AbiAbi_Abi
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I am worried i haven't done enough volunteering...i have done so far: 1 week at a British cancer research shop and through NCS i helped the DASH (disability organisation). I don't have much time left because i want to send my application off before christmas holidays. Is this enough? Has anyone got offers from universities when they haven't done any or little volunteering?
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feebraf196
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Is this for the Msc or undergrad?
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AbiAbi_Abi
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(Original post by feebraf196)
Is this for the Msc or undergrad?
Undergraduate, one of the uni I applied to is an integrated masters.
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AbiAbi_Abi
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Anyone?
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PhoenixFortune
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(Original post by AbiAbi_Abi)
I am worried i haven't done enough volunteering...i have done so far: 1 week at a British cancer research shop and through NCS i helped the DASH (disability organisation). I don't have much time left because i want to send my application off before christmas holidays. Is this enough? Has anyone got offers from universities when they haven't done any or little volunteering?
Ideally you would have more direct work experience with a SLT's potential client groups: the elderly, people with traumatic brain injury, children, children in special schools, stroke survivors, people with degenerative conditions etc. Some work within a clinical setting i.e. a hospital would also be beneficial. Universities know that direct work experience with a SLT is very hard to come by, so they appreciate any effort to make relevant links with potential clients.
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AbiAbi_Abi
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(Original post by PhoenixFortune)
Ideally you would have more direct work experience with a SLT's potential client groups: the elderly, people with traumatic brain injury, children, children in special schools, stroke survivors, people with degenerative conditions etc. Some work within a clinical setting i.e. a hospital would also be beneficial. Universities know that direct work experience with a SLT is very hard to come by, so they appreciate any effort to make relevant links with potential clients.
Oh Okay, Thank you. A few days ago i applied to volunteer at a care home. I know its quite late but hopefully it would be better than doing what i previously did.
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giella
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For undergraduate SLT the amount of work experience and shadowing etc. really doesn’t matter. It’s what you learn from it that matters. No one is expecting the finished article and bear in mind that not even qualified SLTs have spent time with every client group by the time they graduate.

They want to see that you’ve reflected on the importance of communication (and possibly swallowing) to people's lives, that you demonstrate some of the basic competencies that will be the foundation of any healthcare professional’s working life and you demonstrate some if not all of the NHS seven Cs. It’s possible to do all of this through any number of activities that don’t involve direct experience with a potential or actual speech and language therapy client.

If you’re not yet 18, there’s not that much you would realistically be expected to have done and bear in mind also that healthcare courses expect you to be responsible with your work experience and adhere to regulations around volunteers such as DBSs where required.

Volunteering isn’t in itself a requirement to gain entry to an SLT course. I know plenty of people who got on the course without it and who went on to get their first jobs in SLT without it. If it were, certain groups of people would be profoundly disadvantaged. Admissions teams for undergraduate level, as I said, are more interested that people can demonstrate potential, that they have awareness of the role SLTs play in health and education, and that they are emotionally and intellectually suited for the job. Working for free and donating time is not an essential requirement. It’s just one way of demonstrating the qualities and knowledge expected of a potential undergraduate in SLT.

It’s not to say you can’t make those connections with potential client groups but you don’t have to bend over backwards to do it. Approach your school or college SENDCO. They’ll probably find something you can do with precisely the people SLTs work with. Or maybe raise awareness of SLCN, your own included, through a sponsored activity such as eating nothing but blended meals for a week, or drinking only thickened drinks that other people have to make you, a sponsored silence, or writing only with your left hand and reflect the hell out of the experience. They’re certainly ways of increasing your empathy for people left with no choice but to do any of the above. Read, read, read and watch as well. Google Edwyn Collins and the documentary and book written about him. Follow Sarah Scott’s channel on YouTube (both stroke survivors by the way). Google Nick Robinson and his experience with voice therapy.

Much of this is within your grasp. You don’t have to stretch too far or too much to get what you need.
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AbiAbi_Abi
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(Original post by giella)
For undergraduate SLT the amount of work experience and shadowing etc. really doesn’t matter. It’s what you learn from it that matters. No one is expecting the finished article and bear in mind that not even qualified SLTs have spent time with every client group by the time they graduate.

They want to see that you’ve reflected on the importance of communication (and possibly swallowing) to people's lives, that you demonstrate some of the basic competencies that will be the foundation of any healthcare professional’s working life and you demonstrate some if not all of the NHS seven Cs. It’s possible to do all of this through any number of activities that don’t involve direct experience with a potential or actual speech and language therapy client.

If you’re not yet 18, there’s not that much you would realistically be expected to have done and bear in mind also that healthcare courses expect you to be responsible with your work experience and adhere to regulations around volunteers such as DBSs where required.

Volunteering isn’t in itself a requirement to gain entry to an SLT course. I know plenty of people who got on the course without it and who went on to get their first jobs in SLT without it. If it were, certain groups of people would be profoundly disadvantaged. Admissions teams for undergraduate level, as I said, are more interested that people can demonstrate potential, that they have awareness of the role SLTs play in health and education, and that they are emotionally and intellectually suited for the job. Working for free and donating time is not an essential requirement. It’s just one way of demonstrating the qualities and knowledge expected of a potential undergraduate in SLT.

It’s not to say you can’t make those connections with potential client groups but you don’t have to bend over backwards to do it. Approach your school or college SENDCO. They’ll probably find something you can do with precisely the people SLTs work with. Or maybe raise awareness of SLCN, your own included, through a sponsored activity such as eating nothing but blended meals for a week, or drinking only thickened drinks that other people have to make you, a sponsored silence, or writing only with your left hand and reflect the hell out of the experience. They’re certainly ways of increasing your empathy for people left with no choice but to do any of the above. Read, read, read and watch as well. Google Edwyn Collins and the documentary and book written about him. Follow Sarah Scott’s channel on YouTube (both stroke survivors by the way). Google Nick Robinson and his experience with voice therapy.

Much of this is within your grasp. You don’t have to stretch too far or too much to get what you need.
Thank you so much for your help and advice. If I’m not able to do a sponsored activity can I do the left hand writing or drinking liquid food etc by myself and write about it? What would be the name of that? I appreciate your help thank you again x
Last edited by AbiAbi_Abi; 3 weeks ago
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giella
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I would advise you do it because then you can evidence it and you can say you raised awareness as well as money for charity. Alternatively, you could blog about it and raise awareness that way.
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AbiAbi_Abi
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Oh okay thank you, I have also taken part in NCS and volunteered with an organisation called dash where we Raised money for people with disabilities through a long walk and other activities, is this sponsored activity? can I include this even though I did this through NCS?
(Original post by giella)
I would advise you do it because then you can evidence it and you can say you raised awareness as well as money for charity. Alternatively, you could blog about it and raise awareness that way.
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