My new employers are asking for references!!

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Mikasa_Sa
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#1
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#1
So I just got offered the job of my dreams and have accepted it. Although it is a guaranteed offer, they are now asking for references. The problem now is, my references aren't looking great. I was dismissed from a job in the past (not the previous one) and resigned from my last job after just two weeks. I know I shouldn't lie or misrepresent the reason why I got fired in case they ask my ex-employers, but is there a subtler way to put it on the form instead of 'terminated', 'dismissed' or 'fired'.

What's worse is that during the interview when they briefly asked why I left, I internally panicked and just said that I wanted some change and therefore left. I feel bad for lying but it's too late to do anything about that, but I can't help but worry that they might withdraw the offer now that I put 'fired' on the form.
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Reality Check
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#2
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#2
(Original post by Mikasa_Sa)
So I just got offered the job of my dreams and have accepted it. Although it is a guaranteed offer, they are now asking for references. The problem now is, my references aren't looking great. I was dismissed from a job in the past (not the previous one) and resigned from my last job after just two weeks. I know I shouldn't lie or misrepresent the reason why I got fired in case they ask my ex-employers, but is there a subtler way to put it on the form instead of 'terminated', 'dismissed' or 'fired'.

What's worse is that during the interview when they briefly asked why I left, I internally panicked and just said that I wanted some change and therefore left. I feel bad for lying but it's too late to do anything about that, but I can't help but worry that they might withdraw the offer now that I put 'fired' on the form.
You've been fairly deceitful with your application, haven't you? Why did you leave your last job after just a fortnight? Did you jump before you were pushed? And did you tell this prospective employer that your previous job only lasted a fortnight?

I think once the prospective employer begins to seek references from your previous employers and the extent of it becomes apparent, they will withdraw your job offer. You've clearly misled them, and this is a serious error on your part. There again, they might be lenient. Only they will be able do make this decision, but you've certainly compromised your job offer.

I'm not lecturing you, but there's no point leading you down the garden path.
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threeportdrift
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#3
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#3
(Original post by Mikasa_Sa)
So I just got offered the job of my dreams and have accepted it. Although it is a guaranteed offer, they are now asking for references. The problem now is, my references aren't looking great. I was dismissed from a job in the past (not the previous one) and resigned from my last job after just two weeks. I know I shouldn't lie or misrepresent the reason why I got fired in case they ask my ex-employers, but is there a subtler way to put it on the form instead of 'terminated', 'dismissed' or 'fired'.

What's worse is that during the interview when they briefly asked why I left, I internally panicked and just said that I wanted some change and therefore left. I feel bad for lying but it's too late to do anything about that, but I can't help but worry that they might withdraw the offer now that I put 'fired' on the form.
You've got to consider what the employer is likely to say - so what ishte honest reason - theft, poor timekeeping, rudeness, lack of skill, just didn't get on with the job/people, why did you actively get fired - ie they drove the situation, versus you resigned ie you drove the situation?

'Did not complete probation' is about the gentlest way you can get away with. But if it was a disciplinary issue like theft etc even that is tricky.

Have your new employers actually said who they require the references from? Because if not, ignore all this and use two referees you don't have problems with. There's a good chance, if they are any size of employer, they won't realise that the references aren't from your most recent employer.
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Wired_1800
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#4
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#4
(Original post by Mikasa_Sa)
So I just got offered the job of my dreams and have accepted it. Although it is a guaranteed offer, they are now asking for references. The problem now is, my references aren't looking great. I was dismissed from a job in the past (not the previous one) and resigned from my last job after just two weeks. I know I shouldn't lie or misrepresent the reason why I got fired in case they ask my ex-employers, but is there a subtler way to put it on the form instead of 'terminated', 'dismissed' or 'fired'.

What's worse is that during the interview when they briefly asked why I left, I internally panicked and just said that I wanted some change and therefore left. I feel bad for lying but it's too late to do anything about that, but I can't help but worry that they might withdraw the offer now that I put 'fired' on the form.
This one is tricky. I think you should provide any reference, if they are not particular about which one. If not, be honest with them and provide the past experiences that you had. I doubt your interviewer would remember everything you said during that interview.

If it is optional to provide the references, I’d suggest that you ignore the request.
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Mikasa_Sa
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#5
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#5
(Original post by threeportdrift)
You've got to consider what the employer is likely to say - so what ishte honest reason - theft, poor timekeeping, rudeness, lack of skill, just didn't get on with the job/people, why did you actively get fired - ie they drove the situation, versus you resigned ie you drove the situation?

'Did not complete probation' is about the gentlest way you can get away with. But if it was a disciplinary issue like theft etc even that is tricky.

Have your new employers actually said who they require the references from? Because if not, ignore all this and use two referees you don't have problems with. There's a good chance, if they are any size of employer, they won't realise that the references aren't from your most recent employer.
The reason is none of those that you mentioned, thank God. It was my fault for bringing that part of my work experience up and then when they asked why I left, I was not prepared to answer it instead just rumbled something that came into my mind. I know, I regret it immensely, but if it comes up again I won't have any problem with answering it now.

It's just a general 5 years reference from, I think they care more about with what I have been doing in that period of time, but can't take my chances
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Mikasa_Sa
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#6
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#6
(Original post by Wired_1800)
This one is tricky. I think you should provide any reference, if they are not particular about which one. If not, be honest with them and provide the past experiences that you had. I doubt your interviewer would remember everything you said during that interview.

If it is optional to provide the references, I’d suggest that you ignore the request.
I would need to provide 5 years worth of reference on the form, including education and work. It's not optional, unfortunately.
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Mikasa_Sa
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#7
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#7
(Original post by Reality Check)
You've been fairly deceitful with your application, haven't you? Why did you leave your last job after just a fortnight? Did you jump before you were pushed? And did you tell this prospective employer that your previous job only lasted a fortnight?

I think once the prospective employer begins to seek references from your previous employers and the extent of it becomes apparent, they will withdraw your job offer. You've clearly misled them, and this is a serious error on your part. There again, they might be lenient. Only they will be able do make this decision, but you've certainly compromised your job offer.

I'm not lecturing you, but there's no point leading you down the garden path.
No, I have not been very deceitful like you're making me out to be. I have a really good and understandable reason for why I left my last job after two weeks and yes I have told them that during both stages of the interview and it's clearly on my CV. I know the consequences very well no need to rub it in and I am not about to mislead them now, it was a mistake on my behalf for not being truthful during the interview, but that's because I wasn't expecting them to bring it up. Not helpful at all.
Last edited by Mikasa_Sa; 2 years ago
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threeportdrift
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#8
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#8
(Original post by Mikasa_Sa)
The reason is none of those that you mentioned, thank God. It was my fault for bringing that part of my work experience up and then when they asked why I left, I was not prepared to answer it instead just rumbled something that came into my mind. I know, I regret it immensely, but if it comes up again I won't have any problem with answering it now.

It's just a general 5 years reference from, I think they care more about with what I have been doing in that period of time, but can't take my chances
OK, so you have to put everything down, but if they are also asking for a reason for leaving, always try and word that as neutrally as possible. Useful terms are completed contract, professional development, broadening opportunities, incomplete probation, new opportunity arose, mutual agreement, restructuring, role change, transport difficulties, increased caring responsibilities (now complete) etc
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Mikasa_Sa
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#9
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#9
(Original post by threeportdrift)
OK, so you have to put everything down, but if they are also asking for a reason for leaving, always try and word that as neutrally as possible. Useful terms are completed contract, professional development, broadening opportunities, incomplete probation, new opportunity arose, mutual agreement, restructuring, role change, transport difficulties, increased caring responsibilities (now complete) etc
I really appreciate your help. I feel like if I put anything other than contract dismissed down it will count as misrepresentation.
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threeportdrift
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#10
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#10
(Original post by Mikasa_Sa)
I really appreciate your help. I feel like if I put anything other than contract dismissed down it will count as misrepresentation.
Well, unless I know why you were dismissed, I can't tell whether there is any better way to present it. But 'Did not complete probation' can still reasonably cover dismissal, especially if it happened through the course of a conversation, ie you were called in one day and your manager said Look Mikasa, this really isn't working out, you are too slow and we are going to have to let you go during your probation period'.
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Mikasa_Sa
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#11
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#11
(Original post by threeportdrift)
Well, unless I know why you were dismissed, I can't tell whether there is any better way to present it. But 'Did not complete probation' can still reasonably cover dismissal, especially if it happened through the course of a conversation, ie you were called in one day and your manager said Look Mikasa, this really isn't working out, you are too slow and we are going to have to let you go during your probation period'.
I was dismissed due to personal reasons whcih ended with me having too many sick days. I worked there for a bit over two years, so I was already past the probation period.
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StriderHort
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#12
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#12
(Original post by Wired_1800)
If it is optional to provide the references, I’d suggest that you ignore the request.
I've never heard of an employer request 'optional' references? :confused:
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Wired_1800
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#13
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#13
(Original post by StriderHort)
I've never heard of an employer request 'optional' references? :confused:

I agree with you, but you never know.
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winterscoming
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#14
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#14
It's often the case now that references will simply include the name of where you worked, and your start/end date. Whether your previous employers choose to provide you with a 'bad' reference (i.e. mentioning that you were fired or even mentioning the reason why) is really entirely down the discretion of that employer, although it would be entirely reasonable for them to present the facts.

Your best bet is to stick with those facts and own them, even if you may feel that those facts paint you in a negative light, honesty and a willingness to own your past goes a long way to helping you maintain your professional integrity. If your new employer brings this up with you, then your best course of action is to acknowledge truthfully, avoid making excuses and respond with a minimal, frank appraisal of what happened - If you made mistakes or poor judgement calls, then just admit to that then reassure your new employer that you've learned from the experience, and that you've moved on.

It's important for your new employer to be able to trust you, see you as someone capable of honesty, and as someone who owns their actions and learns from mistakes and negative experiences. As long as they don't see you as being unreliable, dishonest or a potential liability, then there's every chance they'll just be reasonable enough to treat your new job as a clean slate and let you prove your value through your actions and effort in that job.
Last edited by winterscoming; 2 years ago
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Mikasa_Sa
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#15
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#15
(Original post by winterscoming)
It's often the case now that references will simply include the name of where you worked, and your start/end date. Whether your previous employers choose to provide you with a 'bad' reference (i.e. mentioning that you were fired or even mentioning the reason why) is really entirely down the discretion of that employer, although it would be entirely reasonable for them to present the facts.

Your best bet is to stick with those facts and own them, even if you may feel that those facts paint you in a negative light, honesty and a willingness to own your past goes a long way to helping you maintain your professional integrity. If your new employer brings this up with you, then your best course of action is to acknowledge truthfully, avoid making excuses and respond with a minimal, frank appraisal of what happened - If you made mistakes or poor judgement calls, then just admit to that then reassure your new employer that you've learned from the experience, and that you've moved on.

It's important for your new employer to be able to trust you, see you as someone capable of honesty, and as someone who owns their actions and learns from mistakes and negative experiences. As long as they don't see you as being unreliable, dishonest or a potential liability, then there's every chance they'll just be reasonable enough to treat your new job as a clean slate and let you prove your value through your actions and effort in that job.
I agree, there is no way to sugarcoat something like this anyways. The form is now on it’s way back to them, I’m not going to stress over it now. If the worst case scenario happens, I have a second offer with approved references I can alway go back to.
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threeportdrift
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#16
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#16
(Original post by Mikasa_Sa)
I was dismissed due to personal reasons whcih ended with me having too many sick days. I worked there for a bit over two years, so I was already past the probation period.
Then your reason for leaving was - Health issues (now fully resolved)
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ThuggerThugger
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#17
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#17
Any job I’ve left I’ve been brutally honest why and told the interviewer the reason. My last interview I told them my current role is boring. Got the job.. and told the actual manager of the place I was leaving the same reason pretty much.

I have had a reference ask my a previous employer why I was leaving but I didn’t lie in the first instance so had nothing to hide. Tbh I don’t think most ask for essays as to why you left. I dont even think my second to last knows why I left, pretty much said I’m off and goodbye.

Edit: re-read your post and you told a blatant lie, not even one you could wing. You said you left but you were fired lol even if you left voluntarily and gave the employer and prospective employers separate reasons it wouldn’t be as bad but these are two different circumstances entirely. You can either come clean now or take your chances. If you’re on talking terms with the management from the job you got fired from it wouldn’t be a bad idea to get in contact with them ahead of time to see if you can ask them to not mention it if they don’t need to.
Last edited by ThuggerThugger; 2 years ago
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Mikasa_Sa
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#18
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#18
(Original post by ThuggerThugger)
Any job I’ve left I’ve been brutally honest why and told the interviewer the reason. My last interview I told them my current role is boring. Got the job.. and told the actual manager of the place I was leaving the same reason pretty much.

I have had a reference ask my a previous employer why I was leaving but I didn’t lie in the first instance so had nothing to hide. Tbh I don’t think most ask for essays as to why you left. I dont even think my second to last knows why I left, pretty much said I’m off and goodbye.

Edit: re-read your post and you told a blatant lie, not even one you could wing. You said you left but you were fired lol even if you left voluntarily and gave the employer and prospective employers separate reasons it wouldn’t be as bad but these are two different circumstances entirely. You can either come clean now or take your chances. If you’re on talking terms with the management from the job you got fired from it wouldn’t be a bad idea to get in contact with them ahead of time to see if you can ask them to not mention it if they don’t need to.
I know I shouldn’t have lied, but it happened and it’s too late to do anything about that. The “I needed some change” part was true though. Despite being fired, I left with a positive note, so hopefully they can say something positive too.
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ThuggerThugger
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#19
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#19
(Original post by Mikasa_Sa)
I know I shouldn’t have lied, but it happened and it’s too late to do anything about that. The “I needed some change” part was true though. Despite being fired, I left with a positive note, so hopefully they can say something positive too.
Can you get in contact with them? And I thought you had to fill this out on paper as to why you left or did I get that wrong?
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Mikasa_Sa
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#20
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#20
(Original post by ThuggerThugger)
Can you get in contact with them? And I thought you had to fill this out on paper as to why you left or did I get that wrong?
No you are right but there is nothing I can do about what happened during the interview. I have done the paperwork now and they should have it by tomorrow. No there would be no point in contacting them and that was a really long time anyways.
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