Broken laptop key Watch

Saree
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#1
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Hi guys, well my problem is that my 'r' key on my laptop has stopped working, I am having to copy and paste the letter into this!

I am not too sure as to what stopped it from working but have taken the key off and tried pressing it like that and it still does not work, not looking too good, is my 'r' key gone completely? Or can it still be fixed if I take it into a repair shop?

Any help will be appreciated

Thank you
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Gazmatron
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Try getting it fixed for free off the manufacturers using the warranty.
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secretmessages
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Happens with me all the time. My 's' was dodgy for months until I decided to take it off and have a poke around. It may be that some dust (or other material) has got stuck, but that doesn't really explain why it still doesn't work when you take the key off. Hmm. I fixed mine by using an air duster on it (compressed air), which just basically got rid of all the dust and everything like that. So you could try that. If it's a problem with the actual electronics, then you're obviously best to take it to a repair shop and see what they can do, and of course see if it's covered by the warranty.
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Saree
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Ok, thanks for your replies, I went to a local repair shop and they said they will have to replace the entire keyboard, which will cost over £100!

Edit:: Just under 2 years old now (2 in sept)
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Spotty Dog
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How old is the laptop?
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Audrey Hepburn
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You don't need the letta to get by - just leave it, no one will even notice that it's not woiking... just say that you's a New Yoiker
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Ed.
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You can make a different key such as '§' your 'r' button instead (but don't ask me how!)
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Carlo08
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Right, if you smear Thick honey onto the key (Thin honey wont work for this) and then slowly wipe it off with an ear bud it will work. The honey attracts the electrons from the metasurface and induced a current strong enough to fix whatever problem there is (unless the board is broken) . Hope it helps.
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Ed.
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(Original post by Carlo08)
Right, if you smear Thick honey onto the key (Thin honey wont work for this) and then slowly wipe it off with an ear bud it will work. The honey attracts the electrons from the metasurface and induced a current strong enough to fix whatever problem there is (unless the board is broken) . Hope it helps.
Are you serious ? The honey will a) clog up the keys b) attract a plethora of hungry insects.
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Spotty Dog
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(Original post by Ed.)
Are you serious ? The honey will a) clog up the keys b) attract a plethora of hungry insects.
Thats what I thought.
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Audrey Hepburn
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(Original post by Ed.)
Are you serious ? The honey will a) clog up the keys b) attract a plethora of hungry insects.
And bears... don't forget bears :afraid:
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Ed.
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(Original post by Audrey Hepburn)
And bears... don't forget bears :afraid:
Oh yeah I forgot about bears :rolleyes: They are always hungry for honey.
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raspberrybubbles
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Whenever that's happened to me, I've rung up Dell and they've sent me a new keyboard for my laptop. Is that possible?
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Carlo08
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No really, Honey induces the circuit to work again and so will 'encourage' the key to work . You put it on, leave it for say 15 mins then wipe it with an earbud then try it. At first it may work but then stop at times so just repeat until it works fully.
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secretmessages
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(Original post by Carlo08)
Right, if you smear Thick honey onto the key (Thin honey wont work for this) and then slowly wipe it off with an ear bud it will work. The honey attracts the electrons from the metasurface and induced a current strong enough to fix whatever problem there is (unless the board is broken) . Hope it helps.
(Original post by Carlo08)
No really, Honey induces the circuit to work again and so will 'encourage' the key to work . You put it on, leave it for say 15 mins then wipe it with an earbud then try it. At first it may work but then stop at times so just repeat until it works fully.
Is this for lulz? It's not an animal, it sounds like tempting a lion to come out of it's cage for a piece of meat. If this works, then.. well.. I'd be amazed. Nevertheless, I've never tried it, so I don't know.
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Spotty Dog
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(Original post by Carlo08)
No really, Honey induces the circuit to work again and so will 'encourage' the key to work . You put it on, leave it for say 15 mins then wipe it with an earbud then try it. At first it may work but then stop at times so just repeat until it works fully.
Surely the honey will cause the key to stick when you depress it.

No matter how much you reassure me, there's no way I'll be pouring honey into my keyboard anytime soon..... :p:
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MGT_90
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(Original post by Carlo08)
No really, Honey induces the circuit to work again and so will 'encourage' the key to work . You put it on, leave it for say 15 mins then wipe it with an earbud then try it. At first it may work but then stop at times so just repeat until it works fully.
That would be a valid hypothesis if the whole way a scissor-switch keyboard operated changed.

A scissor-switch keyboard is effectively a variation on the rubber dome keyboard, allowing for shorter and sharper travel in a lower profile to accommodate a laptop's thinner frame. The contact is nevertheless completed by the dome that pushes down and makes contact with the board underneath.

The only way your proposal would work is if the damage was electrical, not mechanical in nature (that's an assumption you can't make given the information we have), and, assuming that to be the case, that you would have to pour honey not onto the keyboard, but onto the circuitry underneath, below the membrane layer. You'd probably have to remove the keyboard, split the layers, and spread the honey onto the circuitry itself. If you just poured it on top of the keyboard, you'd either just get honey on your keys, or honey on the membrane layer, not the circuitry.

And, after all that, even if it works, like Spotty Dog said, you'd have sticky keys.
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