Navboi
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Hi guys quick question,

When two point masses in space are attracted to each other as a result of their masses, is this an example of newtons third law? Both forces are equal and are opposite in direction, but due to the technicality of gravity always being an attractive force, I'm a bit confused. I remember my teacher explaining this, but I cant remember what he said.

Any help?
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wishiwerenthere
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I think that it would be because it's an example where two of the same type of force are acting upon two objects?
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mnot
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(Original post by Navboi)
Hi guys quick question,

When two point masses in space are attracted to each other as a result of their masses, is this an example of newtons third law? Both forces are equal and are opposite in direction, but due to the technicality of gravity always being an attractive force, I'm a bit confused. I remember my teacher explaining this, but I cant remember what he said.

Any help?
Yes, its an example of Newtons 3rd law, both objects are pulling on each other

this makes it applicable to Newtonian mechanics,
gravity is also part of quantum mechanics so its worth noting gravity is a big part of both classical physics and the quantum levels.
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