ellaswords
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 3 days ago
#1
in the future, i aspire to be a teacher. i’ve always loved the idea of teaching & the idea of teaching primary school children is the one appealing the most to me right now. so, as i’m in year10 currently, i have the choice to do work experience this year. i’ve arranged to do my week of work experience at my own primary school & i’m really excited for it. i’ve known for a while that this is what i want to do, so i guess by doing my work experience it will either make me go ‘yes, this is the career path for me’ or ‘perhaps there’s something out there that i’m better suited for’.

so i was wondering, if i still wanted to be a teacher after my work experience, what are the available routes i could take to get into the profession. because, i know for most jobs, that there are multiple routes of getting selected to do that job, so is that also the case for teaching? if so, what are my options? will i have to select a levels that will increase my chances of getting my dream job or will they not matter that much?

any replies & help would be greatly appreciated
0
reply
ratatatat
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#2
Report 3 days ago
#2
(Original post by ellaswords)
in the future, i aspire to be a teacher. i’ve always loved the idea of teaching & the idea of teaching primary school children is the one appealing the most to me right now. so, as i’m in year10 currently, i have the choice to do work experience this year. i’ve arranged to do my week of work experience at my own primary school & i’m really excited for it. i’ve known for a while that this is what i want to do, so i guess by doing my work experience it will either make me go ‘yes, this is the career path for me’ or ‘perhaps there’s something out there that i’m better suited for’.

so i was wondering, if i still wanted to be a teacher after my work experience, what are the available routes i could take to get into the profession. because, i know for most jobs, that there are multiple routes of getting selected to do that job, so is that also the case for teaching? if so, what are my options? will i have to select a levels that will increase my chances of getting my dream job or will they not matter that much?

any replies & help would be greatly appreciated
Hiya, you're right in thinking there are a a few routes into teaching. Your two main pathways are either a Bachelors in Education with QTS, or a PGCE after a suitable degree of your choice. The BaEd is a faster route (three years), and is more teacher-focused as your lectures will cover primary teaching from the get go. The second is longer (a three year degree followed by a PGCE year) and will be less focused on teaching for the first three years. You'll have to fit a lot of learning into that PGCE year, but it gives you more options for the future. You have something to fall back on if the teaching doesn't work out for you. The BaEd will 'ease' you into speaking, so to speak, while the PGCE will get you stuck right in almost straight away. So, it's really a personal choice.

You'll need to start thinking about your GCSEs first; you'll need at least whatever an equivalent to C is (i'm old ) in maths, english and science. After that, you'll want to take A levels that are desirable for trainee teacher applicants. If you want to specialize in a subject (a lot of universities offer a specialism such as english/ maths/ art/ music etc...) then you'll need to take that subject at A Level. A core subject (english, maths, science) is a good idea and psychology is also a great choice for future teachers.

Will in your final year of A Levels, you'll be expected to do two things: get some experience volunteering in a primary school (this is on top of your year 10 work experience; most Unis expect two weeks experience at this stage) and pass the teachers' skills test (a basic maths and english test that you can revise for, and book, online.) If you don't pass the skills test you can't apply for teacher training. At this point you will have already have to have passed your GCSEs though, so you should be fine. The English is simple (grammar and punctuation etc...) and the maths relies mostly on basic arithmetic. The hardest thing about it is that each question is timed. Just get lots of practice in and you'll be fine.

Hope this helped
0
reply
ellaswords
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 3 days ago
#3
(Original post by ratatatat)
Hiya, you're right in thinking there are a a few routes into teaching. Your two main pathways are either a Bachelors in Education with QTS, or a PGCE after a suitable degree of your choice. The BaEd is a faster route (three years), and is more teacher-focused as your lectures will cover primary teaching from the get go. The second is longer (a three year degree followed by a PGCE year) and will be less focused on teaching for the first three years. You'll have to fit a lot of learning into that PGCE year, but it gives you more options for the future. You have something to fall back on if the teaching doesn't work out for you. The BaEd will 'ease' you into speaking, so to speak, while the PGCE will get you stuck right in almost straight away. So, it's really a personal choice.

You'll need to start thinking about your GCSEs first; you'll need at least whatever an equivalent to C is (i'm old ) in maths, english and science. After that, you'll want to take A levels that are desirable for trainee teacher applicants. If you want to specialize in a subject (a lot of universities offer a specialism such as english/ maths/ art/ music etc...) then you'll need to take that subject at A Level. A core subject (english, maths, science) is a good idea and psychology is also a great choice for future teachers.

Will in your final year of A Levels, you'll be expected to do two things: get some experience volunteering in a primary school (this is on top of your year 10 work experience; most Unis expect two weeks experience at this stage) and pass the teachers' skills test (a basic maths and english test that you can revise for, and book, online.) If you don't pass the skills test you can't apply for teacher training. At this point you will have already have to have passed your GCSEs though, so you should be fine. The English is simple (grammar and punctuation etc...) and the maths relies mostly on basic arithmetic. The hardest thing about it is that each question is timed. Just get lots of practice in and you'll be fine.

Hope this helped
okay, thank you!
i just have one question about the a levels you recommended. when i was in year9, i went to workshops for certain subjects, including psychology, to see whether i’d like to study them at gcse level. i found psychology itself quite boring & dull, but i liked the idea of sociology & enjoy it a lot, as I took it as a gcse. do you reckon if i took sociology as an alternative for psychology would i be okay? because i’m pretty sure they’re quite similar just sociology focuses on society compared to psychology which focuses on individuals (i think).
0
reply
bwilliams
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#4
Report 3 days ago
#4
(Original post by ellaswords)
okay, thank you!
i just have one question about the a levels you recommended. when i was in year9, i went to workshops for certain subjects, including psychology, to see whether i’d like to study them at gcse level. i found psychology itself quite boring & dull, but i liked the idea of sociology & enjoy it a lot, as I took it as a gcse. do you reckon if i took sociology as an alternative for psychology would i be okay? because i’m pretty sure they’re quite similar just sociology focuses on society compared to psychology which focuses on individuals (i think).
Yes, I think sociology would be much better than psychology. However, it doesn't really matter! Sociology (for most boards) has a compulsory unit on education so would benefit you more. Most importantly, go with what you're most passionate about because your choices won't affect you very much.
0
reply
ratatatat
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#5
Report 3 days ago
#5
(Original post by ellaswords)
okay, thank you!
i just have one question about the a levels you recommended. when i was in year9, i went to workshops for certain subjects, including psychology, to see whether i’d like to study them at gcse level. i found psychology itself quite boring & dull, but i liked the idea of sociology & enjoy it a lot, as I took it as a gcse. do you reckon if i took sociology as an alternative for psychology would i be okay? because i’m pretty sure they’re quite similar just sociology focuses on society compared to psychology which focuses on individuals (i think).
Of course you should take A levels that interest you; it's hard to get a good grade in something you find boring. The reason psychology is desirable is that there is often a unit on child psychology. I studied Piaget, Bruner and Vygotsky at A Level (child psychologists), all of which have since come up on my teaching degree. I didn't take sociology, so I'm not sure if there is a child-specific section, but i'm sure it has it's advantages. The education provided in any part of the world tends to reflect it's surrounding society. A psychology A Level isn't essential, just one suggestion. Find what works for you.
1
reply
ellaswords
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#6
Report Thread starter 3 days ago
#6
(Original post by ratatatat)
Of course you should take A levels that interest you; it's hard to get a good grade in something you find boring. The reason psychology is desirable is that there is often a unit on child psychology. I studied Piaget, Bruner and Vygotsky at A Level (child psychologists), all of which have since come up on my teaching degree. I didn't take sociology, so I'm not sure if there is a child-specific section, but i'm sure it has it's advantages. The education provided in any part of the world tends to reflect it's surrounding society. A psychology A Level isn't essential, just one suggestion. Find what works for you.
thank you for the help!
0
reply
Claudette
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#7
Report 2 days ago
#7
You don’t have to do A levels. I did a BTEC in nursery nursing which is equal to A levels and have the required experience.
Also you won’t have to do the skills tests now as they have been scrapped by each ITT provider will be checking for these skills in their own way.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Are you registered to vote?

18-20 years old (yes) (212)
53.4%
18-20 years old (no) (49)
12.34%
20-25 years old (yes) (63)
15.87%
20-25 years old (no) (9)
2.27%
25-30 years old (yes) (24)
6.05%
25-30 years old (no) (0)
0%
30-40 years old (yes) (22)
5.54%
30-40 years old (no) (3)
0.76%
40+ years old (yes) (8)
2.02%
40+ years old (no) (7)
1.76%

Watched Threads

View All