P_sear
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I'm in my first year of a physics degree and really struggling with my computational physics course on Python does anybody know of any good books, textbooks or online courses that can help!!
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Joinedup
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(Original post by P_sear)
I'm in my first year of a physics degree and really struggling with my computational physics course on Python does anybody know of any good books, textbooks or online courses that can help!!
If you're struggling with python you might get answers on the coding forum https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/forumdisplay.php?f=119

also if at uni check out the recommended reading/resources for the module.and perhaps speak to a subject librarian
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winterscoming
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Here's some really useful Python links:


I'd also strongly recommend that you install an IDE (development environment/code editor) called PyCharm Community Edition as well -- that's much better than Python's own editor (IDLE). https://www.jetbrains.com/pycharm/download/ -- stuff like the syntax highlighting, error highlighting, mouseover help, autocomplete, etc. is all a lot more human-friendly and intuitive than IDLE.

Another extremely important tip/trick for writing python code when your program is running and not working the way you expect is to be able to use PyCharm's debugger to watch how the program works step-by-step and be able to see exactly what's going on, what the value of variables are, etc. This is very well worth 15 minutes of your time since it could save you hours and a lot of frustration when you end up with mistakes in your logic:
https://www.jetbrains.com/help/pycha...thon-code.html


Also, for some general programming concepts, try some of these (GCSE computer science videos mostly using Python - they're very well explained and cover a lot of the most important fundamentals about how to 'think' like a programmer, so they're relevant to anyone learning the programming basics)
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P_sear
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these links are brilliant thank you! I'll be going through these for sure.
Last edited by P_sear; 1 year ago
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Eimmanuel
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(Original post by P_sear)
I'm in my first year of a physics degree and really struggling with my computational physics course on Python does anybody know of any good books, textbooks or online courses that can help!!

It really depends on what are you struggling with.

You are an absolute beginner on programming, then you might want to at least watch a long video on programming using python.

If you have a problem translating the mathematical expression into code, then it is totally a new problem/issue. I don’t really have a good solution to it. I would recommend that you read up more references. Once you have a certain good amount of exposure to the ways people translate the mathematical expression, you would realize that it is pretty standard.


There are some references that you can look into.

Numerical Methods in Engineering with Python 3 by Jaan Kiusalaas
https://www.cambridge.org/core/books...90FA619FE79F9#
This book focuses on numerical methods rather than python. If you are using python 2 instead, you can look for the older edition which uses python 2.

Programming for Computations – Python by Svein Linge and Hans Petter Langtangen
https://www.springer.com/gp/book/978...=9783319324272
I personally like this book as it is thinner. It strikes a balance in introducing python using physics problems and “teaching “computational” thinking in solving physics problems numerically. Again the code is in python 2. The newer version is in python 3.



There is thicker version by the same author: Hans Petter Langtangen.
A Primer on Scientific Programming with Python.
https://www.springer.com/gp/book/9783662498866
Unfortunately, the author had passed away. So I am not sure whether is there a newer version in future.



Computational Problems for Physics by Rubin H. Landau, Manuel José Páez
https://physics.oregonstate.edu/~lan...ems/index.html
In the above link, you can find lecture videos for the book.

You can find the older edition ebook in the following link. The ebook is free.
https://physics.oregonstate.edu/~lan...ook/index.html
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