Is there a recognised qualification in Excel for adults? Watch

MarkPF
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Hello,

I'm currently an Accounting and Finance student in my final year at university, however I've not had much exposure to Excel.

I understand the basics quite well, and I can google a lot of things that I need to know / hear about.

Is there a recognised qualification that I could do to learn advanced Excel such as pivot tables, macros and such?

I would prefer a recognised qualification for future employers to acknowledge the skills.

Thanks,

Mark
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ajj2000
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(Original post by MarkPF)
Hello,

I'm currently an Accounting and Finance student in my final year at university, however I've not had much exposure to Excel.

I understand the basics quite well, and I can google a lot of things that I need to know / hear about.

Is there a recognised qualification that I could do to learn advanced Excel such as pivot tables, macros and such?

I would prefer a recognised qualification for future employers to acknowledge the skills.

Thanks,

Mark
There used to be a pretty lightweight it course only ever looked at for public sector jobs- I’ve not heard of it for a few years now but wouldn’t bother with it anyway.

Other than that there are no large recognised courses which employers would look for or even recognise across any range of industries. Don’t look for credentials - you need demonstrable skills.
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winterscoming
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Microsoft have a couple of certificates, but nothing covered by either of these is particularly difficult to do since it's all covered by the MS Office support docs:
https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/lea...s/exams/mo-200
https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/lea...s/exams/mo-201
All the official documentation for excel functions/formulas/etc is extremely comprehensive and thoroughly well explained for anyone who uses Excel in their job, so the certification seems like a waste of money to me - I can't really imagine employers really being too fussed about these since all they really prove are that you're able to Google for answers, read excel documentation and follow instructions.



There are some free courses which might be worth following for learning to use VBA - this would be the main thing that you can't pick up just by following the Excel docs, since doing anything useful with VBA requires more than just being able to read or copy examples from the Microsoft docs, spending time on this might give you more than you'd get from the certification:
  1. https://www.coursera.org/learn/excel...solving-part-1
  2. https://www.coursera.org/learn/excel...solving-part-2
  3. https://www.coursera.org/learn/excel...art-3-projects
You can use the 'Audit' option when you enrol on these to get access to all the learning material for free - no need to pay for any subscriptions or certificates.
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