sb246
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Hi there!

I am currently in my fourth year of secondary school in Ireland but I'm considering applying to either Oxbridge or an Ivy League School. Btw I know that medicine in the US is actually a graduate course Image I'm passionate about medicine and in the future, I'd like to work in the country I studied in.

I'm curious about people's opinions and thoughts of the pros and cons of studying medicine in each country and also, the job opportunities after graduating. In addition, are there any major differences between the healthcare systems or the salaries in the UK and US? Would it be possible to study medicine in the UK and move to the US to practice? Overall, which country do you think is best for studying medicine? If you have any personal experience, please mention that as well. Much appreciated!
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AfricanDream
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(Original post by sb246)
Hi there!

I am currently in my fourth year of secondary school in Ireland but I'm considering applying to either Oxbridge or an Ivy League School. Btw I know that medicine in the US is actually a graduate course Image I'm passionate about medicine and in the future, I'd like to work in the country I studied in.

I'm curious about people's opinions and thoughts of the pros and cons of studying medicine in each country and also, the job opportunities after graduating. In addition, are there any major differences between the healthcare systems or the salaries in the UK and US? Would it be possible to study medicine in the UK and move to the US to practice? Overall, which country do you think is best for studying medicine? If you have any personal experience, please mention that as well. Much appreciated!
Hi,

I am originally from South Africa (I was thinking about going to study medicine in the US while living in South Africa) but moved to the UK in high school and now live in Scotland(current medical applicant in Scotland applied to Glasgow and Edinburgh) and was told that it made a lot more sense to apply to study medicine in the UK than the US, given that you do a course that is pre-med( medically relevant, e.g. science) and then medicine in the US. I don't think there will be a problem getting a job either way as doctors are always in demand, following your degree, different specialisation programs might be more competitive to get on to (it probably depends on the speciality that you would be looking at).

UK- 5-6 years undergraduate medicine to achieve degree( 6 years= medicine with intercalated science degree)-You are a doctor at this point, then 2 years( foundation programme years FY1 and FY2), then it depends on what you want to specialise in, core specialty training ( around 2 years, sometimes 3 while e.g. clinical radiology requires no core training and only FY1 and 2 and then 5 years training), then specialist training (between 4 and 9 years)to become a consultant. So 5-6 years medical school, the 7 to 13 years training afterwards before you can become a consultant.

USA( what I briefly found online, not sure how accurate this is)-It takes 11-14 years to become a doctor in the United States, including earning a bachelor's degree, attending 4 years of medical school, and completing a 3- to 7-year residency program after medical school. After residency, doctors may apply for a state license to practice medicine.

It might be difficult to move to the US to practice with a British Medical degree, I briefly looked into it at one point and from what I saw( brief search) it looked like quite a difficult process.

The medic portal has some information on studying in the US: https://www.themedicportal.com/appli...ne-in-the-usa/

Here are some links to look at that may help:

https://www.bma.org.uk/advice/career...ing-abroad/usa
https://www.medinc.co.uk/uk-doctors-...icult-process/

If anything, couldn't you apply to both as British Universities use UCAS to submit application while american universities use a different system. I would look up online to see if you can find more information and maybe contact the US universities to clarify what qualifications you will need (e.g.sitting the SATS), what it would cost to study a science as an international student( possible scholarship?), then medicine process,e.g. application, tests, fees, visa,etc.

In the UK obviously most healthcare is in the NHS, some private. While in America the care is mostly private, with some public health( seems complex and confusing on brief glance).

For me personally I would choose the UK, and then if anything look into potentially working in the US later( might be difficult but not impossible).
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