Drew Wolf
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I'm just wondering whether there are any cardiac physiologists on this and their thoughts and opinions on the career. I've been looking around the internet and there's very little information about it as opposed to other healthcare careers. I just want to know the actual salary, is it a difficult career in terms of learning the mechanisms, and how long does it take to be promoted for a higher position? (I don't mind whether you are at uni or working as one)
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Reality Check
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(Original post by Drew Wolf)
is it a difficult career in terms of learning the mechanisms,
I'm not a cardiologist, but I can safely say 'yes' to this.

Whether it's more or less difficult than other specialisms is a different matter and, I suspect, depends on who you ask and what their specialism happens to be!
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kawaii sashimi
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(Original post by Drew Wolf)
I'm just wondering whether there are any cardiac physiologists on this and their thoughts and opinions on the career. I've been looking around the internet and there's very little information about it as opposed to other healthcare careers. I just want to know the actual salary, is it a difficult career in terms of learning the mechanisms, and how long does it take to be promoted for a higher position? (I don't mind whether you are at uni or working as one)
Hiya!
I just started doing this at uni this year, so I'm not too knowledgeable about it, but this is what I got from talking to the older years and staff when I was applying and wondering the same thing. (There really should be more about it online! )

My lecturers did practice in the field and they can safely say they that they definitely enjoyed their careers so far. Some of them still practise part of the time and the other times they're at my uni teaching us. The salary differs regionally, but from what I've been told, once you qualify, you're eligible to start at band 5 on the nhs salary. Tbh, at the time I didn't really know what band 5 meant, but, what I did was Google 'cardiac physiologist jobs' (followed by the city I'm in) and then you can get a rough idea. With career progression and promotion, I do think that it takes a long time. I did see a senior cardiac physiologist working in the hospital but he was kinda old, so I think it's safe to say, that it takes a long time, as with any career. However, there is a clear path of progression and some hospitals after you've gotten a job with them, do pay for you to take courses to help you with that progression like doing echocardiography courses etc, to allow you to be 'promoted' or move up the bands. I think in terms of getting a job and starting, it's a good idea to do a cardiac physiology degree that's accredited for example by the hcpc. There are also now some apprenticeship type courses too btw! E.g. in middlesex university.

Back in september I talked to some people who had just graduated from uni, and qualified as well, and they all had found jobs within 6 months of leaving university and were relatively happy. One person even said that you can qualify here and work in Australia too if you wanted to. With the salary, for many years, you probably won't be well off or rich, but unless you're doctor, i think that's the same for all of us in the allied health professions in the nhs.

I really have no idea if it's a difficult career I'm terms of learning mechanisms, But so far in uni, all I know is that theres a lot of science and medical-based learning through lectures and that we have to do a lot of graph reading, learning how equipment works, how to work well and be part of the nhs, clinical skills and that we are going to learn a lot of it on placement in actual hospitals for several weeks too (over the 3 years). I do also know that atm, there is demand for cardiac physiologists, so that's good.

The only website that I found to be really helpful was the prospects website:
https://www.prospects.ac.uk/case-stu...aneliese-lagan
https://www.prospects.ac.uk/job-prof...rdiac-sciences
https://www.prospects.ac.uk/careers-...ree/physiology

If you aren't applying for this ucas cycle, it would be good to shadow one in a hospital first to get a better idea or contact universities who offer the course directly with these questions and they'd be happy to answer them
Last edited by kawaii sashimi; 2 weeks ago
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Drew Wolf
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(Original post by kawaii sashimi)
Hiya!
I just started doing this at uni this year, so I'm not too knowledgeable about it, but this is what I got from talking to the older years and staff when I was applying and wondering the same thing. (There really should be more about it online! )

My lecturers did practice in the field and they can safely say they that they definitely enjoyed their careers so far. Some of them still practise part of the time and the other times they're at my uni teaching us. The salary differs regionally, but from what I've been told, once you qualify, you're eligible to start at band 5 on the nhs salary. Tbh, at the time I didn't really know what band 5 meant, but, what I did was Google 'cardiac physiologist jobs' (followed by the city I'm in) and then you can get a rough idea. With career progression and promotion, I do think that it takes a long time. I did see a senior cardiac physiologist working in the hospital but he was kinda old, so I think it's safe to say, that it takes a long time, as with any career. However, there is a clear path of progression and some hospitals after you've gotten a job with them, do pay for you to take courses to help you with that progression like doing echocardiography courses etc, to allow you to be 'promoted' or move up the bands. I think in terms of getting a job and starting, it's a good idea to do a cardiac physiology degree that's accredited for example by the hcpc. There are also now some apprenticeship type courses too btw! E.g. in middlesex university.

Back in september I talked to some people who had just graduated from uni, and qualified as well, and they all had found jobs within 6 months of leaving university and were relatively happy. One person even said that you can qualify here and work in Australia too if you wanted to. With the salary, for many years, you probably won't be well off or rich, but unless you're doctor, i think that's the same for all of us in the allied health professions in the nhs.

I really have no idea if it's a difficult career I'm terms of learning mechanisms, But so far in uni, all I know is that theres a lot of science and medical-based learning through lectures and that we have to do a lot of graph reading, learning how equipment works, how to work well and be part of the nhs, clinical skills and that we are going to learn a lot of it on placement in actual hospitals for several weeks too (over the 3 years). I do also know that atm, there is demand for cardiac physiologists, so that's good.

The only website that I found to be really helpful was the prospects website:
https://www.prospects.ac.uk/case-stu...aneliese-lagan
https://www.prospects.ac.uk/job-prof...rdiac-sciences
https://www.prospects.ac.uk/careers-...ree/physiology

If you aren't applying for this ucas cycle, it would be good to shadow one in a hospital first to get a better idea or contact universities who offer the course directly with these questions and they'd be happy to answer them
Thank you so much, this has been so useful. One thing I still don’t understand is whether cardiac physiologists are classed as clinical scientists? And what it means by specialised cardiac physiology does that include another degree?
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by Drew Wolf)
Thank you so much, this has been so useful. One thing I still don’t understand is whether cardiac physiologists are classed as clinical scientists? And what it means by specialised cardiac physiology does that include another degree?
Cardiac physiology is one of a range of careers associated with the NHS Practitioner Training Programme (PTP), which trains healthcare scientists, namely physiologists and biomedical scientists, and a few other roles, in various specialisms, through the "Healthcare Sciences" degree programmes. There is a lot of information here: https://nshcs.hee.nhs.uk/programmes/ptp/

Some of those programmes specify the specialism from the start e.g. Healthcare Sciences (Cardiac Physiology), or Healthcare Sciences (Blood Sciences), while others allow you start in a more general area and choose a specialism after starting, e.g. Healthcare Sciences (Physiological Sciences) of Healthcare Sciences (Life Sciences). To become a cardiac physiologist you would need to complete a Healthcare Sciences (Cardiac Physiology) course, or a Healthcare Sciences (Physiological Sciences) and follow the cardiac physiology specialism track within that course. You will be specialised as a cardiac physiologist through either route by the end of the degree.

As above you will start off at band 5. I'm don't know much about progression for physiologists in the scheme; for biomedical scientists, I've been told normally to progress to band 6 requires the completion of the specialist portfolio once you are employed as a band 5 BMS in the NHS (which I understand is more or less inevitable, so is virtually an automatic progression). Progression to band 7 for BMSs apparently requires the completion of an appropriate MSc course, or to demonstrate equivalent achievement through a professional portfolio. This seems more of a mixed bag, since demonstrating masters level competence through a professional portfolio might take quite a while and be difficult in some ways, while the MSc route you would probably want to do while working which might be quite intense or limit your options of course provider/study mode.

Hope this helps, and good luck RegisteredBMS was on the BMS side of the PTP, and is now working as a BMS in the NHS, might know how the physiological sciences side works to some extent?
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Drew Wolf
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(Original post by kawaii sashimi)
Hiya!
I just started doing this at uni this year, so I'm not too knowledgeable about it, but this is what I got from talking to the older years and staff when I was applying and wondering the same thing. (There really should be more about it online! )

My lecturers did practice in the field and they can safely say they that they definitely enjoyed their careers so far. Some of them still practise part of the time and the other times they're at my uni teaching us. The salary differs regionally, but from what I've been told, once you qualify, you're eligible to start at band 5 on the nhs salary. Tbh, at the time I didn't really know what band 5 meant, but, what I did was Google 'cardiac physiologist jobs' (followed by the city I'm in) and then you can get a rough idea. With career progression and promotion, I do think that it takes a long time. I did see a senior cardiac physiologist working in the hospital but he was kinda old, so I think it's safe to say, that it takes a long time, as with any career. However, there is a clear path of progression and some hospitals after you've gotten a job with them, do pay for you to take courses to help you with that progression like doing echocardiography courses etc, to allow you to be 'promoted' or move up the bands. I think in terms of getting a job and starting, it's a good idea to do a cardiac physiology degree that's accredited for example by the hcpc. There are also now some apprenticeship type courses too btw! E.g. in middlesex university.

Back in september I talked to some people who had just graduated from uni, and qualified as well, and they all had found jobs within 6 months of leaving university and were relatively happy. One person even said that you can qualify here and work in Australia too if you wanted to. With the salary, for many years, you probably won't be well off or rich, but unless you're doctor, i think that's the same for all of us in the allied health professions in the nhs.

I really have no idea if it's a difficult career I'm terms of learning mechanisms, But so far in uni, all I know is that theres a lot of science and medical-based learning through lectures and that we have to do a lot of graph reading, learning how equipment works, how to work well and be part of the nhs, clinical skills and that we are going to learn a lot of it on placement in actual hospitals for several weeks too (over the 3 years). I do also know that atm, there is demand for cardiac physiologists, so that's good.

The only website that I found to be really helpful was the prospects website:
https://www.prospects.ac.uk/case-stu...aneliese-lagan
https://www.prospects.ac.uk/job-prof...rdiac-sciences
https://www.prospects.ac.uk/careers-...ree/physiology

If you aren't applying for this ucas cycle, it would be good to shadow one in a hospital first to get a better idea or contact universities who offer the course directly with these questions and they'd be happy to answer them
Hello again, I have one more question; how much maths and physics is involved in cardiac physiology? Is it a huge amount? Is it difficult?
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