Why do uk engineers earn less than us engineers?

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#1
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#1
i dont understand why engineers earn pretty much minimum wage straigth after uni, but if you get an eng degree in the US, you can instantly be employed with $80,000+ ($56,000 is us average wage)
is it something to do with economics ie less taxes (no healthcare) in the US
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ajj2000
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#2
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#2
Engineers in the uk don’t start on anything like minimum wage.
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confuzzledteen
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#3
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#3
yeah, basically; also due to the lower cost of living in the UK compared to the US. the higher wages in the US offset the higher cost of living they face.

"Overall, the cost of living in the U.K. is 6.51% lower than in the United States. Rent overall is about 27% lower in the U.K. You would need $5,856 per month to finance a modest lifestyle in London, compared to $7,760 for the equivalent lifestyle in New York City."
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#4
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(Original post by ajj2000)
Engineers in the uk don’t start on anything like minimum wage.
sorry i mean average wage like £25,000
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#5
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#5
(Original post by ajj2000)
Engineers in the uk don’t start on anything like minimum wage.
so how much do engineers earn in the UK then?
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ajj2000
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#6
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#6
(Original post by sadasdasfsfafg)
so how much do engineers earn in the UK then?
I think the average graduate starting salary is between £25000 and £33,000.
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AdamCor
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#7
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#7
Average salary in the US is $85,962 (£66,451.76 at current exchange rate)
https://www.indeed.com/salaries/engineer-Salaries

Average salary in the UK is £47,896
https://www.theengineer.co.uk/engineer-salary-uk-2018/

So why do they earn more in the US?
Because everything in the US costs a lot more, for example healthcare is absurdly expensive, even with insurance they might end up having absurd deductible amounts. Also you have to factor in how much money these engineers spend in their respective countries for education, however these amounts are almost the same, the US student loan system is drastically different to the UK (US has some private student loans, so they will charge a much higher interest, whereas the UK only has 3% real interest, and the money is taken out like a tax from your pay, and it defaults after 30 years).
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confuzzledteen
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#8
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#8
(Original post by sadasdasfsfafg)
so how much do engineers earn in the UK then?
Got this off a recent publication by SaveTheStudent, written in June 2019:

"While Graduate Recruitment Bureau puts the average salary for an Engineering graduate at £25,000, subject specialism can make a difference to your salary.

Graduates of Chemical Engineering earn an average of £27,696 in their first job, while Civil Engineers nab an average starting salary of £25,847."
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Justvisited
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#9
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#9
(Original post by confuzzledteen)
yeah, basically; also due to the lower cost of living in the UK compared to the US. the higher wages in the US offset the higher cost of living they face.

"Overall, the cost of living in the U.K. is 6.51% lower than in the United States. Rent overall is about 27% lower in the U.K. You would need $5,856 per month to finance a modest lifestyle in London, compared to $7,760 for the equivalent lifestyle in New York City."
Can you link to that quote please? (And don't say google it, it's always good practice to provide links to external citations)

Actually that surprises me - I had the general impression that if anything COL was lower in the US. Certainly for food, especially meat, and in fact for house prices and I therefore assumed rents also.

It's long been a saying that for electronic goods, the price in $ in the US is the same as the price in £ in the UK (which therefore costs 30% more for example).
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ibyghee
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#10
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#10
Well, its complicated. The people who dont find the good company dont earn well. But the people in UK who find the golden company and hit the right goal. Earn more than what a person in US would consider top company. So what I'm trying to say, the top 10% in UK earn more than top 10% in US. But the average engineer in US earns more than UK. This is because there are much more engineering companies in US for people to choose from. Meaning not many engineering graduates are left out without an engineering job.
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A Rolling Stone
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#11
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(Original post by AdamCor)
Average salary in the US is $85,962 (£66,451.76 at current exchange rate)
https://www.indeed.com/salaries/engineer-Salaries

Average salary in the UK is £47,896
https://www.theengineer.co.uk/engineer-salary-uk-2018/

So why do they earn more in the US?
Because everything in the US costs a lot more, for example healthcare is absurdly expensive, even with insurance they might end up having absurd deductible amounts. Also you have to factor in how much money these engineers spend in their respective countries for education, however these amounts are almost the same, the US student loan system is drastically different to the UK (US has some private student loans, so they will charge a much higher interest, whereas the UK only has 3% real interest, and the money is taken out like a tax from your pay, and it defaults after 30 years).
you also need to mention working hours. 14 days annual leave and 45 hour work weeks as standard
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confuzzledteen
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#12
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#12
(Original post by Justvisited)
Can you link to that quote please? (And don't say google it, it's always good practice to provide links to external citations)

Actually that surprises me - I had the general impression that if anything COL was lower in the US. Certainly for food, especially meat, and in fact for house prices and I therefore assumed rents also.

It's long been a saying that for electronic goods, the price in $ in the US is the same as the price in £ in the UK (which therefore costs 30% more for example).
Oh, sorry!
https://www.investopedia.com/ask/ans...-us-and-uk.asp
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kkboyk
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#13
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#13
Engineers arent protected title just like lawyer and dentists ar in the UK. This means anyone who does a job even slightly technical job calls them selves an engineer (e.g. the blokes that come to fix your internet are often called engineers). These aren't highly skilled jobs and get paid accordingly, but they get grouped together with higher paid actual engineers and make the averages much lower.

The median salary for a chartered engineer (which is a protected title and typically requires >5 years experience) is around £63k (should be about $77-79k), which is still a bit low compared to the US but not as much as before. We also need to take into consideration that people in the US work much longer hours in general and have fewer holidays. But then so, US will still have a higher pay as they're more valued over there.
Last edited by kkboyk; 2 years ago
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