swizz22
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Im struggling to decode what course to apply for at ucas. I was going to study econ but people are saying econ and management is better?
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someenglishguy
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I'd say it depends what you wish to get out of an economics degree. An Economics and Management degree would be more geared towards those studying economics with a career in business and the like in mind, and while you could still almost certainly go down that route with an Economics degree, it is not as specialised towards that route.

Personally that side of economics doesn't really interest me as much and I can't really see myself going down the route of business.
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swizz22
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(Original post by someenglishguy)
I'd say it depends what you wish to get out of an economics degree. An Economics and Management degree would be more geared towards those studying economics with a career in business and the like in mind, and while you could still almost certainly go down that route with an Economics degree, it is not as specialised towards that route.

Personally that side of economics doesn't really interest me as much and I can't really see myself going down the route of business.
(Original post by someenglishguy)
I'd say it depends what you wish to get out of an economics degree. An Economics and Management degree would be more geared towards those studying economics with a career in business and the like in mind, and while you could still almost certainly go down that route with an Economics degree, it is not as specialised towards that route.

Personally that side of economics doesn't really interest me as much and I can't really see myself going down the route of business.
What do you mean by the route of business in terms of jobs?
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someenglishguy
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(Original post by swizz22)
What do you mean by the route of business in terms of jobs?
It would be more geared towards wishing to go into business management, like managing a business and its operations.

Where were you considering studying?
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swizz22
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(Original post by someenglishguy)
It would be more geared towards wishing to go into business management, like managing a business and its operations.

Where were you considering studying?
Im planning on applying to royal holloway, Im not really sure what job i want to do when I'm older but I'm assuming something in finance or civil service. And also would it not be possible to work in business operations with a economics degree?
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Diplomatic
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Neither is better. Look at the modules of the degrees and see which course interests you more.

Pure economics tends to be more theoretical, so some people like the balance of econ and management since the latter gives them a break from theory heavy micro/macro/econometrics.

But it depends on the econ course, some are more applied than others and some give you the freedom to take quite a lot of optional modules which means you'll have the freedom to choose a balance that suits you.
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swizz22
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(Original post by Patagonia)
Neither is better. Look at the modules of the degrees and see which interests you more.

Pure economics tends to be more theoretical, so some people like the balance of econ and management since the latter gives them a break from theory heavy micro/macro/econometrics.

But it depends on the econ course, some are more applied than others and some give you the freedom to take quite a lot of optional modules which means you'll have the freedom to choose a balance that suits you.
Would the job prospects be the same and what kind of job prospects are there?
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someenglishguy
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(Original post by swizz22)
Im planning on applying to royal holloway, Im not really sure what job i want to do when I'm older but I'm assuming something in finance or civil service. And also would it not be possible to work in business operations with a economics degree?
It would definitely still be possible, yes, just E&M is more geared towards entering such areas as careers. For those two careers I'd think pure Economics would be better.

I haven't really looked into Royal Holloway as a university personally as it's a bit too close to home for me personally, so I couldn't really comment on them in specific.
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swizz22
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(Original post by someenglishguy)
It would definitely still be possible, yes, just E&M is more geared towards entering such areas as careers. For those two careers I'd think pure Economics would be better.

I haven't really looked into Royal Holloway as a university personally as it's a bit too close to home for me personally, so I couldn't really comment on them in specific.
Is there a lot of different career oportunities for studying econ beacause im not really sure what i wanna do when older? Thanks for the help bro.
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someenglishguy
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(Original post by swizz22)
Is there a lot of different career oportunities for studying econ beacause im not really sure what i wanna do when older? Thanks for the help bro.
There's a fair few career options it opens you up to - it's not just limited to finance, business management, civil service etc.
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Diplomatic
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(Original post by swizz22)
Would the job prospects be the same and what kind of job prospects are there?
Most grad jobs don't require a specific degree. So on the whole, yes.

The only exception I can think of potentially is if you want to be an economist. Some roles (the CS Fast Stream) requires 50% of your degree to be economics focused. It's usually still possible to meet that criteria with econ and management, though. Some pure econ master's courses also favour a pure econ bachelor's degree (think Oxbridge, UCL) because they're more theoretical.

But for both degrees, there are lots of job opportunities. Economist, strategy/operations consulting, accountancy, law, business development... many more.
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swizz22
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(Original post by Patagonia)
Most grad jobs don't require a specific degree. So on the whole, yes.

The only exception I can think of potentially is if you want to be an economist. Some roles (the CS Fast Stream) requires 50% of your degree to be economics focused. It's usually still possible to meet that criteria with econ and management, though. Some pure econ master's courses also favour a pure econ bachelor's degree (think Oxbridge, UCL) because they're more theoretical.

But for both degrees, there are lots of job opportunities. Economist, strategy/operations consulting, accountancy, law, business development... many more.
thank you. Lol this is a dumb question but what does an economist actually do?
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Quick-use
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(Original post by swizz22)
thank you. Lol this is a dumb question but what does an economist actually do?
https://www.google.com/search?q=what...obile&ie=UTF-8
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returnmigrant
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More about Applying for Economics here : https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki/Economics_Degree
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