Anonymous #1
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i do want to go on to either become a solicitor or barrister probably a solicitor as barrister is a lot harder to get into, i know you can become one without having a law degree by doing the one year practical thing after your degree, so is a law degree worth it, i.e is it preferred, does it help you with a law career, also if you can do a different degree then do the one year thing then why is law even an option especially considering its three years and people can do another degree and then do the course thing in a year to train to become a solicitor??
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username4218074
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(Original post by Anonymous)
i do want to go on to either become a solicitor or barrister probably a solicitor as barrister is a lot harder to get into, i know you can become one without having a law degree by doing the one year practical thing after your degree, so is a law degree worth it, i.e is it preferred, does it help you with a law career, also if you can do a different degree then do the one year thing then why is law even an option especially considering its three years and people can do another degree and then do the course thing in a year to train to become a solicitor??
The university degree, 'law' isn't a vocational subject at many top universities and is as valid a course as PPE or History - the law is a topic and thus can be studied out of interest and practicality. The skills picked up by learning the course such as verbal reasoning and analytical skills are useful in many careers. Finally, it goes without saying that studying law (jurisprudence) or law LLB will give you a much greater, in depth knowledge of the law and thus make it easier to complete the PLC (or whatever its called) as well as provide a strong foundation for a career in law. If you're interested in studying law in-depth along side its philosophical components then study law at uni, if you're interested more in a subject like biology but want to be a solicitor then use the alternate route.
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Reality Check
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(Original post by Anonymous)
also if you can do a different degree then do the one year thing then why is law even an option especially considering its three years and people can do another degree and then do the course thing in a year to train to become a solicitor??
Umm, because there's more to it than just being some sort of vocational training! People do law at uni because they're interested in it as an academic endeavour, rather than because it might lead to a career in the law. Amazingly, some people study law without any intention of ever practising as a lawyer.

Weird, huh?
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username4218074
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(Original post by Reality Check)
Umm, because there's more to it than just being some sort of vocational training! People do law at uni because they're interested in it as an academic endeavour, rather than because it might lead to a career in the law. Amazingly, some people study law without any intention of ever practising as a lawyer.

Weird, huh?
Agreed, that's something I might look to do as well.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Levi.-)
Agreed, that's something I might look to do as well.
(Original post by Reality Check)
Umm, because there's more to it than just being some sort of vocational training! People do law at uni because they're interested in it as an academic endeavour, rather than because it might lead to a career in the law. Amazingly, some people study law without any intention of ever practising as a lawyer.

Weird, huh?
what do you mean by vocational training? also i still don’t understand why anyone would do a degree if they have no intention of going into that field
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Sam Burdis
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If you want to be a lawyer then a law degree is worth it.

Not really sure what else to say, it comes down to whether that's really what you're interested in.
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harrysbar
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(Original post by Anonymous)
i do want to go on to either become a solicitor or barrister probably a solicitor as barrister is a lot harder to get into, i know you can become one without having a law degree by doing the one year practical thing after your degree, so is a law degree worth it, i.e is it preferred, does it help you with a law career, also if you can do a different degree then do the one year thing then why is law even an option especially considering its three years and people can do another degree and then do the course thing in a year to train to become a solicitor??
No but yeah but it takes a year longer to train to be a solicitor if you have to do a practical thing for an extra year after your degree
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Reality Check
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And why is this anonymous!
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Reality Check)
And why is this anonymous!
funny init
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returnmigrant
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Law, like other subjects such as Politics, English, History, do not necessarily lead to a job directly linked to that degree.
Many graduates with degrees in all sorts of subjects end up working in totally different areas to their degree.

Why - because doing a degree is an academic training. It teaches you how to think, reason, consider, write, research and above all else it teaches you 'higher thinking skills'. This is why many employers are not fussed what subject you did at Uni, just that you have a degree.

Law grads dont just become lawyers. Name a professional job and you'll find Law grads in it.
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Crazy Jamie
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(Original post by Anonymous)
what do you mean by vocational training? also i still don’t understand why anyone would do a degree if they have no intention of going into that field
Vocational training concentrates on the practical skills required to do a particular job or role. A law degree is academic. You learn about the law, but it will not teach you rules of procedure or practically how to represent a client. It is the vocational training that does that. The BPTC, for example, teaches subjects such as criminal and civil litigation (i.e. procedure rather than law), advocacy, opinion writing and drafting. All practical skills (or, in the case of procedure, practical knowledge) that are required to actually practise as a barrister.

Your confusion might come from thinking that the additional year after a non law degree is a "practical thing". It isn't. The GDL is a one year postgraduate course that provides you with a qualifying law degree. But it is academic, teaching the same core modules as a law degree. It is not practical, and is not a substitute for the postgraduate training for either a solicitor or a barrister. It is a precursor to that training in the same way that a law degree is.

In terms of going with a law degree or not, it does not matter in and of itself for the purposes of securing a training contract or pupillage. If you have an interest in another subject, you can and arguably should pursue that first all things people equal (and if, for example, the additional cost doesn't concern you). Personally I did a law degree and regretted it simply because with the benefit of hindsight there were other subjects that I could and should have pursued first. I'm a barrister now and very much enjoy my job, but I still don't think much of law as an academic subject. You may, of course, disagree, and if you do find it interesting then by all means go for a law degree. Both of the routes can end up in the same place, it's just a matter of choosing the route that is right for you. Grades are important irrespective though. If you feel that you may get better grades doing one route rather than the other (for example, you'll probably get a 2:1 in one but may get a First in the other), that should be an important factor in making your decision.
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