paying tax whilst being a student of any age? Watch

~darliahhhh~
Badges: 0
#1
Report Thread starter 10 years ago
#1
Hi guys,

I just wanted to know if I was to get a job anytime after 16 would have to pay tax with the wage I come out with.
So lets say it is £300 I get from a job but only come out with less due to 17.5% tax deducted from it.

Also when I start Uni in 2010 and get a job then will I be classed as a student therefore as long as I provide evidence I'm a student do I not have to pay tax if I get a job whilst at uni.

This question is probably easy for some if you are at uni or 6 form or college that have jobs and know whether or not they pay tax and it may mean I sound rather dumb but I just wanted like an official answer!!!

So basically if you're like 22 in uni and want a job whilst being a student at uni do you have to pay tax if you can prove your a student?[same with 6 form and college]

Thanks.
0
reply
Orthala
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#2
Report 10 years ago
#2
Students aren't exempt from tax.

If you earn over the equivilent of £5435 a year, you pay income tax. If you earn over £105 a week then you have to pay National Insurance (another type of tax).

Also where did you get 17.5% from? Thats VAT, nothing to do with earning money...
0
reply
~darliahhhh~
Badges: 0
#3
Report Thread starter 10 years ago
#3
Oh yeah except of National Insurance, I mean the normal money that is taken from you-how much is that normally?
0
reply
TheOneWho
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#4
Report 10 years ago
#4
Students do pay tax. If you go over your personal allowance (what that is will be your tax code with a zero on the end) then you will start to pay tax on whatever you earn, student or not. Students, unless they work a lot, won't earn more than their allowance.
0
reply
Orthala
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#5
Report 10 years ago
#5
(Original post by ~darliahhhh~)
Oh yeah except of National Insurance, I mean the normal money that is taken from you-how much is that normally?
if you earn above £105 a week (the 'earnings threshold') and up to £770 per week you pay 11 per cent of this amount as 'Class 1' NICs
0
reply
*River
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#6
Report 10 years ago
#6
As said, being a student does NOT exempt you from tax, if you earn less than the personal allowance then you won't have to, but otherwise you will. One you get your P60 at the end of the tax year, you can find out whether or not you can claim back any tax that's been deducted from your wages.

If a household is entirely made up of students, you don't have to pay council tax (which may be where the confusion over income tax arises from).
0
reply
~darliahhhh~
Badges: 0
#7
Report Thread starter 10 years ago
#7
Thanks guys

I think I will hit my cousen for telling me students are exempt from tax
0
reply
20083
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#8
Report 10 years ago
#8
(Original post by ~darliahhhh~)
Oh yeah except of National Insurance, I mean the normal money that is taken from you-how much is that normally?
Depends on your tax code, and how much you earn over the year. Chances are you will not earn enough to have to pay tax, if you do, it probably won't be much over. I currently pay about £200 income tax over the year.

Students are exempt from council tax though.
0
reply
andy_cole2
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#9
Report 10 years ago
#9
most students are exempt simply because they don't fit the criteria to pay, also what happens if you earn over 770 a week???
0
reply
Jamin
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#10
Report 10 years ago
#10
If for a couple of months though you do earn enough to be taxed, you an always claim it back at the end of the year.
0
reply
Orthala
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#11
Report 10 years ago
#11
(Original post by andy_cole2)
most students are exempt simply because they don't fit the criteria to pay, also what happens if you earn over 770 a week???
# you also pay one per cent of earnings above £770 a week as Class 1 NICs

http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/MoneyTax...Tax/DG_4015904

All on there
0
reply
LadyJaneGrey
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#12
Report 10 years ago
#12
(Original post by *River)
As said, being a student does NOT exempt you from tax, if you earn less than the personal allowance then you won't have to, but otherwise you will. One you get your P60 at the end of the tax year, you can find out whether or not you can claim back any tax that's been deducted from your wages.

If a household is entirely made up of students, you don't have to pay council tax (which may be where the confusion over income tax arises from).
If (say) a household is made up of 4 students and one non-student (for some wierd reason) and all the 4 students lived at home when they weren't at uni...any idea what the tax situation there would be? And what about if you were a student living at home? Does each and every house (unless made up solely of students or other tax exempt people) have to pay a set amount of council tax or does it vary according to number of people living in the house?

Not that the answer particularly affects me in any way, just curious.
0
reply
20083
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#13
Report 10 years ago
#13
(Original post by andy_cole2)
most students are exempt simply because they don't fit the criteria to pay, also what happens if you earn over 770 a week???
It's not based per week, it's based per year. If you earn £770 per week for 2 weeks, then you still have not earned enough.

If you have a summer job, you can ask your employer for a form that says you are a full time student, working during holidays and probably will not make enough over the year.
0
reply
20083
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#14
Report 10 years ago
#14
(Original post by LadyJaneGrey)
If (say) a household is made up of 4 students and one non-student (for some wierd reason) and all the 4 students lived at home when they weren't at uni...any idea what the tax situation there would be? And what about if you were a student living at home? Does each and every house (unless made up solely of students or other tax exempt people) have to pay a set amount of council tax or does it vary according to number of people living in the house?

Not that the answer particularly affects me in any way, just curious.
Students don't pay council tax, that's all you really need to worry about. The others in the house will have to pay, as they are not students.
0
reply
*River
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#15
Report 10 years ago
#15
(Original post by LadyJaneGrey)
If (say) a household is made up of 4 students and one non-student (for some wierd reason) and all the 4 students lived at home when they weren't at uni...any idea what the tax situation there would be? And what about if you were a student living at home? Does each and every house (unless made up solely of students or other tax exempt people) have to pay a set amount of council tax or does it vary according to number of people living in the house?

Not that the answer particularly affects me in any way, just curious.
The non-student(s) are legally obligated to pay council tax; whether or not this comes at a reduced rate because the majority of the occupants are students, I don't know.

I think council tax is set by which band your house falls into (decided by things such as the number of bedrooms if I remember correctly).
0
reply
Orthala
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#16
Report 10 years ago
#16
(Original post by SillyFencer)
It's not based per week, it's based per year. If you earn £770 per week for 2 weeks, then you still have not earned enough.

If you have a summer job, you can ask your employer for a form that says you are a full time student, working during holidays and probably will not make enough over the year.
Thats wrong. National Insurance is based on WEEKLY earnings. Income tax is based on yearly earnings. Please keep up with the convo
0
reply
LadyJaneGrey
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#17
Report 10 years ago
#17
(Original post by *River)
The non-student(s) are legally obligated to pay council tax; whether or not this comes at a reduced rate because the majority of the occupants are students, I don't know.

I think council tax is set by which band your house falls into (decided by things such as the number of bedrooms if I remember correctly).
Thanks!
0
reply
20083
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#18
Report 10 years ago
#18
(Original post by Orthala)
Thats wrong. National Insurance is based on WEEKLY earnings. Income tax is based on yearly earnings. Please keep up with the convo
The conversation is tax. NI is something different.
0
reply
Orthala
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#19
Report 10 years ago
#19
(Original post by SillyFencer)
The conversation is tax. NI is something different.
Please read the whole of the thread. Someone asked about NI. I replied to these, hence the starting conversation about NI.

And NI is a form of tax. Therefore it is not something different.
0
reply
20083
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#20
Report 10 years ago
#20
(Original post by Orthala)
Please read the whole of the thread. Someone asked about NI. I replied to these, hence the starting conversation about NI.

And NI is a form of tax. Therefore it is not something different.
The topic is tax, anything else is off-topic!

NI is not tax. It's what it says, a national insurance.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Have you registered to vote?

Yes! (551)
37.82%
No - but I will (114)
7.82%
No - I don't want to (102)
7%
No - I can't vote (<18, not in UK, etc) (690)
47.36%

Watched Threads

View All