definition and examples of experiments-psychology

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davesantana
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im stuck on what quasi-experiments are and need some examples.

i understand the strengths and weaknesses of the rest.

could you give me examples for lab, field, natural and quasi.
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idkanyusername
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Quasi experiments are experiments where the variables are already there so you don’t need to change anything. For example gender- you can’t manipulate gender unless u change the group of people. Or a better example. Sperry looked at people who had epilepsy and were treated for it. This is a quasi experiment as all of them shared a same characteristic (them having epilepsy.) it’s just a variable that exists pretty much.
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idkanyusername
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Lab experiment - milgrams shock study
Natural experiment - observations etc where u have no input.
Field experiment- sheriffs cave experiment
Quasi - sperrys epilepsy (phantom limb syndrome)
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davesantana
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(Original post by idkanyusername)
Quasi experiments are experiments where the variables are already there so you don’t need to change anything. For example gender- you can’t manipulate gender unless u change the group of people. Or a better example. Sperry looked at people who had epilepsy and were treated for it. This is a quasi experiment as all of them shared a same characteristic (them having epilepsy.) it’s just a variable that exists pretty much.
oh ye i get that. whats the difference between quasi and natural. it says natural has preexisting variables, which means thats the same as quasi right
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username5014120
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(Original post by zedius)
oh ye i get that. whats the difference between quasi and natural. it says natural has preexisting variables, which means thats the same as quasi right
Natural is a before and after effect that is naturally occurring eg the effect of a hurricane - it is taking advantage of a naturally occurring event and recording the effect of that event

Quasi is like an independent groups study but the only difference is you can’t choose which participants go in which groups because they are set in place - you can’t choose which gender to put someone in for a study because they already have their gender naturally (same would go for age, first language etc.)
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davesantana
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(Original post by Hannahlucek)
Natural is a before and after effect that is naturally occurring eg the effect of a hurricane - it is taking advantage of a naturally occurring event and recording the effect of that event

Quasi is like an independent groups study but the only difference is you can’t choose which participants go in which groups because they are set in place - you can’t choose which gender to put someone in for a study because they already have their gender naturally (same would go for age, first language etc.)
now i get it, cheers
(Original post by idkanyusername)
Lab experiment - milgrams shock study
Natural experiment - observations etc where u have no input.
Field experiment- sheriffs cave experiment
Quasi - sperrys epilepsy (phantom limb syndrome)
only in y12 so we havent started examples of these but i'll watch vids and understand them
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idkanyusername
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(Original post by davesantana)
only in y12 so we havent started examples of these but i'll watch vids and understand them
O right sorry some of those were GCSE topics aswell but yes go over them.
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davesantana
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(Original post by idkanyusername)
O right sorry some of those were GCSE topics aswell but yes go over them.
do u mind quickly explaining inter observer reliability. its when 2 or more observers observing behavior

my teacher made us write this down and idk what it is
'-establish highly operationalised categories
-familiarize them-self with the behavioral categories
-observe same behaviors at same time
-compare data after recording it. if high correlation then its reliable.
-require a 0.80 correlation.'


especially the last '0.8' one
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idkanyusername
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(Original post by davesantana)
do u mind quickly explaining inter observer reliability. its when 2 or more observers observing behavior

my teacher made us write this down and idk what it is
'-establish highly operationalised categories
-familiarize them-self with the behavioral categories
-observe same behaviors at same time
-compare data after recording it. if high correlation then its reliable.
-require a 0.80 correlation.'


especially the last '0.8' one
Yes of course.
Operationalising categories is making them specific. So when you have two observers, they have to have made behavioral categories and not just assume a behaviour. For example when observing students attention spans in class you would need to identify what you would consider as not paying attention. So you would make a table of categories such as ‘doodling’ or ‘looking around’ and note down how many times a student does this.
The observers have to watch the same thing at the same time but at a distance from each other so they don’t note down whenever the other observer does.
When both observers have tallied up the number of each behaviour they compare it with each other to see if it’s similar.
When that’s done they plot the data on a graph to observe correlation. That’s where the 0.8 comes in. A 1 positive correlation is a straight constant line from the x axis and y axis. A -1 negative correlation is the opposite. The further the data moves away from the line of 1 or -1 the weaker the correlation. A 0.8 correlation is seen as strong therefore the inter observer reliability is correct.
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idkanyusername
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Hope that helped <3
Ask if you didn’t understand something
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davesantana
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(Original post by idkanyusername)
Hope that helped <3
Ask if you didn’t understand something
man thanks a lot im gonna read thru that. so i made all my notes on research methods(what we've been doing since september). do i attempt questions now? or just memorise the content
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idkanyusername
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(Original post by davesantana)
man thanks a lot im gonna read thru that. so i made all my notes on research methods(what we've been doing since september). do i attempt questions now? or just memorise the content
What parts of research methods have you done. Also if there’s anything calculations defo do questions over and over again. But practice research methods ALL the time it’s a big topic in all the psychology papers
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