how does priestley use language and structure to evoke change in act 3?

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milkteabooty
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(an inspector calls) i need some tips on what to write about. thanks
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EpicChefUK
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It's been a while since I studied An Inspector Calls... But perhaps it's worth noting the change in attitudes each character has after Inspector Goole exposes their case.
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Davy611
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'Evoke' seems a strange word to use. Was this the question?

I agree with the above post: Birling and his wife don't demonstrate the capacity or desire for change unless they're forced to due to the impact upon their status and reputation. Sheila does want to change; she's 'learned' from the experience. Eric appears to want to change but I don't find his behaviour credible; everything he's done prior to this has been so motivated by entitlement and arrogance that I think he'll swiftly revert back to type. This isn't necessarily an opinion held by all. Gerald's too much a part of the establishment. He won't change either.

Both Eric and Gerald will be 'taught' their lesson in 'blood and fire and anguish'. World War 1.
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EpicChefUK
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(Original post by Davy611)
'Evoke' seems a strange word to use. Was this the question?

I agree with the above post: Birling and his wife don't demonstrate the capacity or desire for change unless they're forced to due to the impact upon their status and reputation. Sheila does want to change; she's 'learned' from the experience. Eric appears to want to change but I don't find his behaviour credible; everything he's done prior to this has been so motivated by entitlement and arrogance that I think he'll swiftly revert back to type. This isn't necessarily an opinion held by all. Gerald's too much a part of the establishment. He won't change either.

Both Eric and Gerald will be 'taught' their lesson in 'blood and fire and anguish'. World War 1.
Very true indeed. You can see how guilty she is. She says "I'm sorry, I'm so, so sorry. I was sorry even as I did it, I don't know why I did it..." Arthur, obviously fixed in his ways, tells her "You don't need to apologize to anyone" but the Inspector quickly, in his typical down-to-earth fashion, says "you did it because you were jealous of her." And Sheila quickly admits "Yes, it was because she was so pretty. She seemed so sure of herself. I'd... I'd never do it again. Not to anyone."
Even Gerald says "It certainly was... unfortunate." But Sheila refutes: "Oh just say it Gerald! It was a horrible thing to do. Horrible. I suppose you've never done anything you regret."
She then says "Why had this to happen?" And the Inspector repeats: "That's what I asked myself this afternoon when I was looking at that dead girl, why had this to happen?... and that's why I won't be going until I know exactly why it happened."
Since then, Sheila's attitude takes a major turn and she joins the Inspector's side in finding out what happened.
Last edited by EpicChefUK; 2 years ago
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