Summer Rent.... but the house hasn't been built yet?! Watch

Schmeevey
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hi

I was supposed to be moving into a house with 3 friends, and the parents of one of them bought it and are the landlords. This house was already built and at the time we agreed to pay half rent for the summer months because we could live there in the summer if we wanted to. We hadn't all signed a contract so it wasnt valid.

Now the parents are upgrading the house to one that hasn't been built yet. They are still asking for half rent even though we cannot live in it. Its not going to be ready until september. Is this right??

Should they be asking for half rent only if we can live in it...?? Although they ARE upgrading it out of the goodness of their hearts...

help!
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evil groove
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Absolutely not. They are totally taking advantage. Do not pay a thing.
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Sijia
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That's not fair! As you haven't signed a contract, they can't in any legal way coerce you to pay.
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evil groove
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(Original post by Sijia)
That's not fair! As you haven't signed a contract, they can't in any legal way coerce you to pay.
I entirely expect that they'll try to coerce her emotionally :rolleyes: Don't be having any of it, though. It's an expensive business already, rent, without having to senselessly pay extras. If, when you explain the situation from your POV, they can't understand how unreasonable they're being then I would seriously reconsider living in that house.
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Schmeevey
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Hmm yeah I'm going to let them know that the summer rent thing isnt fair- but I need a strong argument- i cant just say *its not fair* etc. what should i say??
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Sijia
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Say that you agreed to pay half the summer rent on the condition that you were allowed to live in the house. But since you are no longer able to do that, then you are by no means obligated to pay said rent. Why would you pay for something you can't enjoy?
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Schmeevey
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but for the majority of people who pay summer rent - are they allowed to stay in the house anyway?? been trying to look up some old threads- and it seems like that
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evil groove
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(Original post by Schmeevey)
but for the majority of people who pay summer rent - are they allowed to stay in the house anyway?? been trying to look up some old threads- and it seems like that
Re-phrase, please
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Schmeevey
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^sorry lol. what i meant was for students who are required to pay summer rent - are these students actually allowed to live in the house over the summer if they want to? or are they supposed to pay summer rent knowing that they are not allowed to stay in the house over the summer.

i dont really know how the summer rent thing works tbh

thanks!
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kftjkp
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Summer rent is meant as a retainer, so that you can move your stuff in over the summer and it will be there ready for you come September. It depends on the landlord, but most charge full rent if you are going to live in it through the summer. Since the house won't be built, thus no where to leave your possessions, it is hardly fair for them to charge you for rent through the summer.

Hope this helps - I'm sure there is someone knocking about with a bit my knowledge on this situation than me, but don't get pushed around by them - stand firm.
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Schmeevey
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(Original post by kftjkp)
Summer rent is meant as a retainer, so that you can move your stuff in over the summer and it will be there ready for you come September. It depends on the landlord, but most charge full rent if you are going to live in it through the summer. Since the house won't be built, thus no where to leave your possessions, it is hardly fair for them to charge you for rent through the summer.

Hope this helps - I'm sure there is someone knocking about with a bit my knowledge on this situation than me, but don't get pushed around by them - stand firm.
BUT lol, i left my possessions in the first house that is built already (the landlord said we can move it into the old house and that she will move our stuff into the new house when its ready). i think they own both the houses right now or have some kind of arrangement where we can keep our things in the old house and that they will move it later themself.

they also said that they probably wont be having a contract because they want it to be like a family home rather than student accomodation. should i press on for the contract? and shouldn't we be paying summer rent only when the contract is signed???! confused!

thanks again really ppreciate it
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Persipan
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When I was a student (which, actually, was a while ago) I did some rather daft things in relation to housing - things which I look back on in horror, especially since I've worked in the housing sector. Things like living in a house in my second year which didn't have my name on the tenancy, as I took up someone else's place when she decided not to live there atfter all... Fortunately things all worked out well, but they might just as easily not have.

My advice would be to press - politely - for a written contract. In actual fact, a contract legally exists as soon as you move in, even if you don't have any agreement on paper - though the precise nature of it would depend on whether the people who own the house are living in it (in which case you'd be a lodger) or not (which would make you a tenant). I'd point out to them that since an agreement will exist anyway, it would be just as well to have it actually writen down so that everyone involved knows what their rights and responsibilities are.

At a guess, it sounds as though these people aren't experienced landlords and either don't know precisely what they're doing, or are trying to avoid certain technicalities (e.g. the possibility of having to register the house as a 'House in Multiple Occupation' with the local authority, if it's sufficiently large ) by saying "oh,no, we're all one big happy family..." It doesn't need to be a problem, but if I were you I would be as professional as possible in dealing with them, in the hope that it'll cause them to be professional in return.

So far as paying 'summer rent' goes, I suspect their argument is that you're paying a retainer to reserve the accommodation for next year. Whether or not you choose to call their bluff depends on how much you want to live there and how hard it would be for you to find somewhere else to live if they tell you to pay it or you won't be moving in - and whether or not they do that, of course, also depends on how hard it would be for them to find someone else to take your place. This isn't really my area of expertise, though, so you could get further advice from the CAB or your uni accommodation office.
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Schmeevey
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(Original post by Persipan)
When I was a student (which, actually, was a while ago) I did some rather daft things in relation to housing - things which I look back on in horror, especially since I've worked in the housing sector. Things like living in a house in my second year which didn't have my name on the tenancy, as I took up someone else's place when she decided not to live there atfter all... Fortunately things all worked out well, but they might just as easily not have.

My advice would be to press - politely - for a written contract. In actual fact, a contract legally exists as soon as you move in, even if you don't have any agreement on paper - though the precise nature of it would depend on whether the people who own the house are living in it (in which case you'd be a lodger) or not (which would make you a tenant). I'd point out to them that since an agreement will exist anyway, it would be just as well to have it actually writen down so that everyone involved knows what their rights and responsibilities are.

At a guess, it sounds as though these people aren't experienced landlords and either don't know precisely what they're doing, or are trying to avoid certain technicalities (e.g. the possibility of having to register the house as a 'House in Multiple Occupation' with the local authority, if it's sufficiently large ) by saying "oh,no, we're all one big happy family..." It doesn't need to be a problem, but if I were you I would be as professional as possible in dealing with them, in the hope that it'll cause them to be professional in return.

So far as paying 'summer rent' goes, I suspect their argument is that you're paying a retainer to reserve the accommodation for next year. Whether or not you choose to call their bluff depends on how much you want to live there and how hard it would be for you to find somewhere else to live if they tell you to pay it or you won't be moving in - and whether or not they do that, of course, also depends on how hard it would be for them to find someone else to take your place. This isn't really my area of expertise, though, so you could get further advice from the CAB or your uni accommodation office.
yep i want to be as professional and mature as possible of course, but i want everything to be fair and square in everybody's situation. the three people i am living with are 3 of the most loyal and loveliest people ive met at uni, and i can trust them wholeheartedly, so i still will be moving in, even if i have to pay summer rent. i just everything to be correct and fair but im not experienced in any of this, so im asking for help.

thank u so much for you're help
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evil groove
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(Original post by Persipan)
When I was a student (which, actually, was a while ago) I did some rather daft things in relation to housing - things which I look back on in horror, especially since I've worked in the housing sector. Things like living in a house in my second year which didn't have my name on the tenancy, as I took up someone else's place when she decided not to live there atfter all... Fortunately things all worked out well, but they might just as easily not have.

My advice would be to press - politely - for a written contract. In actual fact, a contract legally exists as soon as you move in, even if you don't have any agreement on paper - though the precise nature of it would depend on whether the people who own the house are living in it (in which case you'd be a lodger) or not (which would make you a tenant). I'd point out to them that since an agreement will exist anyway, it would be just as well to have it actually writen down so that everyone involved knows what their rights and responsibilities are.

At a guess, it sounds as though these people aren't experienced landlords and either don't know precisely what they're doing, or are trying to avoid certain technicalities (e.g. the possibility of having to register the house as a 'House in Multiple Occupation' with the local authority, if it's sufficiently large ) by saying "oh,no, we're all one big happy family..." It doesn't need to be a problem, but if I were you I would be as professional as possible in dealing with them, in the hope that it'll cause them to be professional in return.

So far as paying 'summer rent' goes, I suspect their argument is that you're paying a retainer to reserve the accommodation for next year. Whether or not you choose to call their bluff depends on how much you want to live there and how hard it would be for you to find somewhere else to live if they tell you to pay it or you won't be moving in - and whether or not they do that, of course, also depends on how hard it would be for them to find someone else to take your place. This isn't really my area of expertise, though, so you could get further advice from the CAB or your uni accommodation office.
Excellent advice to which it would be difficult for me to add
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Paeony
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As has been said, get a contract, and make sure that they're adhering to the various rules for whatever size of household is going to be living there. Things go wrong in shared houses, and however 'friendly' you all are now you really can't rely on that being the situation all year. Protect yourself as much as possible, whoever you're renting from.

Personally, at the moment, I'd be far more worried about what's going to happen in September if the house isn't ready - I've *never* heard of a new build that's been finished on time. I'd be finding out what their contingency plans are should the house not be fit for habitation come September time ...
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Schmeevey
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(Original post by Paeony)
As has been said, get a contract, and make sure that they're adhering to the various rules for whatever size of household is going to be living there. Things go wrong in shared houses, and however 'friendly' you all are now you really can't rely on that being the situation all year. Protect yourself as much as possible, whoever you're renting from.

Personally, at the moment, I'd be far more worried about what's going to happen in September if the house isn't ready - I've *never* heard of a new build that's been finished on time. I'd be finding out what their contingency plans are should the house not be fit for habitation come September time ...
thanks for the advice, yup i will email them now and ask whats going to happen if the house isnt ready.

What do you think about the summer rent situation- should i pay it or not?
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Paeony
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(Original post by Schmeevey)


thanks for the advice, yup i will email them now and ask whats going to happen if the house isnt ready.

What do you think about the summer rent situation- should i pay it or not?
I think much the same as Persipan - you could try to 'call their bluff' but that could backfire. The situation is complicated by the fact that you've got no contract ... You need to think about whether you want to live in this house or whether this has started warning bells ringing. But, if you do decide to live there, please, please get some kind of contract - it protects you as much as it protects the landlord.
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