University of Edinburgh law LLB for graduates... Watch

YankeeUK2008
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Is this a good program? Or would I be just as better off going to University of London for my LLB? Thanks.
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River85
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What do you mean by "good programme"? Do you plan on qualifying as a solicitor or barrister? If so, where?
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YankeeUK2008
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(Original post by River85)
What do you mean by "good programme"? Do you plan on qualifying as a solicitor or barrister? If so, where?

1. I mean, is it reputable.

2. Scotland or England.
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L i b
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Of course, it's almost certainly the best law school in Scotland.

But realistically, Scottish law is in many ways different from the law of England and the rest of the English-speaking world. As such, they are two different subjects, and taking one will not enable you to practise in the other jurisdiction without conversion courses and a great deal of hassle.

So ultimately, I think you need to consider that issue first and foremost.

Secondly, what college of the University of London are you considering?
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River85
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Edinburgh is incredibly reputable. I usually have a group of "elite" law schools (Oxbridge, LSE, UCL, Durham, KCL and Nottingham). However, if I was to include Edinburgh (which I exclude for reasons to be discussed later) then it certainly wouldn't be out of place. Aberdeen also.

Anyway, you don't need to worry about Edinburgh being reputable. What is a concern is the issue Lib highlighted (and the reason I asked you where you were planning on studying). There's a difference between English and Scottish law. If you took your LLB at Edinburgh, but decided to practice in England (Wales or Northern Ireland) you'd need to convert. Same goes for if you took a degree in England and wanted to practice in Scotland.

I'd also be interested to know which London college you're thinking about. I'm assuming LSE, UCL or KCL?
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YankeeUK2008
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Secondly, what college of the University of London are you considering?

Well then that answers my question as to the reputation of the program.

It is the University of London LLB through the External System. But if it's no good, then I am not going to worry about it.

Edinburgh though, if it's that reputable, then I would love to attend. I wouldn't mind just staying in Glasgow. If it is in the same league as Oxbridge, then I think I would be fine.

But if it would be better to attend an English school and practice wherever, then that would be even better.
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YankeeUK2008
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However, if I was to include Edinburgh (which I exclude for reasons to be discussed later) then it certainly wouldn't be out of place. Aberdeen also
Care to discuss that now?
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River85
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Yes, but you can't attend an English university and practice in Scotland without converting so you need to think carefully.

I forgot to mention that an Edinburgh grad, should they choose to practice in England, is entitled to some exemptions from English Law Society exams but I don't know a great deal about that.

I forgot about UoL external programme......
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River85
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(Original post by YankeeUK2008)
Care to discuss that now?
What, why I don't usually include Edinburgh? I covered that in the final paragraph. It's the problem with the difference between English and Scottish law (and needing to convert). If I was to give the UK's elite law school's I'd certainly include Edinburgh. However, it's a little misleading including it amongst all of the English unis I listed (especially to someone who will be practicing in England).

Usually the people I discuss this with are looking to practice in England so I exclude Edinburgh. If you want to practice in Scotland, or are OK with converting to English law after your degree, then include Edinburgh in that list.
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Absinth
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Scottish degrees are four years I think. So would it not be more worth it to do an English degree (which is three years) and then do a one year conversion if you want to work in Scotland. It would then be four years in total, the equivalent time to complete a Scottish LLB. This way you'll be qualified to practice in both countries. If you do a degree from Edinburgh and convert to English law it would take longer...
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YankeeUK2008
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http://www.law.ed.ac.uk/ug/graduate.aspx

It's for graduates who wish to pursue law. I think it takes about two years.
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River85
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(Original post by YankeeUK2008)
http://www.law.ed.ac.uk/ug/graduate.aspx

It's for graduates who wish to pursue law. I think it takes about two years.
Yes, that's similar to England's Graduate Diploma in Law (a one year conversion course for grads from any discipline). Except one's Scottish law and one's English, obviously.
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YankeeUK2008
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There is a lot of information on the website about how it's an internationally respected degree, especially in Europe. Is this true? Is the school as a whole (U of E) well recognized in the EU?
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YankeeUK2008
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Yes, that's similar to England's Graduate Diploma in Law (a one year conversion course for grads from any discipline). Except one's Scottish law and one's English, obviously.
Wait. In England, it's a Diploma but in Scotland it's the LLB? Can you practice with a Diploma?
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River85
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(Original post by YankeeUK2008)
There is a lot of information on the website about how it's an internationally respected degree, especially in Europe. Is this true? Is the school as a whole (U of E) well recognized in the EU?
Edinburgh is very well respected internationally, you don't really need to worry about it. It's arguably as respected nationally as LSE, UCL, Durham and KCL. Probably more than Nottingham. On the continent it's far more recognised than many of the English elite unis.

(Original post by YankeeUK2008)
Wait. In England, it's a Diploma but in Scotland it's the LLB? Can you practice with a Diploma?
Yes you can practice with it. It's a one year course that "converts" a non-law degree into a law degree allowing the student to undertake the LPC/BVC (the next state of training) and eventually qualifiy as a solicitor or barrister.

It's just a name of a conversion course. Some universities call it the Common Professional Examination so don't think of it as a "diploma" as such. Edinburgh's programme is an accelerated degree which is basically an intensive LLB. In England and Wales the CPE/GDL is a conversion course that covers the core parts of English law in one year.

Why did you bring up Edinburgh's accelerated degree? I wouldn't advise a law graduate from a uni outside Scotland to undertake the accelerated degree. There are other ways of converting to Scottish law.

Have a look at this: -

http://www.lawscot.org.uk/training/requalifying.aspx
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urethrar
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I've heard you can do a Master's in Law -MA/LLM- without having an LLB/BA in Law.

i.e. you could do an LLM in Medical Law and ethics

is this true and has anyone done this??
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River85
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(Original post by urethrar)
I've heard you can do a Master's in Law -MA/LLM- without having an LLB/BA in Law.

i.e. you could do an LLM in Medical Law and ethics

is this true and has anyone done this??
It is true, yes, although you'd be expected to have a relevant undergrad degree or strong interest/work experience in the area.

It's not a qualifying law degree, however.
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layercake
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(Original post by River85)
It is true, yes, although you'd be expected to have a relevant undergrad degree or strong interest/work experience in the area.

It's not a qualifying law degree, however.

how is this possible though? surely you need the basic knowledge of law before specialising in a particular area.

also, does anyone know which law schools offer the LLM without the need to have done LLB?
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River85
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(Original post by layercake)
how is this possible though? surely you need the basic knowledge of law before specialising in a particular area.

also, does anyone know which law schools offer the LLM without the need to have done LLB?
Not necessarily. It's a specialised area (as in it only covers that part of law) and is taught from scratch. Many people wouldn't have covered medical law during an LLB anyway. Degrees such as those are useful for lawyers looking to specialise but are also useful for other professionals (such as healthcare professionals the medical law LLM).

I suggest you start a thread in the postgrad forum or law forum for more info. I considered doing one but I just don't have the time or money.

Anyway, you can search for a masters here

http://www.llm-guide.com/uk-ireland

There's also a discussion forum which I used to frequent quite often two years ago. It seems to have really gone downhill though (they are discussing the quality of LLM programmes by looking at rankings, not just any rankings but undergrad rankings! wtf?)
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DJKL
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Note, after your Scottish LLB you still need to take the Diploma in Legal Practice to progress to becoming a solicitor in Scotland.
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