13 year old sister has a national insurance number and is a higher rate tax payer.
My best friend joined a political party when she was 15, paid her annual membership fee and remains a member.
The minimum age for military deployment is 18, a 16 year old is not allowed to serve on front line and the uk is the only member of NATO to allow 16 year olds to join the military. I am opposed to the practice.

A 16 year old may well require a passport for id purposes but overseas travel of under 18s usually requires parental or court consent.
Children as young as 11 have to sign for their own uk passports.
I doubt that signing for a passport is intended to be viewed as indicative of maturity or being considered as responsible as the average adult.
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Muttley79
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#82
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#82
(Original post by rosacherry)
I agree that it isn't the most sensible idea to give 16 year olds a vote HOWEVER they can buy a house, have children and join the army so it seems somewhat backwards that you can do all that but not vote at 16
You can't buy a house at 16 and must be in education or training. You are not legally an adult until you are 18.
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Zoqua
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#83
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#83
(Original post by C.Goodyear)
Rubbish
https://lordashcroftpolls.com/2019/0...endum-and-why/

https://www.ft.com/content/79e73d5c-...5-82a9b15a8ee7

https://yougov.co.uk/topics/politics...-britain-voted

If it's 'rubbish' then explain these, or is it also 'rubbish' that over 50% means majority?
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ANM775
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#84
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#84
(Original post by londonmyst)
a 16 year old is not allowed to serve on front line and the uk is the only member of NATO to allow 16 year olds to join the military. I am opposed to the practice.

probably because our army is so small and no one is interested in fighting for our country. I saw a chart once with a question like "would you join the army if your country went to war" and the UK had one of the lowest "yes" votes, and Russia the highest.

I even saw a poll like this on TSR and everyone wants to do something in an office or something [out-of-harms-way] if a war comes.

I think 16 is too young to be joining too tbh, but with our army so small ..I don't think they're going to be raising the age anytime soon as it's just gonna bring in less recruits......
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Burton Bridge
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#85
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#85
No
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Muttley79
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#86
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#86
(Original post by Zoqua)
, it is the so called 'wisdom' of the older generations that got us into this Brexit mess (with the majority of those who voted to leave the EU being pensioners)....
Evidence? It was the working-class areas not necessarily pensioners that voted 'leave'
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nulli tertius
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#87
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#87
(Original post by Rakas21)
This is literally why Wilson dropped it from 21 to 18.
That isn't really the case.

The primary one was that most 18, 19 and 20 year olds were economically independent of their parents with a school leaving age of 15, no national service and full employment with good wages. However, they lacked legal independence and that was becoming more acute in an economically modern world. They couldn't enter into tenancies, most contracts, borrow money, write cheques.

There was a Committee of Inquiry that produced a report in 1967, the Latey Report. The reduction in the voting age simply went along with the decision to reduce the age of majority from 21 to 18.

Incidentally 19 and 20 year old males who served in WWI had the vote. Goodness knows when the last boy sailor or drummer boy exercised that right.
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Darelz
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#88
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#88
When I was younger I may have said yes, and argued young people deserve a say in their future. But my opinions changed drastically between when I was 16 to 18, going from one extreme to another. Your opinions are still forming in those years, and I'm not sure having the pressure to vote would be conductive healthy development of your opinions. Now that I'm almost 21, I've come to realise how little I know. I don't have any evidence to back this up, but I think 16 years can be overly confident in their opinions. Many don't appreciate the nuance that most political issues have... although to be fair, I've meant plenty of adults with black and white thinking too. I'd have to look into the research on development of opinions and decision-making in young people before I could give a firm answer, but right now I'm leaning towards no.

EDIT:
And that's not to say 16 year olds all make terrible, uninformed decisions. Many can back up their opinion with good reasoning and evidence. But in my experience, they can take overly black and white approaches to incredibly grey issues. I think this is what contributed to my own flip-flopping: I'd be totally confident in X, but when I finally accepted some evidence that X wasn't entirely right I'd completely reject X, because it had to be either completely right or completely wrong. This is entirely anecdotal though.
Last edited by Darelz; 2 weeks ago
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weeemma
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#89
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#89
Yes they should be allowed as they can vote at 16 in Scotland and Wales but can't in England, it should be the same in whole of the UK.

They are the future generation of our country and there children to, so its time to bring things in line for everyone.
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Vinny C
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#90
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#90
Yes.. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aja7Ixj3-w0
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4moreyears
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#91
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#91
18 yr. Olds shouldnt be allowed to 🗳
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Burton Bridge
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#92
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#92
When even the student rooms votes against lowering the voting age to 16, you know it's a bonkers idea
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Rakas21
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#93
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#93
(Original post by weeemma)
Yes they should be allowed as they can vote at 16 in Scotland and Wales but can't in England, it should be the same in whole of the UK.

They are the future generation of our country and there children to, so its time to bring things in line for everyone.
I agree it should be the same but that’s a reason to repeal the change in those places, not make a poor decision for General elections.
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RazzzBerries
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#94
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#94
100% yes
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Bang Outta Order
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#95
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#95
(Original post by The Mogg)
41.85% - 58.15% in favour of No (it was like 38-62 when I said that, so the lead has gone down a bit since.)
damn kids
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Bang Outta Order
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#96
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#96
(Original post by RazzzBerries)
100% yes
Stop tryna wind me up
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Fazzy_77
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#97
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#97
I don't think they should but its a little annoying that the election will happen like 2 weeks before I turn 18.
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1st superstar
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#98
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#98
(Original post by Bang Outta Order)
Why da magenta fo'
I like the colour
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jamesbarry17
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#99
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#99
Most 16-year-olds are utterly clueless and completely manipulatable, so no.
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MajorKong
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#100
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#100
Here's a radical idea...
Raise the age to 21.
Then, you have a better experience of the world in general, and are more likely to take the vote seriously. You are more likely to now be working, and have grown up from old fantasies, now taking on adult responsibilities. When the voting age was lowered to 18, 4/5s of 16-18 year olds were now working. Now that number is only 29% (https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-46737013) Since, less young people are working, not taking on adult responsibilities, a case could be made to raise it back to 21. You're more grown up by then.
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