So im making notes but thats it Watch

Anonymous #1
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So im making notes but don't knwo what to do with them. So basically I create a word document from the slides. WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING? help me please... I am so behind already
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Hazzabear
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(Original post by Anonymous)
So im making notes but don't knwo what to do with them. So basically I create a word document from the slides. WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING? help me please... I am so behind already
What subject is this for firstly?
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Hazzabear)
What subject is this for firstly?
medical related subject
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black tea
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(Original post by Anonymous)
So im making notes but don't knwo what to do with them. So basically I create a word document from the slides. WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING? help me please... I am so behind already
I'm not really sure what your question is - are you asking how to store your notes or are you asking how to study?
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Acsel
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(Original post by Anonymous)
So im making notes but don't knwo what to do with them. So basically I create a word document from the slides. WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING? help me please... I am so behind already
It seems you are effectively asking how to study. There's no easy answer here. But some key points:

You're making notes from some sort of presentation. Do the notes make sense and do you understand them? If you're simply copying information without trying to understand it then you are doing it wrong. If you don't understand, then you need to do some research. Find relevant textbooks, reread the slides, watch videos, etc. There's no right or wrong method, but you need to find a way to go from not understanding to understanding. Beyond that, you need to verify your understanding. A lot of people think they understand something, but actually do not or their understanding is mistaken in some way.

Secondly, what are these notes for? Presumably you are going to be assessed in some form, maybe by exam? If that's the case, then can you recall the notes without looking at them? If not, you need to revise. Again, lots of methods. Some people will rewrite their notes, others like to use colour and diagrams, some people would rather teach the material to some else, some people like mock exams and so on. You need to find a way to remember the information that works for you, in such a way that you can recall it when you need to.

Putting the above two together, at some point you should be able to recall the information and explain it in your own words. This is the bare minimum required to understand and apply the knowledge but you may also be asked to draw your own conclusions, create new arguments or manipulate the information in some other way outside simply recalling it.

Information is basically broken down into 3 categories. There's the stuff you know (you can recall it and you understand it), the stuff you're aware you don't know (maybe you don't understand it, or you can't remember it, or both) and the stuff you aren't aware you don't know (you don't know this stuff because you don't even know it exists). For stuff you do know, you're in a good place. For stuff you're aware you don't know, that's where revision is important, to ensure you understand and can recall when required. And for the stuff you aren't aware of, that's the first part of your study. Effectively the slides are making you aware of things (going from you don't know it exists to you do know it exists) but you need to go from knowing it exists to understanding and recalling the information.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Acsel)
It seems you are effectively asking how to study. There's no easy answer here. But some key points:

You're making notes from some sort of presentation. Do the notes make sense and do you understand them? If you're simply copying information without trying to understand it then you are doing it wrong. If you don't understand, then you need to do some research. Find relevant textbooks, reread the slides, watch videos, etc. There's no right or wrong method, but you need to find a way to go from not understanding to understanding. Beyond that, you need to verify your understanding. A lot of people think they understand something, but actually do not or their understanding is mistaken in some way.

Secondly, what are these notes for? Presumably you are going to be assessed in some form, maybe by exam? If that's the case, then can you recall the notes without looking at them? If not, you need to revise. Again, lots of methods. Some people will rewrite their notes, others like to use colour and diagrams, some people would rather teach the material to some else, some people like mock exams and so on. You need to find a way to remember the information that works for you, in such a way that you can recall it when you need to.

Putting the above two together, at some point you should be able to recall the information and explain it in your own words. This is the bare minimum required to understand and apply the knowledge but you may also be asked to draw your own conclusions, create new arguments or manipulate the information in some other way outside simply recalling it.

Information is basically broken down into 3 categories. There's the stuff you know (you can recall it and you understand it), the stuff you're aware you don't know (maybe you don't understand it, or you can't remember it, or both) and the stuff you aren't aware you don't know (you don't know this stuff because you don't even know it exists). For stuff you do know, you're in a good place. For stuff you're aware you don't know, that's where revision is important, to ensure you understand and can recall when required. And for the stuff you aren't aware of, that's the first part of your study. Effectively the slides are making you aware of things (going from you don't know it exists to you do know it exists) but you need to go from knowing it exists to understanding and recalling the information.
I am copying the points out word-by-word but I think that's not helpful at all. I don't want to write them out in my own words because that will just add unnecessary words, perhaps I can condense it. After I have written the notes out, do I re-read them the next day, the next month?

Also, I can never recall my notes without reading them... what do you mean by that?

If you don't mind me asking what's your study routine like.
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Acsel
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I am copying the points out word-by-word but I think that's not helpful at all. I don't want to write them out in my own words because that will just add unnecessary words, perhaps I can condense it. After I have written the notes out, do I re-read them the next day, the next month?

Also, I can never recall my notes without reading them... what do you mean by that?

If you don't mind me asking what's your study routine like.
I would strongly recommend against just copying things word for word. Anyone can look at a book and copy it word for word without actually putting any thought into it. This is probably why you don't think it's that helpful, because it doesn't make you think. Putting things in your own words is a good idea because it forces you to think about what all these words mean in context. Don't worry if you're adding words at first, this is often necessary to get the explanation down.

You want to be reading your notes as often as necessary. I'll note that simply reading them is not by itself the best way of practicing. It can also become pretty boring and monotonous. Rather than focusing on how often you read, you need to consider the end goal. You probably have an exam to sit, which requires some knowledge, which you'll need to recall without notes, so you make notes in order to revise. The end goal is to be able to recall the information so that you can apply it in the exam, not to read your notes 5, 10 or 50 times. The number doesn't matter, the goal is to learn the material.

This is predominantly what I mean by recalling your notes without reading them. When you sit your exam, you probably won't have all your notes available. You need to be able to answer questions without notes, which at a minimum means you need to recall notes without just reading from them. You need to commit the stuff in your notes to memory, so that it can be recalled when you don't have access to the notes.

I'll answer the question on study routine, but I'll preface it with a warning. Knowing how other people study is not something that can often be applied to yourself. I'll try and keep my answer broad to give you ideas, but that doesn't mean it's perfectly applicable. Different people study in different ways and it is important for you to find out for yourself what does and does not work for you. If you need to take lots of breaks, can only work for 30 minutes before getting bored, needs lots of colour and pictures, etc. then don't listen to people who say they jsut read their notes or 8 hours a day. With that in mind:

Typically for every class I do some sort of prereading. It might be a quick glance over the upcoming lecture slides and practical work, or reading a textbook, or just Googling stuff I don't understand. During the class I'll make minimal notes, mostly focusing on what the lecturer is saying rather than copying down word for word what is on the slides. I have access to the slides later but probably don't have access to what the lecturer said. I focus purely on getting the information down on paper, with no concern for how it looks or the words I use. At some point after a class (ideally the same day) I'll read through the slides again, making notes of all the key points in tandem with the notes I wrote myself in class. I'll also reference textbooks or Google stuff. The goal here is to have a copy of everything I need to know about a module.

When exams start to roll around, I'll make a revised set of notes. I'll work out what it is I understand and what I don't understand, then focus on the stuff I don't get. Ideally by this time, I do actually understand everything and need to focus more on communicating that understanding than outright learning the material. This condensed set of notes then forms the basis of my revision. I'm very fortunate to have a good memory, and by the time I've done some prereading, listened to the lecture and written my notes out formally I've committed most stuff to memory. I'm aware that a lot of people need to be far more effort into remembering stuff. Other than that, I'll do exam prep and other practical practice to prepare. That's pretty much it. I do a fairly practical course, so a lot of what I do doesn't resolve around "studying" per se.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Acsel)
I would strongly recommend against just copying things word for word. Anyone can look at a book and copy it word for word without actually putting any thought into it. This is probably why you don't think it's that helpful, because it doesn't make you think. Putting things in your own words is a good idea because it forces you to think about what all these words mean in context. Don't worry if you're adding words at first, this is often necessary to get the explanation down.

You want to be reading your notes as often as necessary. I'll note that simply reading them is not by itself the best way of practicing. It can also become pretty boring and monotonous. Rather than focusing on how often you read, you need to consider the end goal. You probably have an exam to sit, which requires some knowledge, which you'll need to recall without notes, so you make notes in order to revise. The end goal is to be able to recall the information so that you can apply it in the exam, not to read your notes 5, 10 or 50 times. The number doesn't matter, the goal is to learn the material.

This is predominantly what I mean by recalling your notes without reading them. When you sit your exam, you probably won't have all your notes available. You need to be able to answer questions without notes, which at a minimum means you need to recall notes without just reading from them. You need to commit the stuff in your notes to memory, so that it can be recalled when you don't have access to the notes.

I'll answer the question on study routine, but I'll preface it with a warning. Knowing how other people study is not something that can often be applied to yourself. I'll try and keep my answer broad to give you ideas, but that doesn't mean it's perfectly applicable. Different people study in different ways and it is important for you to find out for yourself what does and does not work for you. If you need to take lots of breaks, can only work for 30 minutes before getting bored, needs lots of colour and pictures, etc. then don't listen to people who say they jsut read their notes or 8 hours a day. With that in mind:

Typically for every class I do some sort of prereading. It might be a quick glance over the upcoming lecture slides and practical work, or reading a textbook, or just Googling stuff I don't understand. During the class I'll make minimal notes, mostly focusing on what the lecturer is saying rather than copying down word for word what is on the slides. I have access to the slides later but probably don't have access to what the lecturer said. I focus purely on getting the information down on paper, with no concern for how it looks or the words I use. At some point after a class (ideally the same day) I'll read through the slides again, making notes of all the key points in tandem with the notes I wrote myself in class. I'll also reference textbooks or Google stuff. The goal here is to have a copy of everything I need to know about a module.

When exams start to roll around, I'll make a revised set of notes. I'll work out what it is I understand and what I don't understand, then focus on the stuff I don't get. Ideally by this time, I do actually understand everything and need to focus more on communicating that understanding than outright learning the material. This condensed set of notes then forms the basis of my revision. I'm very fortunate to have a good memory, and by the time I've done some prereading, listened to the lecture and written my notes out formally I've committed most stuff to memory. I'm aware that a lot of people need to be far more effort into remembering stuff. Other than that, I'll do exam prep and other practical practice to prepare. That's pretty much it. I do a fairly practical course, so a lot of what I do doesn't resolve around "studying" per se.
Thanks again - everything you've said is going to be really useful in adjusting my studying technique.

Are there anyways I can improve my memory. I read stuff from slides and can hardly remember anything from them the next day. I study a healthcare subject so there's quite a lot of theory to understand before approaching the practical stuff
Also, do you make hand notes or do you type them up? How do you organise your notes? Do you ever make flashcards from your lecture notes?
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Acsel
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Thanks again - everything you've said is going to be really useful in adjusting my studying technique.

Are there anyways I can improve my memory. I read stuff from slides and can hardly remember anything from them the next day. I study a healthcare subject so there's quite a lot of theory to understand before approaching the practical stuff
Also, do you make hand notes or do you type them up? How do you organise your notes? Do you ever make flashcards from your lecture notes?
Theres loads of different techniques, Google is your friend for finding long lists of stuff you can try. It pretty much just comes down to trying stuff and seeing what works. Some people (myself included) like working in complete silence, whereas others want some background noise. Some people don't do well reading notes and would rather have stuff dictated to them, so they record their notes and listen to them instead of reading. Some people use colour systems, such as highlighting key points or certain topics in different colours. Some people do totally silly stuff, like coming up with a song or dance to give themselves a really clear memory of something in the exam. Personally I find that silly, totally absurd stuff works really well because of how it creates memories. Honestly there isn't a right or wrong answer though because we all learn differently, you just need to try stuff and find what works.

I make all my notes by hand, and tend to recommend the same to others. There's lots of research out there that suggests hand written notes are better for your memory over typed notes. It's also good handwriting practice if you have handwritten exams. I'm a Computer Science-esque course so unsurprisingly a lot of people type their notes, then complain about handwritten exams because they haven't practiced. It's also a lot easier to just write digital notes, save them and never got back to them. Paper handwritten notes are difficult to ignore when you've got stacks of paper piling up.

For organisation I just have a single book (just a regular Pukka Pad Project Book), with sections for each module. Different folders or binders can work too, but I don't really have enough notes to justify it. I'm quite a simply person when it comes to organising; I was never a fan of coming up with complex oragnisation systems or spending too much time on it. When it comes to exams, I take the important parts of my notes from the book and just write them on regular paper. I try to condense things down as much as possible, removing all superfluous words and will typically get it down to a couple of pages. Your mileage will vary though, especially if you have a content heavy course.

I've tried flashcards but they didn't really do anything for me. They work for some people, but I never noticed a difference compared to just reading my notes regularly.
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