when should you have started hospital work experience for medicine application Watch

HASSSSSSSSS
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I'm in year 12 and it's currently november. I have been trying to sort out work experience in a hospital or volunteering in a hospice but i've only managed to get a volunteering place at a charity shop so far. is that bad? or is it normal since it's only just november? i don't have any sort of connection or any thing and I live in London btw
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Wired_1800
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(Original post by HASSSSSSSSS)
I'm in year 12 and it's currently november. I have been trying to sort out work experience in a hospital or volunteering in a hospice but i've only managed to get a volunteering place at a charity shop so far. is that bad? or is it normal since it's only just november? i don't have any sort of connection or any thing and I live in London btw
I think you should go to several local GP surgeries and hospitals to ask for some work experience. Dress smart and try to speak with a Dr, Nurse or Receptionist.
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HASSSSSSSSS
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(Original post by Wired_1800)
I think you should go to several local GP surgeries and hospitals to ask for some work experience. Dress smart and try to speak with a Dr, Nurse or Receptionist.
thanks for the advice
Do you think that will be better than just calling them?
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Wired_1800
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(Original post by HASSSSSSSSS)
thanks for the advice
Do you think that will be better than just calling them?
I think it is alright to call, but some people like physical contact. To me, I’d physically visit some practices and hospitals that are local then call the rest. If you have a local uni with a medical school or medical sciences department, maybe you can reach out to them too.

In London, you have Kings, UCL, Imperial etc.
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GANFYD
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(Original post by HASSSSSSSSS)
thanks for the advice
Do you think that will be better than just calling them?
If you just turn up on spec, you are likely to significantly annoy people or be unable to identify the people you should be talking to. Start with a phone call or email and follw up with an email with a polite request, directed to HR in hospitals (or ask if they have a specific department) or the Practice Manager in general practice
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GANFYD
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(Original post by Wired_1800)
I think it is alright to call, but some people like physical contact. To me, I’d physically visit some practices and hospitals that are local then call the rest. If you have a local uni with a medical school or medical sciences department, maybe you can reach out to them too.

In London, you have Kings, UCL, Imperial etc.
Nobody wants physical contact in the first instance. They will all be busy doing other things and just not meet with someone or be very irritated. Better to call or email and then visit if they ask to meet you
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Wired_1800
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(Original post by GANFYD)
Nobody wants physical contact in the first instance. They will all be busy doing other things and just not meet with someone or be very irritated. Better to call or email and then visit if they ask to meet you
Why did you just generalise like that? People are different and you never know which ones like to be approached.
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nexttime
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(Original post by Wired_1800)
Why did you just generalise like that? People are different and you never know which ones like to be approached.
It is a generalisation, but an accurate one. Just turning up to someone's office, should you be able to find it, is weird at best, a perceived security threat and getting asked to leave at worst.

I would encourage phone calls in the first instance.
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Wired_1800
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(Original post by nexttime)
It is a generalisation, but an accurate one. Just turning up to someone's office, should you be able to find it, is weird at best, a perceived security threat and getting asked to leave at worst.

I would encourage phone calls in the first instance.
In my opinion, it is the way that it is done, that was why I added receptionists. If the OP went to a big hospital, the receptionist may be able to help find someone. This is work experience and not asking for their left arm.
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squeakysquirrel
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(Original post by Wired_1800)
Why did you just generalise like that? People are different and you never know which ones like to be approached.
Believe me the GP surgeries are inundated with potential medical students wanting work experience. My husband is a solicitor and he gets several emails a week asking the same. Drives him nuts
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Wired_1800
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(Original post by squeakysquirrel)
Believe me the GP surgeries are inundated with potential medical students wanting work experience. My husband is a solicitor and he gets several emails a week asking the same. Drives him nuts
Fair. So how do you suggest OP goes about it? Offer solutions ...
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squeakysquirrel
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(Original post by Wired_1800)
Fair. So how do you suggest OP goes about it? Offer solutions ...
Care homes are always good - reading to the residents, volunteering in a charity shop ( BHF) looks good. Hospitals run volunteer schemes - I know mine does. Fund raising for charities - you will get something off the back of that.

Yes - GP surgeries too but be careful - they do get fed up with all the students
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(Original post by Wired_1800)
In my opinion, it is the way that it is done, that was why I added receptionists. If the OP went to a big hospital, the receptionist may be able to help find someone. This is work experience and not asking for their left arm.
Receptionists are too busy to be looking for someobody a person might talk to about work experience (if they even knew who that was) and would likely tell them to call or email (or just sorry, can't help!).
A big hospital will employ hundreds of people and a receptionist is not likely to know who co-ordinates work experience.
If someone turned up, without an appointment, at my surgery asking for work experience, then the answer would be no, as they have clearly zero insight into a busy working day, and I know many othr medics who would feel the same. It is not professional to turn up, on the off chance, and try to speak to people about this sort of thing.
Call or email (or both) first
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(Original post by GANFYD)
Receptionists are too busy to be looking for someobody a person might talk to about work experience (if they even knew who that was) and would likely tell them to call or email (or just sorry, can't help!)....
Exactly. There are at least several dozens receptionists in a hospital - in the main reception (usually only directing patients to wards / other departments), medical outpatients, surgical outpatients, A&E, endoscopy, maternity unit etc. etc. Every ward may also have a receptionist. There is no way that all the receptionists will know how to direct a student randomly turning up to ask for work experience.

Emailing is the way forward - work experience is scheduled weeks, if not months in advance, not haphazardly arranged after a 5 minute chat with a random receptionist. For a start, doctors are not available for shadowing all the time (even me - I have meetings that people shadowing me can't go to. Other times I will usually accommodate anyone and everyone).

In our hospital, the work experience person is not even based in the hospital building itself, but in the medical school building which is a seperate structure. Many doctors (let alone receptionists) don't even know the existence of this place - and the work experience itself is fully booked more than half a year in advance (currently it's accepting bookings for August / September 2020).
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squeakysquirrel
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https://www.imperial.nhs.uk/careers/...ork-experience

https://www.mtw.nhs.uk/working-for-u...rk-experience/
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DGeorge13
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(Original post by HASSSSSSSSS)
I'm in year 12 and it's currently november. I have been trying to sort out work experience in a hospital or volunteering in a hospice but i've only managed to get a volunteering place at a charity shop so far. is that bad? or is it normal since it's only just november? i don't have any sort of connection or any thing and I live in London btw
Maybe try for some care home or hospital volunteering- look online at local places now and maybe hope to start after Christmas - you may have to be slightly persistent but I know care homes are normally happy to help out. Some organisations run activities for children with disabilities and they have voluntary and sometimes paid jobs available for 16/17 year olds. Please don’t just turn up - not only is it unlikely to get you anywhere as you may irritate people and they are likely to be very busy but as others have said is also a bit strange
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Wired_1800
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(Original post by GANFYD)
Receptionists are too busy to be looking for someobody a person might talk to about work experience (if they even knew who that was) and would likely tell them to call or email (or just sorry, can't help!).
A big hospital will employ hundreds of people and a receptionist is not likely to know who co-ordinates work experience.
If someone turned up, without an appointment, at my surgery asking for work experience, then the answer would be no, as they have clearly zero insight into a busy working day, and I know many othr medics who would feel the same. It is not professional to turn up, on the off chance, and try to speak to people about this sort of thing.
Call or email (or both) first
I understand that point, but the issue is that it is very difficult to get a good opportunity without being proactive. Visiting a surgery can be beneficial, if a receptionist or a doctor/nurse sees the individual and then advises the kid about any opportunities. Cold calling doctors or nurses may be ignored because people just ignore them. Also, we know that many people ignore emails or send bland responses.
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Wired_1800
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(Original post by squeakysquirrel)
Care homes are always good - reading to the residents, volunteering in a charity shop ( BHF) looks good. Hospitals run volunteer schemes - I know mine does. Fund raising for charities - you will get something off the back of that.

Yes - GP surgeries too but be careful - they do get fed up with all the students
I agree.
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Democracy
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(Original post by Wired_1800)
I understand that point, but the issue is that it is very difficult to get a good opportunity without being proactive. Visiting a surgery can be beneficial, if a receptionist or a doctor/nurse sees the individual and then advises the kid about any opportunities. Cold calling doctors or nurses may be ignored because people just ignore them. Also, we know that many people ignore emails or send bland responses.
Well yeah, but that's not what happens in real life because people are busy working. A better approach would be to send an email or a letter - like the others have said.
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Wired_1800
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(Original post by Democracy)
Well yeah, but that's not what happens in real life because people are busy working. A better approach would be to send an email or a letter - like the others have said.
Ok, fair enough
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