I'm thinking about dropping out of University Watch

QuackingDuck1
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If you've been following me, it would be surprising. If you don't that's fine. I studied BTEC L3 Extended Diploma in Applied Science and I got D*D*D. I got into Lancaster University and I am studying Computer Science. It has only been 5 weeks that I have been at the uni. Now I am thinking about dropping out?!

Let me explain why... I am a beginner in the field with little prior experience in Python., but that's all. I chose this course as they accept complete beginners with no foundation year and this is a great uni to study.
I thought that you'll need a degree to get in this field and the course would be great for beginners as they'll teach you from scratch. From it, you'll graduate and get a job. But from my research, this isn't true. There are self-taught programmers who can get a job.

Learning to program is fine but there are other modules in the course. For me, I have just been getting piles of notes I need to write, revision I need to do and further reading I have to do for each module. I've not been getting enough time to socialise and when I do I just feel knackered. Also in order for yourself to get a good resume when you graduate, you're supposed to do side projects as well. Because of my current situation, I don't think that I'm qualified to apply for a software engineering internship for summer next year. I'll be having two tests soon and I have been revising, but nothing is going in.

The reason why I'm considering to drop out is the content of the modules. After hours of revising, I just haven't gotten anything in at all. Since I started this course I've been worrying if I'm going to pass my 1st year. Before I felt fine about my progress, but I know nothing (like Jon Snow). Now I'm worried as nothing is going in... Then I thought, why I am forcing myself and feeling stress to study the other modules that I'm gonna forget after the exam next year? Like my GCSE exams, but I'm going into debt and throwing money away in this case. Do I even need it to get a job? Self-taught programmers don't learn the content from these modules and still get a job. I honestly think now, that I'm wasting money, energy and my time over this course. I used to be optimistic and motivated, but now I just feel lost. questioning myself if uni is worth it.

If I do drop-out, I'll definitely save money and time but I'll have to pay back the loan and debt. I did plan to go the self-taught route or do a programming course even if I failed or drop-out.
I don't know if it's just me, I just don't think that this is worth it. I could literally just get a part-time job to pay off the debt and self-teach myself in my free time instead. Learn languages, complete 4 or so projects, put them in a resume and apply for a software development job. And develop my career from there. What are your thoughts?
Last edited by QuackingDuck1; 1 week ago
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Subhaan*786
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(Original post by QuackingDuck1)
If you've been following me, it would be surprising. If you don't that's fine. I studied BTEC L3 Extended Diploma in Applied Science and I got D*D*D. I got into Lancaster University and I am studying Computer Science. It has only been 5 weeks that I have been at the uni. Now I am thinking about dropping out?!

Let me explain why... I am a beginner in the field with little prior experience in Python., but that's all. I chose this course as they accept complete beginners with no foundation year and this is a great uni to study.
I thought that you'll need a degree to get in this field and the course would be great for beginners as they'll teach you from scratch. From it, you'll graduate and get a job. But from my research, this isn't true. There are self-taught programmers who can get a job.

Learning to program is fine but there are other modules in the course. For me, I have just been getting piles of notes I need to write, revision I need to do and further reading I have to do for each module. I've not been getting enough time to socialise and when I do I just feel knackered. Also in order for yourself to get a good resume when you graduate, you're supposed to do side projects as well. I'll be having two tests soon and I have been revising, but nothing is going in.

The reason why I'm considering to drop out is the content of the modules. After hours of revising, I just haven't gotten anything in at all. Since I started this course I've been worrying if I'm going to pass my 1st year. Before I felt fine about my progress, but I know nothing (like Jon Snow). Now I'm worried as nothing is going in... Then I thought, why I am forcing myself and feeling stress to study the other modules that I'm gonna forget after the exam next year? Like my GCSE exams, but I'm going into debt and throwing money away in this case. Do I even need it to get a job? Self-taught programmers don't learn the content from these modules and still get a job. I honestly think now, that I'm wasting money, energy and my time over this course. I used to be optimistic and motivated, but now I just feel lost. questioning myself if uni is worth it.

If I do drop-out, I'll definitely save money and time but I'll have to pay back the loan and debt. I did plan to go the self-taught route or do a programming course even if I failed or drop-out.
I don't know if it's just me, I just don't think that this is worth it. I could literally just get a part-time job to pay off the debt and self-teach myself in my free time instead. Learn languages, complete 4 or so projects, put them in a resume and apply for a software development job. And develop my career from there. What are your thoughts?
Hi there I'm currently studying btec level 3 extended diploma and in my last year for me personally I wouldn't drop out of uni I think you should stay and Continue as its only been 5 weeks it's too early for somebody to drop out at this stage you should give your self some more time continue revising for your exams and see how well you do this is what I will do if I was in your position but you should choose what's best for you because at the end of the day It is your future.

Also would you mind sending your assignments for you second year if you still have it of course I would really appreciate it
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QuackingDuck1
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(Original post by Subhaan*786)
Hi there I'm currently studying btec level 3 extended diploma and in my last year for me personally I wouldn't drop out of uni I think you should stay and Continue as its only been 5 weeks it's too early for somebody to drop out at this stage you should give your self some more time continue revising for your exams and see how well you do this is what I will do if I was in your position but you should choose what's best for you because at the end of the day It is your future.

Also would you mind sending your assignments for you second year if you still have it of course I would really appreciate it
What year is your syllabus/specification? I did 2016 one where I didn't do any exams. I'm not sure if you're gonna do the units as I did. Yeah, I agree with you. Tbh I was going to carry on see how well I do for the tests, but these tests will be an indication of how well I'll do for the rest of the year. The marks I get will be permanent, no retakes and will be added to my overall score for the 1st year. I hope I do well
Last edited by QuackingDuck1; 1 week ago
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Lancaster Student Ambassador
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(Original post by QuackingDuck1)
If you've been following me, it would be surprising. If you don't that's fine. I studied BTEC L3 Extended Diploma in Applied Science and I got D*D*D. I got into Lancaster University and I am studying Computer Science. It has only been 5 weeks that I have been at the uni. Now I am thinking about dropping out?!

Let me explain why... I am a beginner in the field with little prior experience in Python., but that's all. I chose this course as they accept complete beginners with no foundation year and this is a great uni to study.
I thought that you'll need a degree to get in this field and the course would be great for beginners as they'll teach you from scratch. From it, you'll graduate and get a job. But from my research, this isn't true. There are self-taught programmers who can get a job.

Learning to program is fine but there are other modules in the course. For me, I have just been getting piles of notes I need to write, revision I need to do and further reading I have to do for each module. I've not been getting enough time to socialise and when I do I just feel knackered. Also in order for yourself to get a good resume when you graduate, you're supposed to do side projects as well. Because of my current situation, I don't think that I'm qualified to apply for a software engineering internship for summer next year. I'll be having two tests soon and I have been revising, but nothing is going in.

The reason why I'm considering to drop out is the content of the modules. After hours of revising, I just haven't gotten anything in at all. Since I started this course I've been worrying if I'm going to pass my 1st year. Before I felt fine about my progress, but I know nothing (like Jon Snow). Now I'm worried as nothing is going in... Then I thought, why I am forcing myself and feeling stress to study the other modules that I'm gonna forget after the exam next year? Like my GCSE exams, but I'm going into debt and throwing money away in this case. Do I even need it to get a job? Self-taught programmers don't learn the content from these modules and still get a job. I honestly think now, that I'm wasting money, energy and my time over this course. I used to be optimistic and motivated, but now I just feel lost. questioning myself if uni is worth it.

If I do drop-out, I'll definitely save money and time but I'll have to pay back the loan and debt. I did plan to go the self-taught route or do a programming course even if I failed or drop-out.
I don't know if it's just me, I just don't think that this is worth it. I could literally just get a part-time job to pay off the debt and self-teach myself in my free time instead. Learn languages, complete 4 or so projects, put them in a resume and apply for a software development job. And develop my career from there. What are your thoughts?
Hello,
I'm really sorry to hear you're having some problems.
You're only in first year, so it's okay not to be getting top marks - I really don't think you need to stress out about extra reading at this stage. What are your exams like at the end of first year? Look at past papers and only focus on content that is examinable.
I understand that maybe this course isn't for you and like you've said, there's lots of different options.
Have you spoken to a tutor/academic in the department or someone from your college?
Maybe speak to someone from careers?
They can give you some advice on what to do.
Hope you're doing okay and let me know if I can help you in anyway.
Charlotte
3rd year Biological Sciences with Biomedicine
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winterscoming
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You've mentioned self-teaching as an option, which is definitely something which can work (it worked for me - I started teaching myself at home during secondary school years), although the level of motivation you need for self-teaching is definitely higher than being at than university; you don't have any contact time with lecturers, and you need to find a way of structuring that learning yourself.

By self-teaching you'll rely a lot more heavily on Google, StackOverflow, internet discussion forums, your own research, trial-and-error, etc. (Athough realistically speaking, you should be relying on those pretty heavily at uni anyway - the modules are usually designed around you having a lot of self-study time - especially from the time spent on assignments and coursework).

You've already signed up to the tuition fees for your first year, meaning it's already too late to get that back unfortunately - you may as well get the most out of the money you've paid, try to see yourself through to the end of the year and take a decision afterwards on what to do next. At the very least, you should be able to earn a Level 4 CertHE qualification just by completing the first year.

You mentioned summer internships, but these are relatively uncommon - the majority of CompSci students don't get any industrial experience until after the 2nd year when many degrees include an option to pick up a 12-month placement instead. The main reason summer internships aren't very common is that 3 months isn't enough time for most typical undergrads to learn enough about the job and be productive - which also means that the "bar" for a summer internship is higher/more competitive. I'm not sure whether a sandwich year is an option at your university, but if it is then I'd focus on that instead (even if it isn't supported by the university, you could take a gap year after year 2 and find one by yourself).

I only had had a quick look at the first year content for Lancaster, but from the descriptions of each of the 4 core modules, it seems that there to me that more than half of the content would be the kinds of things that you'd end up needing to teach yourself anyway if you decided to follow your own path. Even if you're finding it hard to follow the material at the same pace as the course, remember you still have all the support available from the lecturers to be able to ask questions, and that you're only really a few weeks in with loads of time left to revisit the material to try to catch up.

Although, perhaps if you're finding that taking notes isn't working for you, then it could be worth trying a different approach instead. Many topics inComputer Science don't really benefit from attempting to memorise things. For example, topics related to logic, programming, algorithms, databases, etc all rely on you being able to understand the underlying concepts, learn new ways of thinking, and learn new problem solving techniques so that you can apply those skills to real problems and use the concepts/technologies to create a solution. Straightforward memorisation of material from notes and textbooks is great for some topics (e.g. Legal/ethical issues), but is mostly a waste of time on topics like logic, algorithms, software design, etc, since it doesn't translate into being able to analyse or solve problems and the only way to really learn those is to practice with them. So depending on the topic, it might be that some of your time currently spent writing notes could be better spent by applying yourself with some hands-on problem solving instead (and hopefully more interesting as well).


Otherwise, I completely agree with your uni rep above, talk to the staff there and try to get some help from them before making a decision to drop out.
Last edited by winterscoming; 1 week ago
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QuackingDuck1
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Thank you for your replies. I guess that I was just stressed as this is a new subject for me. I am going to continue the course and see how it goes. I wasn't fully wanting to drop out, I wanted to share my thoughts online first. In order to see the possible paths, I can take if I do, if the content will be helpful and if it was just me at that time. Hopefully, I will pass the first year and I'll see what will happen then. Thanks, everyone
Last edited by QuackingDuck1; 1 week ago
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