How much do you spend? Watch

Audrey Hepburn
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Disregarding accommodation and tuition fees, how much would you say that you spent during an average term at Oxford?

I only ask because I haven't got much money saved up and I'm starting to worry about how much I can mooch from my parents...

Also, how much does one spend on a night out in Oxford (on average)?
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Quistis
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In my first year I spent about £50 a week, but that was including a couple of meals out a week. In my second year, £35-40. Though I tended to go to the college bar/drink wine in friends' rooms, rather than go out to clubs, so my spending is on the low side. My spending was a lot higher in third year because I went to three balls, went on a few daytrips to London, and went out a bit more.

I hardly ever went to clubs, so can't help there, but if you go to happy hour in a cheap cocktail bar, you're only looking at £2-4 a drink, so you can get fairly merry for little over a tenner. Pubs, well, some are expensive, but an evening in a cheaper one doesn't have to be more than £10 for a few drinks. (Avoid the Turf - charged me about £6 for a double and mixer last term!)
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(-1)^(1/2)
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<£75>. Insofar that you are willing to eat the garbage they serve in hall, you can presumably get by by a lot less.
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Greatleysteg
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(Original post by Audrey Hepburn)
Disregarding accommodation and tuition fees, how much would you say that you spent during an average term at Oxford?

I only ask because I haven't got much money saved up and I'm starting to worry about how much I can mooch from my parents...

Also, how much does one spend on a night out in Oxford (on average)?
I've nothing saved And I need to buy a bike/my reading list/new clothes.
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Darty
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It's normally about proportional to how much you like to go out. I just finished my first year. In Michaelmas, I spent around £140 a week. In Hilary about £80 a week. In Trinity I had to ration myself down to £40 a week. Main difference was going out. In Michaelmas I went out 3/4 times a week at £25 a pop. (£5/£10 for pre-drinking, £5 for club entry, £8/£13 on drinks in clubs, £2 on cheesy chips afterwards). Hilary I only went out 1/2 a week. Then Trinity with exams and stuff it was much more rare. It's perfectly easy to get by on £40 a week, but you normally need to make compromises on your social life if you want to do that.
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hobnob
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(Original post by Greatleysteg)
I've nothing saved And I need to buy a bike/my reading list/new clothes.
Don't spend too much on books. Get a few essential texts which you know you'll be using a lot, plus a couple of primary texts you actually want to own, but once you're at Oxford, you'll be using libraries most of the time anyway. The library facilities are very good, so you'd be crazy not to take advantage of that.
If you do end up buying a couple of (non-primary) texts, though, make sure you keep the receipts. Hilda's often gives book grants to first-years (around £50, but you can't use it to buy primary texts). I'm not sure whether they'll have book grants next year, but if you're buying those books anyway, there'll be no harm in keeping the receipts just in case.
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Greatleysteg
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(Original post by hobnob)
Don't spend too much on books. Get a few essential texts which you know you'll be using a lot, plus a couple of primary texts you actually want to own, but once you're at Oxford, you'll be using libraries most of the time anyway. The library facilities are very good, so you'd be crazy not to take advantage of that.
If you do end up buying a couple of (non-primary) texts, though, make sure you keep the receipts. Hilda's often gives book grants to first-years (around £50, but you can't use it to buy primary texts). I'm not sure whether they'll have book grants next year, but if you're buying those books anyway, there'll be no harm in keeping the receipts just in case.
Yes, I'd read about the grants, but I got a sweet/dour letter along with reading list, telling me how I'd have to read the entire contents of the list before I got there, or I'd find it immensely difficult to catch up.

It's not going hugely well - I don't own, nor have I ever owned, an English-French or English-German dictionary. It's painful using leo.dict, and there's not even an equivalent for French.
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hobnob
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(Original post by Greatleysteg)
Yes, I'd read about the grants, but I got a sweet/dour letter along with reading list, telling me how I'd have to read the entire contents of the list before I got there, or I'd find it immensely difficult to catch up.
I'd take that with a pinch of salt. Obviously you should try to get through most of it because you'll have to read those books at some point anyway, but realistically, most people don't manage to get through the entire list. Even in a worst case scenario you'll still be able to do some catching up on some of the later topics at the beginning of term (unfortunately that could mean you may not be able to get quite as drunk during fresher's week as you might have been planning to).
It's not going hugely well - I don't own, nor have I ever owned, an English-French or English-German dictionary. It's painful using leo.dict, and there's not even an equivalent for French.
Well, that's a different matter, of course. I thought you were planning to buy half the books on your reading list... Getting decent dictionaries is probably a good idea in the long run, because it'll save you having to trot down to the library / mess around with online dictionaries every time you need to look up a word.
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Greatleysteg
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(Original post by hobnob)
I'd take that with a pinch of salt. Obviously you should try to get through most of it because you'll have to read those books at some point anyway, but realistically, most people don't manage to get through the entire list. Even in a worst case scenario you'll still be able to do some catching up on some of the later topics at the beginning of term (unfortunately that could mean you may not be able to get quite as drunk during fresher's week as you might have been planning to).

Well, that's a different matter, of course. I thought you were planning to buy half the books on your reading list... Getting decent dictionaries is probably a good idea in the long run, because it'll save you having to trot down to the library / mess around with online dictionaries every time you need to look up a word.
Thanks for the advice I think it's about time I got dictionaries and stopped winging it on linguistic intuition. Especially as the literature is a bit of a shock (not the literature itself, the fact that I've 19 things to read in another language).

I did want to buy the books on my list, because I'm funny like that - I'd want to own the books. Plus, I'll have to buy half of them at some point, having only been able to get some of them at the central library. I coudn't find Mario und der Sauberer, Lettres d'une Peruvienne, and many others anywhere! I'll have to get them online somehow and hope my mum will pay for them up front, which I doubt.
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hobnob
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(Original post by Greatleysteg)
I did want to buy the books on my list, because I'm funny like that - I'd want to own the books. Plus, I'll have to buy half of them at some point, having only been able to get some of them at the central library. I coudn't find Mario und der Sauberer, Lettres d'une Peruvienne, and many others anywhere! I'll have to get them online somehow and hope my mum will pay for them up front, which I doubt.
If you don't mind second-hand books, try here:
http://www.abebooks.de/servlet/Searc...uberer&x=0&y=0
http://www.abebooks.fr/servlet/Searc...vienne&x=0&y=0
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Greatleysteg
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(Original post by hobnob)
If you don't mind second-hand books, try here:
http://www.abebooks.de/servlet/Searc...uberer&x=0&y=0
http://www.abebooks.fr/servlet/Searc...vienne&x=0&y=0
Wow, they're insanely cheap. Thanks a lot!
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Athena
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I swing wildly (as little as £20, as much as £120, generally around £55) in what I spend, dependent on things like living in college and eating hall food (paid for in advance) - ie. no need to pay for taxis/buses, more eating in college and battling it, rather than hitting Tesco, no utilities bills. I've also had to go home practically every other week over the last two terms for physio (long story) so I had to pay for train fares, and that added about £50 per term to my spending. I get money from my parents and grandparents, and vac job wages.
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Darty
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(Original post by **MidnightMia**)
How did you manage that on a student loan? -> savings from a summer job?
The joys of a £1250 overdraft.
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martin101
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sixty quid a week just about covers me...
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Quistis
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(Original post by **MidnightMia**)
Ooooooh.... *realisation dawns*

I thought people didnt go into their overdrafts except in emergencies, is this not the case because its all too expensive?


Do people tend to get a set allowance from relatives to live on each term, as all of the loan is already gone on college rent etc.?


EDIT to first question: *or am I just being naive, as need and want can be very different? :p:
In my first two years, I got minimum loan, which was about £3100. My college battels were about £2800 a year, which wouldn't leave much loan to live on, so my parents gave me £400 a term allowance. I only worked in one summer vacation, but the extra £1000 that brought in was mostly used to pay for the extra expense of living out - my rent was about £4500 for that year. I did odd days' work in other vacations, earning £50 here and there, but that was mostly used to afford treats like ball tickets.

In my final year, my dad had just retired, so I was eligible for about an extra £1000 in loans. The plan was to save that extra £1000, but I spent about £600 of it - well, it was my last year at Oxford, so I went out more, went to three balls (admittedly, one was a free ticket and I already had a dress, but I had to pay for shoes/bag/shrug/jewellery/meal in Quod beforehand, so it still wasn't cheap!), went to London a few times, etc etc. I'll probably spend the rest of that extra money on driving lessons this summer.

I didn't even have an overdraft facility in first year - didn't apply for one because I didn't need one and didn't want the temptation. In second year I got a bank account with a £250 overdraft limit, and that suits me fine - I've only gone properly overdrawn once, and that was because I had a month of really heavy outgoings, but it was fine because it was the end of term, so when my allowance came in a couple of weeks later I was sorted. But I'm lucky - if ever my student loan was late coming in, my parents would just pay my battels and I'd pay them back when I had the money. A lot of people can't bank on that level of help, and so having a big overdraft facility allows them to pay their battels/rent even if their student loan is late.

And a lot of my friends go overdrawn over the course of the year, then have to work all summer to earn the £1000 to break even again. I'm glad I never fell into that cycle.
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caustic87
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(Original post by **MidnightMia**)
Ooooooh.... *realisation dawns*

I thought people didnt go into their overdrafts except in emergencies, is this not the case because its all too expensive?


Do people tend to get a set allowance from relatives to live on each term, as all of the loan is already gone on college rent etc.?


EDIT to first question: *or am I just being naive, as need and want can be very different? :p:
Initally, I was all "I'll never use my overdraft", but I ended up having too - things like the deposit for my house and when I got the end of the year and money earnt during the holidays was running out. I'll have it all paid off by September though, and some to spare. I try not to use it, but I can't help it. Plus, it's interest free, so if I can pay off £200 reasonably easily by working (really, only one weeks full time work in the holidays), I'd rather have some fun with my friends.

As for the OP's initial question, I try to limit myself to £100 per week, maximum. It usually works. I have spent as little as £40, but I was being really careful and didn't go out much. Most goes on going on, seeing plays, movies, occasional clothes buying and meals out. My parents give me an allowance of about £600 per term, but most of my money comes from summer jobs. Oh, and I have my scholarship.

OP - it really isn't too late to get a summer job if you're worried about cash. Join a temping agency; lots of places look for 3 month contracts. I worked the summer before I came and I could cover all my new books and had plenty of money for first term... not the case now, sadly!
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Greatleysteg
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Ouch, I'm only going to be getting £200 a term from my mum..
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zodiac90
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There are some colleges which force you (by making you buy their dinner tickets) to eat their food i heard - can anyone tell me which ones these are?
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Quistis
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St. Hilda's force you to buy £120 of meal credit a term, and at the end of the academic year, any meal credit you haven't spent is just taken by the college, NOT refunded. But you can spend the £120 however you wish - Hall sells wine and snacks as well as the usual three meals a day, so if you only ever eat breakfast in there, like I did, it's easy enough to use up the £120 by stocking up on plonk and chocolate.
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flippanetic
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(Original post by Greatleysteg)
It's not going hugely well - I don't own, nor have I ever owned, an English-French or English-German dictionary. It's painful using leo.dict, and there's not even an equivalent for French.
I'm sure you will need paper dictionaries as well, but wordreference.com is really good for French, and has a German online dictionary as well now.
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