Asp.net local council developing/supporting work

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Aqua boy
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#1
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
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I have a potential interview.

What is it they are likely to do? This is for my local council. And I've noticed similar jobs themes. Maybe in the future I could be doing a similar role.

They use asp.net and the job requires me to use asp.net for developing/supporting work. And also SQL.

Is this something I can do/replicate at home such as create my own pages on asp.net, loop over the data?

What sort of programming work in technical details will I be required to do?

Thanks in advance
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winterscoming
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Yes you can definitely learn and use ASP.NET at home - pretty much everything you'd need is all freely available online from Microsoft.

If they use ASP.NET then it's very likely that they also use some of the other following technologies:

  • .NET Framework - Any version from 4.5 up to 4.7.2 or maybe the latest 4.8
  • C# language - any of the recent versions, but C# 6.0 or 7.0 are the ones most people use.
  • Microsoft SQL Server (database) -- For this you'd probably be expected to learn the basic SQL commands such as SELECT, FROM, WHERE, JOIN. You can download the "developer edition" of SQL server for free from Microsoft (You will also want the SQL Management Studio app too)
  • Microsoft Entity Framework (for linking C# with a SQL server database)
  • Visual Studio 2019 (You can get hold of the Community Edition for free) -- particularly being able to use its Debugger
  • NuGet Package Manager (part of Visual Studio)
  • Google Chrome and the "F12" web developer tools (Any browser will do, but I think Chrome has better tools. Firefox is also decent. )
  • Microsoft IIS web server (This is a feature of Windows that you can enable )
  • Model-View-Controller design pattern for structuring the web app
  • ASP.NET MVC Framework utilities for things like submitting HTML forms, HTML input form validation,
  • HTML pages generated using "Razor" views (Razor is the name of a really neat hybrid syntax between C# and HTML which takes most of the tedious work out of building more sophisticated web apps with lots of different areas and pages, as well as displaying data in those pages)
  • CSS, and maybe Bootstrap -- Bootstrap is excellent for things like your site layout, navigation and a lot of UI "controls" to make the site look more sleek and professional. .
  • JavaScript, maybe JQuery as well.
  • C# configuration files which are built using XML
  • A Unit testing framework such as NUnit or MSTest
  • Source control software - probably Git. (Or possibly something older like subversion)

The kinds of tasks would probably be typical web development and software engineering tasks. For example:
  • Adding new features to the app - e.g. new pages, new web forms, adding/changing tables in the database, creating more logic on the back-end to support whatever stuff they need to do (e.g. generating reports from their data, importing data from somewhere, exporting it to a file, etc.)
  • Analysing and debugging defects in the code. That could include needing to reproduce problems which happen in a user's web browser then attempting to replicate the same issue on your development computer and debugging the code to find out what the problem is
  • Writing automated unit tests to cover new functionality that needs to be added to the system
  • Working within a software development lifecycle to analyse their users' requirements, understand what problems users want to solve and why, produce estimates on how long it might take to get the work done, write the code, test your code changes, and work within some kind of release and deployment process to move the code into the Live/Production environment for the real users
  • Constant collaboration and communication with your co-workers, QA testers, business analysts, and your supervisor/line-manager to keep on top of the work, make sure you're able to get on with the work, check that you're doing the right things, keep an eye on quality and get feedback through having your work reviewed by others.
  • Lastly, probably a great deal of Google'ing and learning by looking at examples on MSDN and StackOverflow as well as internet tutorials


Here's some free courses from Microsoft which will go into a lot of these technologies:

There's a nice little 'getting started' tutorial here too just for a very short introduction to using ASP.NET to create a "hello world" web app: https://dotnet.microsoft.com/apps/aspnet
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Aqua boy
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(Original post by winterscoming)
Yes you can definitely learn and use ASP.NET at home - pretty much everything you'd need is all freely available online from Microsoft.

If they use ASP.NET then it's very likely that they also use some of the other following technologies:

  • .NET Framework - Any version from 4.5 up to 4.7.2 or maybe the latest 4.8
  • C# language - any of the recent versions, but C# 6.0 or 7.0 are the ones most people use.
  • Microsoft SQL Server (database) -- For this you'd probably be expected to learn the basic SQL commands such as SELECT, FROM, WHERE, JOIN. You can download the "developer edition" of SQL server for free from Microsoft (You will also want the SQL Management Studio app too)
  • Microsoft Entity Framework (for linking C# with a SQL server database)
  • Visual Studio 2019 (You can get hold of the Community Edition for free) -- particularly being able to use its Debugger
  • NuGet Package Manager (part of Visual Studio)
  • Google Chrome and the "F12" web developer tools (Any browser will do, but I think Chrome has better tools. Firefox is also decent. )
  • Microsoft IIS web server (This is a feature of Windows that you can enable )
  • Model-View-Controller design pattern for structuring the web app
  • ASP.NET MVC Framework utilities for things like submitting HTML forms, HTML input form validation,
  • HTML pages generated using "Razor" views (Razor is the name of a really neat hybrid syntax between C# and HTML which takes most of the tedious work out of building more sophisticated web apps with lots of different areas and pages, as well as displaying data in those pages)
  • CSS, and maybe Bootstrap -- Bootstrap is excellent for things like your site layout, navigation and a lot of UI "controls" to make the site look more sleek and professional. .
  • JavaScript, maybe JQuery as well.
  • C# configuration files which are built using XML
  • A Unit testing framework such as NUnit or MSTest
  • Source control software - probably Git. (Or possibly something older like subversion)

The kinds of tasks would probably be typical web development and software engineering tasks. For example:
  • Adding new features to the app - e.g. new pages, new web forms, adding/changing tables in the database, creating more logic on the back-end to support whatever stuff they need to do (e.g. generating reports from their data, importing data from somewhere, exporting it to a file, etc.)
  • Analysing and debugging defects in the code. That could include needing to reproduce problems which happen in a user's web browser then attempting to replicate the same issue on your development computer and debugging the code to find out what the problem is
  • Writing automated unit tests to cover new functionality that needs to be added to the system
  • Working within a software development lifecycle to analyse their users' requirements, understand what problems users want to solve and why, produce estimates on how long it might take to get the work done, write the code, test your code changes, and work within some kind of release and deployment process to move the code into the Live/Production environment for the real users
  • Constant collaboration and communication with your co-workers, QA testers, business analysts, and your supervisor/line-manager to keep on top of the work, make sure you're able to get on with the work, check that you're doing the right things, keep an eye on quality and get feedback through having your work reviewed by others.
  • Lastly, probably a great deal of Google'ing and learning by looking at examples on MSDN and StackOverflow as well as internet tutorials


Here's some free courses from Microsoft which will go into a lot of these technologies:

There's a nice little 'getting started' tutorial here too just for a very short introduction to using ASP.NET to create a "hello world" web app: https://dotnet.microsoft.com/apps/aspnet
This is an excellent reply.

Thank you very much .
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winterscoming
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(Original post by Aqua boy)
This is an excellent reply.

Thank you very much .
You're welcome - I've been working with ASP.NET for quite a while, so i'm pretty familiar with all the stuff people use it for and all the other tools/tech that normally go with it. It's quite a lot to learn at first, but that's just normal with web development; it takes months to finally get used to everything, but you would probably be working alongside a team of experienced engineers as well as a mentor to ask loads of questions and help when you're stuck.

The company I work at has got lot of Degree-Apprentices who need to learn all of this stuff from scratch when they join (i.e. people who are fresh out of A-Levels, although they're usually people who have done A-Level or BTEC CompSci, so they're usually good with Python or something similar). It's still a lot for them to learn though - Even the ones who are really good with Python and fairly confident programmers usually take 3-6 months (at 30hrs/week) to even begin to appreciate how it all fits together. That's normal though, and I'm sure any employer would expect that
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