Is English lit and lang (A-level and GCSE) useful for the future?? Watch

Poll: Is English lit and lang (A-level and GCSE) useful for the future??
Yes (5)
62.5%
No (2)
25%
Depends (1)
12.5%
1st superstar
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question above also i will tell you my answer it's: na to na to the NO, NO,NO
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National Extension College
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English Literature and Language give you the skills of critical thinking, essay writing and language that will help you hone your writing. This is useful in most fields, such as marketing, academia, law, politics, and many more. Particularly English Language GCSE is a subject, along with maths, that you will be asked about throughout your life when applying to any jobs, entry level or beyond.

Best wishes,
Charlotte
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(Original post by National Extension College)
English Literature and Language give you the skills of critical thinking, essay writing and language that will help you hone your writing. This is useful in most fields, such as marketing, academia, law, politics, and many more. Particularly English Language GCSE is a subject, along with maths, that you will be asked about throughout your life when applying to any jobs, entry level or beyond.

Best wishes,
Charlotte
Disagree... and can tell you why!!!
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aciana
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(Original post by 1st superstar)
Disagree... and can tell you why!!!
Please do. Emma by Jane Austen is an excellent introduction into critical thinking and a warning of how we are easily influenced by charismatic or authoritarian voices and, somewhat due to laziness or naivety, don't think for ourselves. I would think that's an important book to read to get people to question information being handed to them.
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bribriaa
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I think GCSE english lit and lang can be useful to an extent and, well, required by everything, however, I can't see how useful it would be as an A-Level unless you're aiming to do anything based on writing essays.

So, it really depends.
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(Original post by aciana)
Please do. Emma by Jane Austen is an excellent introduction into critical thinking and a warning of how we are easily influenced by charismatic or authoritarian voices and, somewhat due to laziness or naivety, don't think for ourselves. I would think that's an important book to read to get people to question information being handed to them.
English on historical fictional books is by far the least needed subject if you want to do anything outside an English or Philosophical or law career (plus you can now do Law for A-level). At least philosophy makes sense (and I support philosophy as it can be optional at some schools for GCSEs) I have not would have problem with English lit if you were given the option to opt out of it during GCSEs and if it wasn't a "facilitating subject" those 4 hrs per fortnight are a waste a could be used to do other things (even if it just means analysing more modern books) or even better...learning life skills!! :woohoo: .Even 100 years ago people were taught life skills in school (women were taught how to cook, men were taught how to exercise, prepare for the workforce skills they all of them needed to know for their generation) the skills we learn now in school do not correlate to the skills we need now for the 21st century "real world" of work unless you are willing to do something academic (but not everyone is willing to go down that route...). If you enjoy English lit great do it but the government shouldn't be shoving down subjects in people's throats that are 80% of the time not going to help you for the future... instead have compulsory grammar tests like in other countries
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,

(Original post by aciana)
Please do. Emma by Jane Austen is an excellent introduction into critical thinking and a warning of how we are easily influenced by charismatic or authoritarian voices and, somewhat due to laziness or naivety, don't think for ourselves. I would think that's an important book to read to get people to question information being handed to them.
Could probably give more reasons but I can't be bothered right now...
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