Help! I dont know what to take notes from for A level physics Watch

Azimbrook1
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So I think that the a level AQA endoresed textbook by jim breithaupt is ABSOLUTELY terrible. It's just full of useless, irrelevant information.Also, the CGP revision guide is far too brief for me, and it contains some uneeded information. So I don't know what to take notes from anymore. My only other options are online revision guides ( if you have any, can you link/name them?) and Youtube videos. I understand that the main thing is practice Qs, but I also want to understand the content
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nzy
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I always just have the spec open whilst I'm going through the textbook so I can pick out the bits of information I need.
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Azimbrook1
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(Original post by nzy)
I always just have the spec open whilst I'm going through the textbook so I can pick out the bits of information I need
But don't you think that reading all that is a waste of time? also,why dont you use the revision guide? and do you do new spec?
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nzy
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(Original post by Azimbrook1)
But don't you think that reading all that is a waste of time? also,why dont you use the revision guide? and do you do new spec?
Like you said, the cgp guide on its own is too brief if you're actually trying to understand a topic, but it sticks much closer to the specification. The oxford AQA textbook, on the other hand, rambles on a bit, but I find that a lot of the 'useless, irrelevant information' is worth just reading and helps with putting all the information you do need into context, which is really what you'll need in the exam.
I usually just have the spec, textbook and cgp guide open on separate tabs while I'm writing my notes and between them scrap together all the notes I think I need. It's not a waste of time - fair enough, other people might find different ways of studying easier, but after I've gone through every chapter (even if I haven't written some bits of it down), I feel a lot more confident that I've understood everything I need to than if I had just had copied from some website with the bare minimum from each topic.
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Azimbrook1
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(Original post by nzy)
Like you said, the cgp guide on its own is too brief if you're actually trying to understand a topic, but it sticks much closer to the specification. The oxford AQA textbook, on the other hand, rambles on a bit, but I find that a lot of the 'useless, irrelevant information' is worth just reading and helps with putting all the information you do need into context, which is really what you'll need in the exam.
I usually just have the spec, textbook and cgp guide open on separate tabs while I'm writing my notes and between them scrap together all the notes I think I need. It's not a waste of time - fair enough, other people might find different ways of studying easier, but after I've gone through every chapter (even if I haven't written some bits of it down), I feel a lot more confident that I've understood everything I need to than if I had just had copied from some website with the bare minimum from each topic.
(Original post by nzy)
Like you said, the cgp guide on its own is too brief if you're actually trying to understand a topic, but it sticks much closer to the specification. The oxford AQA textbook, on the other hand, rambles on a bit, but I find that a lot of the 'useless, irrelevant information' is worth just reading and helps with putting all the information you do need into context, which is really what you'll need in the exam.
I usually just have the spec, textbook and cgp guide open on separate tabs while I'm writing my notes and between them scrap together all the notes I think I need. It's not a waste of time - fair enough, other people might find different ways of studying easier, but after I've gone through every chapter (even if I haven't written some bits of it down), I feel a lot more confident that I've understood everything I need to than if I had just had copied from some website with the bare minimum from each topic.
doesn't that take you a while? I thought that most of your time should be spent doing past papers? At least that's what my teacher said.
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Sinnoh
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I think that textbook is alright!
My advice, go through the summary questions in each topic. If you can't answer one, read those pages because the info you need will always be there. Then you make a note of it, and finish the question. That will help you understand the content and also learn how to use it.
Also you'd be surprised how much of it isn't irrelevant.

https://global.oup.com/education/con...ers/?region=uk
these are the answers to the end-of-chapter practice questions btw.
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Azimbrook1
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(Original post by Sinnoh)
I think that textbook is alright!
My advice, go through the summary questions in each topic. If you can't answer one, read those pages because the info you need will always be there. Then you make a note of it, and finish the question. That will help you understand the content and also learn how to use it.
Also you'd be surprised how much of it isn't irrelevant.

https://global.oup.com/education/con...ers/?region=uk
these are the answers to the end-of-chapter practice questions btw.
But what if there's a piece of information that's not in the summary Qs,but in the text, that's I'll need for my exam ? - and Thank you for the answers
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Sinnoh
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(Original post by Azimbrook1)
But what if there's a piece of information that's not in the summary Qs,but in the text, that's I'll need for my exam ? - and Thank you for the answers
A lot of the time you're using the same info in different ways when you do questions. Anyway, just do enough questions and that won't be a problem.
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CurryCurry2468
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I agree with you on that. The AQA endorsed textbook is good in some apsects but for others such as forces and equilibrium it is not that good (some of the worked examples seem unclear).
For each topic i watch a video from 'science shorts' on youtube and just make a mindmap for the key ideas in that topic.
I make flashcards from seneca learning as it will help me recall facts quicker since i can easily test myself.
I only really use the textbook for the practice questions.
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CurryCurry2468
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(Original post by nzy)
I always just have the spec open whilst I'm going through the textbook so I can pick out the bits of information I need.
I also do that. It is a really good strategy since the spec essentially tells you what you need to know for the exam.
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GreenCub
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Other users have already given you some advice in what to take notes on, but I thought I'd add my 2 cents (I'm in year 13 doing OCR A level physics). Obviously you need to have notes, but it's usually better to practice questions than spend lots of time reading over notes or copying out another set of revision notes.
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