esme05
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How do you revise unseen poetry for English? I'm really stuck, all help appreciated!
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GemGoth
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I usually kept practicing using unseen poems with perhaps similar themes,try ordering the cgp unseen poetry revision guide?you can also find unseen poem pairs on TES.practicing questions and asking your teacher to mark them is the best way but you can also just practice speed planning where you only spend 5(10 minutes when you start this technique)minutes planning answers to questions otherwise full answers can be marked by your teachers and you can get feedback.
Last edited by GemGoth; 1 week ago
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Little R
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Going over some common poetry techniques will help as well
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criticalem
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I just made large flashcards of context, form, structure, language, theme and comparisons using YouTube and annotations from school. learn about 6 of the poems in detail even if your teachers says learn all of them.
I managed to get a grade 9 in lit and language so it works haha
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username5008580
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(Original post by esme05)
How do you revise unseen poetry for English? I'm really stuck, all help appreciated!
In order to get the top marks, you need to talk about form, structure and language. All three of them. Therefore you should revise techniques for these.

For example, for form, consider if it's iambic pentameter/other meters, prose, sonnet, blank verse, free verse, rhyme scheme, what person narrative(I'm not sure if this is form or structure). Also stanza length, whether there are quatrains etc.

For structure, revise techniques which are harder to spot to get into the top band of marks. For example, fricatives, plosives, gutteral sounds, anadiplosis, anaphora, synesthesia etc.

For language, well when talking about words, don't say word but whether it is a verb or noun(what kind of noun? Abstract, common etc), imperative, conjunction etc. Talk about dissonance, pathos etc.

Also mood, tone, symbolism, irony and any other perceptive literary techniques.
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English2001
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Do not over complicate things. Do not spend 10 minutes trying to work out the rhythm and meter if you’re not going to make a valid point about it. Remember, unseen poetry is a comparison essay so you need to focus on the links between the poems or differences more than anything else. Do not waste your time learning the typicalities of every different era. While it is good to have some relevant context you can still get a top mark without it. You aren’t going to get extra marks for just dumping in irrelevant context. Also, in my exam both poems were post-modern and I included absolutely no context and still got pretty much full marks. Just worry about the theme in the question and revise your comparison techniques
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aciana
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(Original post by English2001)
Do not over complicate things. Do not spend 10 minutes trying to work out the rhythm and meter if you’re not going to make a valid point about it. Remember, unseen poetry is a comparison essay so you need to focus on the links between the poems or differences more than anything else. Do not waste your time learning the typicalities of every different era. While it is good to have some relevant context you can still get a top mark without it. You aren’t going to get extra marks for just dumping in irrelevant context. Also, in my exam both poems were post-modern and I included absolutely no context and still got pretty much full marks. Just worry about the theme in the question and revise your comparison techniques
(Original post by AnonymousGuest)
In order to get the top marks, you need to talk about form, structure and language. All three of them. Therefore you should revise techniques for these.

For example, for form, consider if it's iambic pentameter/other meters, prose, sonnet, blank verse, free verse, rhyme scheme, what person narrative(I'm not sure if this is form or structure). Also stanza length, whether there are quatrains etc.

For structure, revise techniques which are harder to spot to get into the top band of marks. For example, fricatives, plosives, gutteral sounds, anadiplosis, anaphora, synesthesia etc.

For language, well when talking about words, don't say word but whether it is a verb or noun(what kind of noun? Abstract, common etc), imperative, conjunction etc. Talk about dissonance, pathos etc.

Also mood, tone, symbolism, irony and any other perceptive literary techniques.
Some good advice there but you lost me on your "structure" bit, some of those are sounds (fricatives, plosives, guttural - I would add sibilant 's' to that list), some are rhetorical devices (anaphora, anadiplosis), and synaesthesia is some kind of neurological experience. I have never thought to use that word in poetry analysis, but it makes sense if the senses are being blended which they often are.
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esme05
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(Original post by AnonymousGuest)
In order to get the top marks, you need to talk about form, structure and language. All three of them. Therefore you should revise techniques for these.

For example, for form, consider if it's iambic pentameter/other meters, prose, sonnet, blank verse, free verse, rhyme scheme, what person narrative(I'm not sure if this is form or structure). Also stanza length, whether there are quatrains etc.

For structure, revise techniques which are harder to spot to get into the top band of marks. For example, fricatives, plosives, gutteral sounds, anadiplosis, anaphora, synesthesia etc.

For language, well when talking about words, don't say word but whether it is a verb or noun(what kind of noun? Abstract, common etc), imperative, conjunction etc. Talk about dissonance, pathos etc.

Also mood, tone, symbolism, irony and any other perceptive literary techniques.
wow thankyou!
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esme05
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(Original post by English2001)
Do not over complicate things. Do not spend 10 minutes trying to work out the rhythm and meter if you’re not going to make a valid point about it. Remember, unseen poetry is a comparison essay so you need to focus on the links between the poems or differences more than anything else. Do not waste your time learning the typicalities of every different era. While it is good to have some relevant context you can still get a top mark without it. You aren’t going to get extra marks for just dumping in irrelevant context. Also, in my exam both poems were post-modern and I included absolutely no context and still got pretty much full marks. Just worry about the theme in the question and revise your comparison techniques
thank you!!
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esme05
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(Original post by GemGoth)
I usually kept practicing using unseen poems with perhaps similar themes,try ordering the cgp unseen poetry revision guide?you can also find unseen poem pairs on TES.practicing questions and asking your teacher to mark them is the best way but you can also just practice speed planning where you only spend 5(10 minutes when you start this technique)minutes planning answers to questions otherwise full answers can be marked by your teachers and you can get feedback.
thankyou so much
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Tolgarda
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(Original post by AnonymousGuest)
For structure, revise techniques which are harder to spot to get into the top band of marks. For example, fricatives, plosives, gutteral sounds, anadiplosis, anaphora, synesthesia etc.

For language, well when talking about words, don't say word but whether it is a verb or noun(what kind of noun? Abstract, common etc), imperative, conjunction etc. Talk about dissonance, pathos etc.

Also mood, tone, symbolism, irony and any other perceptive literary techniques.
I don't get it. Why does it have to be so complicated? How intoxicated were the examiners when they awarded me full marks for poetry with basic as f*ck features? Hmm... Something tells me that it's the analysis that counts more than anything else. All of the things listed for structure would drive me insane if I had to revise them. The poor individual reading this might think that they have to wade through all of that **** to get in the top band. Not. At. All.

(Original post by English2001)
got pretty much full marks.
So, full marks? Nice. That makes two of us. Thank you for not saying to overcomplicate it. That was the kind of advice I was expecting to see.
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English2001
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(Original post by Tolgarda)
So, full marks? Nice. That makes two of us. Thank you for not saying to overcomplicate it. That was the kind of advice I was expecting to see.
Yeah I always alway think it’s better to focus on making sound links between the poems more than anything else. If your links are rubbish then all of language features etc are pointless. I know that I have never once spoken about rhythm or meter (because I really struggle to work it out). But that has never been a problem because it’s only relevant if you’re about to make an amazing point. All the advice on here seems to be very over complicated, I wouldn’t waste my time revising half of the suggestions on here tbh!
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Tolgarda
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(Original post by English2001)
Yeah I always alway think it’s better to focus on making sound links between the poems more than anything else. If your links are rubbish then all of language features etc are pointless. I know that I have never once spoken about rhythm or meter (because I really struggle to work it out). But that has never been a problem because it’s only relevant if you’re about to make an amazing point. All the advice on here seems to be very over complicated, I wouldn’t waste my time revising half of the suggestions on here tbh!
I wholeheartedly agree.

Also, are you American? It's spelt 'metre' here in British English in most contexts, including literary ones.
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English2001
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(Original post by Tolgarda)
I wholeheartedly agree.

Also, are you American? It's spelt 'metre' here in British English in most contexts, including literary ones.
I went to an international school in Spain to read my A Levels and the they taught us American spellings rather than English, thank you though!
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kawaii sashimi
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(Original post by esme05)
How do you revise unseen poetry for English? I'm really stuck, all help appreciated!
Look up mrbuff on YouTube, he has some fabulous resources, particularly for aqa and if you're doing power and conflict. If not, still look him up he talks about form, structure etc..
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esme05
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(Original post by kawaii sashimi)
Look up mrbuff on YouTube, he has some fabulous resources, particularly for aqa and if you're doing power and conflict. If not, still look him up he talks about form, structure etc..
brilliant, thankyou
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