is politics only for the upper classes Watch

jazzyjelly
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#1
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To be a politician, must you be privately educated?
and do those who take degrees in politics end up being politicians, what other careers are available to them?
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Speedbird2008
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Yes, quite right to.

(Just look at Mr Prescott...)
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Tinkerbee
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You dont have to be upper class to have been privately educated...
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Denny Crane
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You need the right connections to get into politics.
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Gemma_08
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Usually you need to have a good education to get into politics.
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rkd
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Fairly few politicians have politics degrees - more are lawyers or historians.
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kftjkp
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Not having a private education does not preclude you becoming a politician and nor should it.
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LearningMath
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Getting into politics means having a good education, private schools generaly offer better educations, hence people who have been privatly schooled may stand a better chance. Obviously there are loads of exceptions, but reasonable logic i think.
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Cognito
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Sure there is a correllation between political careers and strong educational backgrounds but there is no sense necessitation. Alan Johnson was a postman before becoming a politician (and cabinet minister), John Major never went to university etc.
As for all politicians being 'upper class', this is frankly ridiculous. 'Upper class' is usually used to refer to those with titles, estates and/or connections to royalty. (this may not be an entirely water tight definition but it is close enough). Outside of the Lords, there are few politicians who are in such a position. I would say that almost all politicians were middle class if such a distinction had to be made.
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Norfolkadam
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David Davis is a good example of a politician that isn't an idiot but isn't "upper class".
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Demoskratos7
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If David Cameron had his way, then yes.

However, for those of us that believe in democracy rather than oligarchy, then nope, politics is inherently inclusive. It should involve people from all backgrounds, colours and classes, because everybody should have the right to exert the same influence in the society of which they are a part. There remains, however, a strong and small elite group dominant within politics in the UK, and I'm afraid the Oxbridge system, and especially the private school tradition, doesn't help this.
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Demoskratos7
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(Original post by Norfolkadam)
David Davis is a good example of a politician that isn't an idiot but isn't "upper class".
David Davis is a complete idiot. And a hypocrite.
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username196545
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Well, I'm doing Political Science at uni and I'm certainly not upper class
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Ed.
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I would imagine very few politicians have politics degrees. And you don't have to be privately educated- but it helps.
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Speedbird2008
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(Original post by Norfolkadam)
David Davis is a good example of a politician that isn't an idiot but isn't "upper class".
Yes he is.

Oh, and he is, effectively, upper class. He just doesn't have the correct background to warrant him being err... "fully" upper class.
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Afton Lawson
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(Original post by Demoskratos7)
If David Cameron had his way, then yes.

However, for those of us that believe in democracy rather than oligarchy, then nope, politics is inherently inclusive. It should involve people from all backgrounds, colours and classes, because everybody should have the right to exert the same influence in the society of which they are a part. There remains, however, a strong and small elite group dominant within politics in the UK, and I'm afraid the Oxbridge system, and especially the private school tradition, doesn't help this.
Don't diss David , my dad knows him from his days at Eton, he was in the year below.

And tbf have you read the conservative party values recently ?
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Demoskratos7
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(Original post by Ed.)
I would imagine very few politicians have politics degrees. And you don't have to be privately educated- but it helps.
I'd go far as to say that I wouldn't vote for a politician if they had a politics degree.
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faber niger
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Of course not. Working-class people have been prominent in politics since the beginning of the 20th century.
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faber niger
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(Original post by Demoskratos7)
I'd go far as to say that I wouldn't vote for a politician if they had a politics degree.
That sounds a little silly. And why so?
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Cognito
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(Original post by jismith1989)
Of course not. Working-class people have been prominent in politics since the beginning of the 20th century.
Well before that if you consider Tyler and the Peasant's revolt
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