I really struggle with English language help!

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username3255500
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#1
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I need to resit English language, I am doing my A-levels and I need a 6 in GCSE English language for most universities and I got a 5. I am more of a maths/science person and English doesn't come naturally. I have used BBC bitesize to help me, I have learnt about themes, techniques etc. But, it's tackling the questions in the exam, how to write the answer. How do i plan? Is there a method to answering a question e.g PEEL? In my mocks I got a 5 in paper 1 and a 6 in paper 2, I want to be getting 7's so that when I sit the exam I know I'm not going to either just get a 6 or just miss a 6, I want to feel confident. Any help would be appreciated.
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Alayna1234
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Vinny C
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A level? They don't want good English... they want literature analysis. Give them a pluperfect and a subjunctive... and tell them even Shakespeare would have got those wrong!
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Tolgash
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(Original post by Vinny C)
A level? They don't want good English... they want literature analysis. Give them a pluperfect and a subjunctive... and tell them even Shakespeare would have got those wrong!
Knowing the metalanguage of grammar doesn't necessarily mean you are ‘good’ at English. The terms you mention are probably more suited to classes that have English taught as a foreign language. I would rather have someone who was able to write literary masterpieces or craft a brilliantly persuasive speech.

Also, have you seen an English language paper at A Level? Verb moods and all the tenses are the least of our problems!
Last edited by Tolgash; 2 years ago
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Vinny C
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(Original post by Tolgarda)
Knowing the metalanguage of grammar doesn't necessarily mean you are ‘good’ at English. The terms you mention are probably more suited to classes that have English taught as a foreign language. I would rather have someone who was able to write literary masterpieces or craft a brilliantly persuasive speech.

Also, have you seen an English language paper at A Level? Verb moods and all the tenses are the least of our problems!
It was taught to me by the rulebook... not as natives learn it. What did you bring that book up for that I don't like to be read to from out of up for? Our task... reconstruct this into good English. Never finish a sentence with a preposition!
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Tolgash
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(Original post by Vinny C)
It was taught to me by the rulebook... not as natives learn it. What did you bring that book up for that I don't like to be read to from out of up for? Our task... reconstruct this into good English. Never finish a sentence with a preposition!
Actually, that's a Latin rule. There is no single official rulebook in English that I know which states that a sentence cannot with a preposition. That is merely a matter of style. This ‘rule’ is a factoid. You sound like a prescriptivist, and I mean the kind that Jean Aitchison wrote about.

English took a lot from Latin, but not necessarily all of its grammatical rules. Are you Jonathan Swift or something?

Do you believe in linguistic declinism?
Last edited by Tolgash; 2 years ago
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Vinny C
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(Original post by Tolgarda)
Actually, that's a Latin rule. There is no single official rulebook in English that I know which states that a sentence cannot with a preposition. That is merely a matter of style. This ‘rule’ is a factoid. You sound like a prescriptivist, and I mean the kind that Jean Aitchison wrote about.

English took a lot from Latin, but not necessarily all of its grammatical rules. Are you Jonathan Swift or something?
It took a lot from everything. Latin, French, German and Scandinavian. That makes it very rich but so very difficult to get right. I await your reconstruction... I had to break it into two sentences.
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mxo.
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mr bruff on YouTube is all you’ll need
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