Cupcake21T
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 2 weeks ago
#1
What’s it like being a primary school teacher? I really loved the idea of being one! I’m currently in year 12 and would really love to know the life of an actual primary teacher. How was the degree? Is teaching actually enjoyable? Is it a rewarding career? Just that sort of stuff! Let me know!!
0
reply
HeenaK
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#2
Report 2 weeks ago
#2
Trust me! You don't want to go there. You may think it will be an easy job but it isn't. My family from experience don't at all recommend it. OVERWORKED, UNDERPAID
0
reply
Cupcake21T
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 2 weeks ago
#3
(Original post by HeenaK)
Trust me! You don't want to go there. You may think it will be an easy job but it isn't. My family from experience don't at all recommend it. OVERWORKED, UNDERPAID
You do get a lot of holidays compared to a standard office job so I guess that’s an advantage?
0
reply
wonderland.16
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#4
Report 2 weeks ago
#4
I'm in my final year of training, so whilst I certainly can't comment to the same level as a qualified teacher, I can share some of my experiences on placement. I want to emphasise this is just my experience.

I'm on the BAEd QTS course so it's different to the PGCE. It's hard work, don't get me wrong. A lot of theory, deadlines, PDP and school stuff to do at all times. I love it personally as I like being busy, but a lot struggle.

For instance, this week I've had reduced lectures, but I've been in uni 12 hours plus about the same again in the library to complete an assignment due next week. I submitted it this afternoon, tomorrow I start the next one, due in two weeks. Along with more in coming weeks. It certainly doesn't stop.

From my experience in school, it was certainly a challenging, demanding job, but also very rewarding. I used to get to school for 8am and sometimes leave at 8pm, to then go home and do a few more hours work. Half terms just don't exist for a lot of teachers unfortunately. They're spent planning, marking, doing assessments, data, resourcing, changing the classroom etc. Some teachers also go into school during the summer and plan for September.

Balancing work-life is tricky, certainly on placement. I did school work on weekends and evenings. If I was lucky I'd be able to attend a 1hr yoga class once a week. I don't think I saw my family for weeks. But, once that balance is achieved (staying on top of things as much as poss, prioritising etc) it gets a bit easier. Work never goes away unfortunately so prioritising is crucial.

I love planning creative lessons, getting to know the children, seeing those lightbulb moments. It truly is so rewarding in that sense. The breakthroughs, having kids come up to you so proud with their work. It makes it worth it in my eyes.

There is a high workload and when you factor in the hours outside the 9-3.30 that we aren't paid for, the wage isn't great. People say that we have holidays off but we don't really. I know many teachers who have taken extra jobs over the summer to tie money over.

My best advice, get into a school and experience it. That's the absolute best you can do. Talk to as many trainees and qualified teachers as you can. When/if you visit a school, notice what the teachers do with their time.

I've tried to keep this honest but not disheartening. So many people have tried to discourage me from teaching, but all I'll say is if you know you want it, you can cope with the workload and you're not in it for the money, then go for it. Experience is definitely the way forward. If nothing else, it'll help you decide, plus my experience has really helped me in uni.

I should add, I'm training in Wales, so our curriculum is different to England/elsewhere, so that could also impact my experience.

Hope this helps somewhat! Let me know if you have any other questions, happy to help as much as I can!
1
reply
Cupcake21T
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 2 weeks ago
#5
(Original post by wonderland.16)
I'm in my final year of training, so whilst I certainly can't comment to the same level as a qualified teacher, I can share some of my experiences on placement. I want to emphasise this is just my experience.

I'm on the BAEd QTS course so it's different to the PGCE. It's hard work, don't get me wrong. A lot of theory, deadlines, PDP and school stuff to do at all times. I love it personally as I like being busy, but a lot struggle.

For instance, this week I've had reduced lectures, but I've been in uni 12 hours plus about the same again in the library to complete an assignment due next week. I submitted it this afternoon, tomorrow I start the next one, due in two weeks. Along with more in coming weeks. It certainly doesn't stop.

From my experience in school, it was certainly a challenging, demanding job, but also very rewarding. I used to get to school for 8am and sometimes leave at 8pm, to then go home and do a few more hours work. Half terms just don't exist for a lot of teachers unfortunately. They're spent planning, marking, doing assessments, data, resourcing, changing the classroom etc. Some teachers also go into school during the summer and plan for September.

Balancing work-life is tricky, certainly on placement. I did school work on weekends and evenings. If I was lucky I'd be able to attend a 1hr yoga class once a week. I don't think I saw my family for weeks. But, once that balance is achieved (staying on top of things as much as poss, prioritising etc) it gets a bit easier. Work never goes away unfortunately so prioritising is crucial.

I love planning creative lessons, getting to know the children, seeing those lightbulb moments. It truly is so rewarding in that sense. The breakthroughs, having kids come up to you so proud with their work. It makes it worth it in my eyes.

There is a high workload and when you factor in the hours outside the 9-3.30 that we aren't paid for, the wage isn't great. People say that we have holidays off but we don't really. I know many teachers who have taken extra jobs over the summer to tie money over.

My best advice, get into a school and experience it. That's the absolute best you can do. Talk to as many trainees and qualified teachers as you can. When/if you visit a school, notice what the teachers do with their time.

I've tried to keep this honest but not disheartening. So many people have tried to discourage me from teaching, but all I'll say is if you know you want it, you can cope with the workload and you're not in it for the money, then go for it. Experience is definitely the way forward. If nothing else, it'll help you decide, plus my experience has really helped me in uni.

I should add, I'm training in Wales, so our curriculum is different to England/elsewhere, so that could also impact my experience.

Hope this helps somewhat! Let me know if you have any other questions, happy to help as much as I can!
Thanks! Do you plan on going into a higher role in the future, some sort of leadership or even head teacher?
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Which party will you be voting for in the General Election?

Conservatives (165)
18.71%
Labour (383)
43.42%
Liberal Democrats (171)
19.39%
Green Party (50)
5.67%
Brexit Party (22)
2.49%
Independent Group for Change (Change UK) (3)
0.34%
SNP (11)
1.25%
Plaid Cymru (8)
0.91%
Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) (1)
0.11%
Sinn Fein (1)
0.11%
SDLP (0)
0%
Ulster Unionist (2)
0.23%
UKIP (10)
1.13%
Other (8)
0.91%
None (47)
5.33%

Watched Threads

View All