Amber.xxx
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I'm in year 10 and I need help for this practice exam question. In my school we take our English gcse in year 10 and so I really need help!!
How is hyde presented as evil in the extract (the Carew murder case bit)
I have to define the evil and also how is is presented as evil in the whole novella once again define evil
Please help!!!!!
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crusty kebab
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I remember do Jekyll and Hyde, fu''ing hated it
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Amber.xxx
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(Original post by crusty kebab)
I remember do Jekyll and Hyde, fu''ing hated it
Ik its so hard and I realllyyy need help!!
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absolutelysprout
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what points have you got down so far??
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hannahw0255
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Hi I'm in year 11 and I had this question on my mock last year. I got 26/30 so I hope I can help:

Firstly use of dynamic verbs, such as "brandishing the cane", "stamping with his foot", "trampling" (same word used for the incident with the girl in chapter one).
Also consider allusions to primitive man such as "ape-like fury" and we also see this elsewhere in the novel with Hyde being described as "troglodytic" which basically means a cave man, and also Utterson says this after meeting Hyde, "God bless me, the man seems hardly human! Something troglodytic". Here the use of religious words shows that something unnerves Mr Utterson about Hyde in his soul, and that links to the strictly Christian society, but also the fact that Hyde does something to Utterson's soul in the way that people turn to religion in their moment of death. Also his sudden expression shows that something kust be wrong for a character that is usually describes as, "long, dark, dusty, dreary" in the opening lines. The primitive connotations also link to the context as it was around the same time as Charles Darwin's 'The Origin Of The Species' was published and people began to fear that if we had evolved from apes then, somehow, we might be able to evole backwards (called atavism). Hyde is the embodiment of this fear.
Also, the physical reaction people have to Hyde, and his physiognomy - is it his evil core that repulses people? Or merely his haunting appearance?
Consider also the fact that location in which Carew is murdered is, "brilliantly lit by the full moon", showing Hyde's daring. Also the moon links to the Gothic genre.
The fog mentioned at the start of the chapter is a motif synonymous with Hyde and tends to appear before or around the time he does - note Jekyll's lab is full of fog.
Other instances in the book with evil would obviously be the trampling of the girl with religious quotes, "like Satan", "it was hellish to see" etc. But for top marks you really want to consider themes and deeper meanings to the book, e.g. the evil within us all (as in we all have our own Hyde) "man is not truly one but truly two", and perhaps the evil setting such as in The Search for Mr Hyde, the tension that is created as Jekyll hears effectively a murderer coming towards him (sibilance in "the steps drew swiftly nearer and swelled out suddenly", and the eeriness of London, e.g. descirbed "as clean as a ballroom floor" which is a very odd description of Victorian London.
I hope that can help you, and don't worry about it! Your first essays are always really tricky to get to grips with, but I promise you if you keep at it you will get there in the end. By the end of year ten, you will probably be happy you don't have to sit this exam next year!
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Amber.xxx
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(Original post by entertainmyfaith)
what points have you got down so far??
Destructive and chaotic with the quotes "And then all of a sudden he broke out in a great flame of anger" and "bones were audibly shattered"
That's all I have and I don't know how to write it up and we need at least 3 paragraphs and so that would be one
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username4169146
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what do you think the word "evil" means? You could think about this in terms of defining its opposite "good," which should lead you to things like empathy. hyde is compared to an "ape" and therefore behaving due to instinct and desires, rather than empathy and concern for others. what's the difference between humans and apes? which came first in human evolution, your own animal desires or concern for others? therefore, certain feelings could be termed as more base, primal and even more your true personality than other behaviours which are possibly due to socialising constructs and helping society to succeed. any of that make sense?
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Amber.xxx
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(Original post by frogglet)
what do you think the word "evil" means? You could think about this in terms of defining its opposite "good," which should lead you to things like empathy. hyde is compared to an "ape" and therefore behaving due to instinct and desires, rather than empathy and concern for others. what's the difference between humans and apes? which came first in human evolution, your own animal desires or concern for others? therefore, certain feelings could be termed as more base, primal and even more your true personality than other behaviours which are possibly due to socialising constructs and helping society to succeed. any of that make sense?
Thanks that helps a lot is there any way you could put that in a whole paragraph using my thesis so it makes a bit more sense would be much appreciated thanks
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Megaman101
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Just say something along the lines that Hyde carries out nefarious acts therefore showing how evil he is. I dunno that’s all I can remember as I’m in Yr 13 and had Jekyll and Hyde for one of my lit books. In the end I got a 7 in lit and 8 in Lang. I think tour over complicating it tbh
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username4169146
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(Original post by Amber.xxx)
Thanks that helps a lot is there any way you could put that in a whole paragraph using my thesis so it makes a bit more sense would be much appreciated thanks
I asked questions to make you think so that you can write the essay .
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Amber.xxx
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(Original post by Megaman101)
Just say something along the lines that Hyde carries out nefarious acts therefore showing how evil he is. I dunno that’s all I can remember as I’m in Yr 13 and had Jekyll and Hyde for one of my lit books. In the end I got a 7 in lit and 8 in Lang. I think tour over complicating it tbh
Thanks but this is literally exactly what My English teacher has told me to do
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Amber.xxx
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(Original post by frogglet)
I asked questions to make you think so that you can write the essay .
Okieee thanks tho

(Original post by hannahw0255)
Hi I'm in year 11 and I had this question on my mock last year. I got 26/30 so I hope I can help:

Firstly use of dynamic verbs, such as "brandishing the cane", "stamping with his foot", "trampling" (same word used for the incident with the girl in chapter one).
Also consider allusions to primitive man such as "ape-like fury" and we also see this elsewhere in the novel with Hyde being described as "troglodytic" which basically means a cave man, and also Utterson says this after meeting Hyde, "God bless me, the man seems hardly human! Something troglodytic". Here the use of religious words shows that something unnerves Mr Utterson about Hyde in his soul, and that links to the strictly Christian society, but also the fact that Hyde does something to Utterson's soul in the way that people turn to religion in their moment of death. Also his sudden expression shows that something kust be wrong for a character that is usually describes as, "long, dark, dusty, dreary" in the opening lines. The primitive connotations also link to the context as it was around the same time as Charles Darwin's 'The Origin Of The Species' was published and people began to fear that if we had evolved from apes then, somehow, we might be able to evole backwards (called atavism). Hyde is the embodiment of this fear.
Also, the physical reaction people have to Hyde, and his physiognomy - is it his evil core that repulses people? Or merely his haunting appearance?
Consider also the fact that location in which Carew is murdered is, "brilliantly lit by the full moon", showing Hyde's daring. Also the moon links to the Gothic genre.
The fog mentioned at the start of the chapter is a motif synonymous with Hyde and tends to appear before or around the time he does - note Jekyll's lab is full of fog.
Other instances in the book with evil would obviously be the trampling of the girl with religious quotes, "like Satan", "it was hellish to see" etc. But for top marks you really want to consider themes and deeper meanings to the book, e.g. the evil within us all (as in we all have our own Hyde) "man is not truly one but truly two", and perhaps the evil setting such as in The Search for Mr Hyde, the tension that is created as Jekyll hears effectively a murderer coming towards him (sibilance in "the steps drew swiftly nearer and swelled out suddenly", and the eeriness of London, e.g. descirbed "as clean as a ballroom floor" which is a very odd description of Victorian London.
I hope that can help you, and don't worry about it! Your first essays are always really tricky to get to grips with, but I promise you if you keep at it you will get there in the end. By the end of year ten, you will probably be happy you don't have to sit this exam next year!
Omg thank u sooo much this has helped a lot I hope I pass and this is really good so thanks
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lucexo-1
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I can't remember exactly what I put in my essay, but it was something along the lines of the quote 'brandished a cane' is a metaphor of good being overpowered by evil which foreshadows Hyde taking over Jekyll to the point where he is mostly Hyde and ends up killing himself; 'brandished' is a verb connoting violence and threat (a representation of the evil and repressed desires of Victorian society which Hyde represents) whilst a cane is typically used to help elderly people and support them (a representation of good/reputation aiding Victorian gentlemen in their lives) so it is ironic that the cane is what Hyde uses to kill Carew. Ultimately this quote foreshadows that although Jekyll tries to live up to the expectations of a Victorian gentleman and live a perfect life representing all the good of man, he will be unable to maintain this good and be overtaken by the inevitable evil of Hyde. You can link this to where Hyde 'trampled calmly' over the young girl in chapter 1 showing that evil is a prominent force throughout the novel (also another juxtaposition of good vs evil- Stevenson uses a lot of these throughout it might be a good idea to find these) and is used by Stevenson to criticise the expectations of Victorian society, that even in a society with 'perfect' gentlemen who publicly repress their desires evil is still dominant and is arguably worsened as the evil within eventually builds up and is released. Hope this helps! I got a 9 in English GCSE and studied Romeo and Juliet, Jekyll and Hyde and Animal Farm if you have any questions
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Amber.xxx
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Aah your such a life saver thank you soo much we havent started studying macbeth yet but I'll let you know when we are because I mean if you got a 9 why not but thanks this helps A LOT
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lucexo-1
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(Original post by Amber.xxx)
Aah your such a life saver thank you soo much we havent started studying macbeth yet but I'll let you know when we are because I mean if you got a 9 why not but thanks this helps A LOT
no worries glad you found it useful! good luck with your gcses
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username5008580
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(Original post by hannahw0255)
Hi I'm in year 11 and I had this question on my mock last year. I got 26/30 so I hope I can help:

Firstly use of dynamic verbs, such as "brandishing the cane", "stamping with his foot", "trampling" (same word used for the incident with the girl in chapter one).
Also consider allusions to primitive man such as "ape-like fury" and we also see this elsewhere in the novel with Hyde being described as "troglodytic" which basically means a cave man, and also Utterson says this after meeting Hyde, "God bless me, the man seems hardly human! Something troglodytic". Here the use of religious words shows that something unnerves Mr Utterson about Hyde in his soul, and that links to the strictly Christian society, but also the fact that Hyde does something to Utterson's soul in the way that people turn to religion in their moment of death. Also his sudden expression shows that something kust be wrong for a character that is usually describes as, "long, dark, dusty, dreary" in the opening lines. The primitive connotations also link to the context as it was around the same time as Charles Darwin's 'The Origin Of The Species' was published and people began to fear that if we had evolved from apes then, somehow, we might be able to evole backwards (called atavism). Hyde is the embodiment of this fear.
Also, the physical reaction people have to Hyde, and his physiognomy - is it his evil core that repulses people? Or merely his haunting appearance?
Consider also the fact that location in which Carew is murdered is, "brilliantly lit by the full moon", showing Hyde's daring. Also the moon links to the Gothic genre.
The fog mentioned at the start of the chapter is a motif synonymous with Hyde and tends to appear before or around the time he does - note Jekyll's lab is full of fog.
Other instances in the book with evil would obviously be the trampling of the girl with religious quotes, "like Satan", "it was hellish to see" etc. But for top marks you really want to consider themes and deeper meanings to the book, e.g. the evil within us all (as in we all have our own Hyde) "man is not truly one but truly two", and perhaps the evil setting such as in The Search for Mr Hyde, the tension that is created as Jekyll hears effectively a murderer coming towards him (sibilance in "the steps drew swiftly nearer and swelled out suddenly", and the eeriness of London, e.g. descirbed "as clean as a ballroom floor" which is a very odd description of Victorian London.
I hope that can help you, and don't worry about it! Your first essays are always really tricky to get to grips with, but I promise you if you keep at it you will get there in the end. By the end of year ten, you will probably be happy you don't have to sit this exam next year!
(Original post by Amber.xxx)
Aah your such a life saver thank you soo much we havent started studying macbeth yet but I'll let you know when we are because I mean if you got a 9 why not but thanks this helps A LOT
If you want to make it better, talk about Sigmund Freud's Psychoanalytical Theory of the id, ego and superego. Be aware that Freud published this after Jekyll and Hyde was published and that Freud was clearly unknown to Stevenson. There was a zeitgeist at the time and the 'unconscious' was among an innovative new way of thinking. You could say that Stevenson had an early idea of the 'unconscious' and this is represented through using Hyde as a metaphor of the 'unconscious'. Hyde represents the id, our innate instinctive impulses and primary processes/desires. The super ego is the part of a person's mind that acts as a self-critical conscience, reflecting social standards learned from parents and teachers. Jekyll represents the ego, what reflects us and our actual mentality. It is the intermediate between the id and the super ego. For example, with Utterson, his ego is more leaning towards the super ego rather than the id. With Jekyll, you can say ego is more leaning to the id, thus why he created Hyde. I'm not sure if you'll understand this, it is a critical perspective, but in terms of evil, adding on to what lucexo-1 said, that "even in a society with 'perfect' gentlemen who publicly repress their desires evil is still dominant and is arguably worsened as the evil within eventually builds up and is released", you can say their evil is dominant and innate (part of their id). Also the "'perfect' gentlemen who publicly repress their desires evil" could allude to Mr Enfield. Mr Enfield in the beginning 'was coming home from some place at the end of the world'. This can suggest he was doing stuff in the night (it is in Soho) which can show his ego is also somewhat leaning to the id but then he is also a bit more respectable so his leaning to the id is not as much as Jekyll's. This also reflects the theme of 'duality of man' which critically, can be linked to another pyschoanalytic theory which is further explored later in the novella. If you understand this than great, if not don't worry.

In terms of general tips for Jekyll and Hyde, write about social and historical context, authorial intent, themes, genre, form, structure, motifs and use a sophisticated repertoire of vocabulary. If you really want to stretch yourself, talking about religious imagery (context is Stevenson's Scottish Calvinist upbringing) and refer to the King James Bible (use bible quotes). Talk about alternate perspectives and meanings. I.e. from the biblical perspective, from the psychonanalytic perspective, from the patriachal perspective (femininity)...
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Davy611
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Hi. BBC Bitesize offer relevant support for this question here:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/guide...xsg/revision/1

The Carew Murder Case, and this particular extract especially, is one of the most famous sections of the novella. A question about Hyde's evil, connected to this extract, would be a real gift. Nevertheless, it's a good one to start with.
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lucexo-1
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(Original post by AnonymousGuest)
If you want to make it better, talk about Sigmund Freud's Psychoanalytical Theory of the id, ego and superego. Be aware that Freud published this after Jekyll and Hyde was published and that Freud was clearly unknown to Stevenson. There was a zeitgeist at the time and the 'unconscious' was among an innovative new way of thinking. You could say that Stevenson had an early idea of the 'unconscious' and this is represented through using Hyde as a metaphor of the 'unconscious'. Hyde represents the id, our innate instinctive impulses and primary processes/desires. The super ego is the part of a person's mind that acts as a self-critical conscience, reflecting social standards learned from parents and teachers. Jekyll represents the ego, what reflects us and our actual mentality. It is the intermediate between the id and the super ego. For example, with Utterson, his ego is more leaning towards the super ego rather than the id. With Jekyll, you can say ego is more leaning to the id, thus why he created Hyde. I'm not sure if you'll understand this, it is a critical perspective, but in terms of evil, adding on to what lucexo-1 said, that "even in a society with 'perfect' gentlemen who publicly repress their desires evil is still dominant and is arguably worsened as the evil within eventually builds up and is released", you can say their evil is dominant and innate (part of their id). Also the "'perfect' gentlemen who publicly repress their desires evil" could allude to Mr Enfield. Mr Enfield in the beginning 'was coming home from some place at the end of the world'. This can suggest he was doing stuff in the night (it is in Soho) which can show his ego is also somewhat leaning to the id but then he is also a bit more respectable so his leaning to the id is not as much as Jekyll's. This also reflects the theme of 'duality of man' which critically, can be linked to another pyschoanalytic theory which is further explored later in the novella. If you understand this than great, if not don't worry.

In terms of general tips for Jekyll and Hyde, write about social and historical context, authorial intent, themes, genre, form, structure, motifs and use a sophisticated repertoire of vocabulary. If you really want to stretch yourself, talking about religious imagery (context is Stevenson's Scottish Calvinist upbringing) and refer to the King James Bible (use bible quotes). Talk about alternate perspectives and meanings. I.e. from the biblical perspective, from the psychonanalytic perspective, from the patriachal perspective (femininity)...
Yessss!! We're learning about the Freud approach at A-Level in relation to Othello and I was thinking how perfectly it fits in Jekyll and Hyde! Unfortunately we didn't do this at GCSE but I think this would defo lead to a high mark, even though critical theory isn't in the mark scheme for GCSE as far as I'm aware this shows a very deep understanding of the novella and therefore a high band/mark answer.
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Davy611
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Critical theory isn't usually taught at GCSE level but, you're right, including it in a way that shows you understand will help you to access the higher marks.
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username5008580
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(Original post by lucexo-1)
Yessss!! We're learning about the Freud approach at A-Level in relation to Othello and I was thinking how perfectly it fits in Jekyll and Hyde! Unfortunately we didn't do this at GCSE but I think this would defo lead to a high mark, even though critical theory isn't in the mark scheme for GCSE as far as I'm aware this shows a very deep understanding of the novella and therefore a high band/mark answer.
Considering I learned it in Year 9 or 10(I can't remember) and I remember it now in Year 11 without revising, i'm surprised. I need to make sure I don't go on about it in the exams but also what if the examiner has no idea about psychoanalysis in literature? The whole thing would seem like a nonsensical waffle.
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