valtrbl123
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So I'm starting to write up my English NEA but I'm not sure on how/what I should start off saying in the introduction. Any tips on how to write intros?
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absolutelysprout
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what exam board are you on?:holmes:
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valtrbl123
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(Original post by entertainmyfaith)
what exam board are you on?:holmes:
AQA
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absolutelysprout
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(Original post by valtrbl123)
AQA
spec a or b? my teachers have done a little nea workshop w me recently and we did one session on writing strong intros, can share my notes on that if you'd like? though if you're on spec a i know the nea'll be different:dontknow:
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valtrbl123
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(Original post by entertainmyfaith)
spec a or b? my teachers have done a little nea workshop w me recently and we did one session on writing strong intros, can share my notes on that if you'd like? though if you're on spec a i know the nea'll be different:dontknow:
ah I'm doing spec a
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absolutelysprout
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(Original post by valtrbl123)
ah I'm doing spec a
do you still want the intro notes?
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valtrbl123
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(Original post by entertainmyfaith)
do you still want the intro notes?
yes please, it's better than nothing tbh
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absolutelysprout
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so in my notes i have:
you need to know where you stand and what you're going to argue
directly addressing the question, setting up tone
stance should have brief justification

and my teacher told us about the DDR triangle for writing effective intros:
discuss- where you introduce the key terms of the question showing you are fully aware of the given theme/issue/area. often constitutes simple rewording of question.
define- define key terms in question showing that you appreciate a range of ways to interpret the topic.
refine- state clearly how you interpret the question for this particular essay, focusing on the specific text- ensure final sentence of intro firmly establishes key argument.

she gave us also an exemplar intro paragraph responding to the statement: 'in crime writing, there are always lawless settings'-
Spoiler:
Show

In crime writing, writers often parallel the moral and social stability of characters within the very setting in which they exist. The setting is an important narrative tool used by writers, not only to create a sense of where and when a narrative takes place, but can also serve to establish an organic link to the motivations of a character. By suggesting that all settings are ‘lawless’ could be focusing on a writer’s intrinsic need to establish the instability of society and the moral strings which govern characters. In Atonement, there is the significant use of the lawless and immoral backdrop of war in Part Two, however McEwan uses the backdrop of the Tallis household as the setting where the central crime of the narrative occurs. Although, not stereotypically ‘lawless’ the social pretences of the setting create an abhorrent and stifling setting.


hope this has been useful to you, sorry if it hasn't
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valtrbl123
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(Original post by entertainmyfaith)
so in my notes i have:
you need to know where you stand and what you're going to argue
directly addressing the question, setting up tone
stance should have brief justification

and my teacher told us about the DDR triangle for writing effective intros:
discuss- where you introduce the key terms of the question showing you are fully aware of the given theme/issue/area. often constitutes simple rewording of question.
define- define key terms in question showing that you appreciate a range of ways to interpret the topic.
refine- state clearly how you interpret the question for this particular essay, focusing on the specific text- ensure final sentence of intro firmly establishes key argument.

she gave us also an exemplar intro paragraph responding to the statement: 'in crime writing, there are always lawless settings'-
Spoiler:
Show

In crime writing, writers often parallel the moral and social stability of characters within the very setting in which they exist. The setting is an important narrative tool used by writers, not only to create a sense of where and when a narrative takes place, but can also serve to establish an organic link to the motivations of a character. By suggesting that all settings are ‘lawless’ could be focusing on a writer’s intrinsic need to establish the instability of society and the moral strings which govern characters. In Atonement, there is the significant use of the lawless and immoral backdrop of war in Part Two, however McEwan uses the backdrop of the Tallis household as the setting where the central crime of the narrative occurs. Although, not stereotypically ‘lawless’ the social pretences of the setting create an abhorrent and stifling setting.


hope this has been useful to you, sorry if it hasn't
Thank you so much for this, our teacher hasn't gone through stuff like this with us *sigh* so this is really helpful
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