Your vote matters – keep updated with the basics and ask us *almost* anything!

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CatusStarbright
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#21
Report 2 years ago
#21
(Original post by Official House of Commons)
CatusStarbright Sure: Your mother must go to your polling station to cast your vote. She will receive a proxy poll card telling her where and when to cast your vote for you. At the polling station she'll just show the card and state that she's voting on your behalf.

Do you know whether she's received the proxy poll card yet? If she hasn't got it by the end of the week she could contact your local electoral services team. Their contact details can be found here.

There's more guidance on the Electoral Commission's proxy voting page. Hope that helps but let us know if you need any further info
I don't think she has yet but I'll ask and pass on your information. Thank you.
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Official House of Commons
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#22
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#22
What happens to the House of Lords in a general election?

Can they vote for candidates to represent them in the House of Commons?

A couple of videos you might find interesting:


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Official House of Commons
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#23
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#23
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You vote for a candidate to be your MP. They represent your constituency in the House of Commons.

To see the candidates in your constituency and the manifestos of their parties, enter your postcode into whocanivotefor.co.uk.
Last edited by Official House of Commons; 2 years ago
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Official House of Commons
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#24
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#24
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Just two days to go! :shock:

You must vote at your assigned polling station (if you have not applied for a proxy or postal vote).

Polling stations are open from 7am to 10pm on 12 December. Enter your postcode at wheredoivote.co.uk to find yours.
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Official House of Commons
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#25
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#25
Safe seats and marginal seats - what are they?



Does my vote really matter if I'm in a safe seat?

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Official House of Commons
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#26
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#26
:eek3:Tomorrow is the big day!:dance:

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Some key facts:

  • Polling stations open 7am – 10pm
  • If you are in the queue at 10pm then you are entitled to vote
  • Only voters in Northern Ireland need ID. In England, Scotland and Wales you don't need a polling card nor identification - just bring yourself!
  • If you haven't sent off your postal vote you can hand it in at the polling station and vote in person
  • You can get an emergency proxy if you're ill
  • Everything else you might need to know about casting your vote tomorrow can be found on the Electoral Commission's Get ready for polling day webpage.
Last edited by Official House of Commons; 2 years ago
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Fullofsurprises
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#27
Report 2 years ago
#27
(Original post by Official House of Commons)
:eek3:Tomorrow is the big day!:dance:

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Some key facts:
  • If you are in the queue at 10pm then you are entitled to vote
Be warned that this is not always rigidly followed at all polling stations. At the last couple of general elections, people queuing were turned away after 10pm. Please do not miss your chance to vote - vote before 9.30pm!
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CoolCavy
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#28
Report 1 year ago
#28
Couldnt really find an appropriate place to post this apart from here and it didnt seem worth making an entirely new thread for it.

I am just hoping someone can explain how local elections work, i've never voted in a local election (only voted in general ones) and i expected it to work the same i.e you look up the manifestos of people in your area but all i've managed to find is the list of who is running with their house address and political party but not what they actually stand for?
Are we expected to vote based on what party they are in i.e what the labour/lib dems/cons stand for in general? This seems a bit silly as regional issues arent going to be detailed in a general election manifesto.
Apparently we have to vote for a police officer as well? At the moment im leaning to just not voting as i would sooner not vote than just vote blindly without being properly informed.

Tagging the regular DandCA crew who can maybe shed some light

Wired_1800 harrysbar 04MR17 Fullofsurprises
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04MR17
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#29
Report 1 year ago
#29
(Original post by CoolCavy)
Couldnt really find an appropriate place to post this apart from here and it didnt seem worth making an entirely new thread for it.

I am just hoping someone can explain how local elections work, i've never voted in a local election (only voted in general ones) and i expected it to work the same i.e you look up the manifestos of people in your area but all i've managed to find is the list of who is running with their house address and political party but not what they actually stand for?
Are we expected to vote based on what party they are in i.e what the labour/lib dems/cons stand for in general? This seems a bit silly as regional issues arent going to be detailed in a general election manifesto.
Apparently we have to vote for a police officer as well? At the moment im leaning to just not voting as i would sooner not vote than just vote blindly without being properly informed.

Tagging the regular DandCA crew who can maybe shed some light

Wired_1800 harrysbar 04MR17 Fullofsurprises
I think Saracen's Fez is probably more knowledgeable on this than I.

The Police and Crime Commissioner is the person who oversees all the police forces in the area and implements any changes they stand for. E.g. "more money for counter terror" or "more PCSOs" or something like that.

The local cllrs will be standing to help decide the council budgets. So how much money will be spent on youth centres or whether or not to close a local park. Cycle lanes, bus lanes, this sort of thing. You might be able to find information on each party's local social media pages?
So if you look at "Norwich Labour Party" on facebook or twitter; or try "Exeter Conservatives" you'll find some of their campaign materials about their local priorities there. I just picked two random examples of places because I know you wouldn't want to share info about your location.
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Saracen's Fez
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#30
Report 1 year ago
#30
(Original post by CoolCavy)
Couldnt really find an appropriate place to post this apart from here and it didnt seem worth making an entirely new thread for it.

I am just hoping someone can explain how local elections work, i've never voted in a local election (only voted in general ones) and i expected it to work the same i.e you look up the manifestos of people in your area but all i've managed to find is the list of who is running with their house address and political party but not what they actually stand for?
Are we expected to vote based on what party they are in i.e what the labour/lib dems/cons stand for in general? This seems a bit silly as regional issues arent going to be detailed in a general election manifesto.
Apparently we have to vote for a police officer as well? At the moment im leaning to just not voting as i would sooner not vote than just vote blindly without being properly informed.

Tagging the regular DandCA crew who can maybe shed some light

Wired_1800 harrysbar 04MR17 Fullofsurprises
(Original post by 04MR17)
I think Saracen's Fez is probably more knowledgeable on this than I.

The Police and Crime Commissioner is the person who oversees all the police forces in the area and implements any changes they stand for. E.g. "more money for counter terror" or "more PCSOs" or something like that.

The local cllrs will be standing to help decide the council budgets. So how much money will be spent on youth centres or whether or not to close a local park. Cycle lanes, bus lanes, this sort of thing. You might be able to find information on each party's local social media pages?
So if you look at "Norwich Labour Party" on facebook or twitter; or try "Exeter Conservatives" you'll find some of their campaign materials about their local priorities there. I just picked two random examples of places because I know you wouldn't want to share info about your location.
In terms of councillors, it's often hard to tell what an individual candidate is like, unless they come and canvass you or send a leaflet. With incumbent councillors you can probably google their name and find stuff out about what they've been up to. When you know your local candidates' names you might also want to look at their own social media to see what they've been focusing on. I think most people end up voting on national party lines though. (Well, actually, most people don't vote at all, because local election turnout is typically below 50%).

The police commissioner has responsibilities covering the broader operational decisions and policies of the police force, but they don't influence the day-to-day policing decisions, which are made by the (unelected) chief constable. So for example our PCC has introduced more CCTV around the police force area, among other things, and our neighbouring PCC has explored drug consumption rooms. Again party is less relevant here – but people will mostly still vote for the party they support nationally.
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Saracen's Fez
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#31
Report 1 year ago
#31
This is a good thread to resurrect or create afresh as well for next Thursday imo.
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Wired_1800
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#32
Report 1 year ago
#32
(Original post by CoolCavy)
Couldnt really find an appropriate place to post this apart from here and it didnt seem worth making an entirely new thread for it.

I am just hoping someone can explain how local elections work, i've never voted in a local election (only voted in general ones) and i expected it to work the same i.e you look up the manifestos of people in your area but all i've managed to find is the list of who is running with their house address and political party but not what they actually stand for?
Are we expected to vote based on what party they are in i.e what the labour/lib dems/cons stand for in general? This seems a bit silly as regional issues arent going to be detailed in a general election manifesto.
Apparently we have to vote for a police officer as well? At the moment im leaning to just not voting as i would sooner not vote than just vote blindly without being properly informed.

Tagging the regular DandCA crew who can maybe shed some light

Wired_1800 harrysbar 04MR17 Fullofsurprises
Hello.

First, it is key to check that you are registered to vote and can do so whether via the post, by proxy or in-person. Once that is sorted then you decide who to actually vote for in May.

In England, elections will be held for Mayors, local Councils, London Assembly members and Police and Crime Commissioners. There is an MP by-election for Hartlepool.

Voting in local elections has a similar approach to the general one where you select your choice of candidate. In certain cases such as for Mayors & police and crime commissioners, you can select two preferences.

The BBC has a decent breakdown of the local elections on the website. You can refer to the information here:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-56286643

Feel free to look up your local area to find out what matters to you. You can search for your postcode in the section “Who can I vote for in my area?” and find further information.

Please when you do vote, don't rely on the vaccination success to cloud your judgement on political parties. Consider your local issues and what really matters to you. Are you better off with the current status quo of sleaze, dodgy dealings & incompetence or is it time for real change? Your choice will determine your real experience locally and one wouldn't be able to blame anyone but themselves.

Good luck
Last edited by Wired_1800; 1 year ago
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Fullofsurprises
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#33
Report 1 year ago
#33
(Original post by Saracen's Fez)
This is a good thread to resurrect or create afresh as well for next Thursday imo.
Shall we just carry on?
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Fullofsurprises
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#34
Report 1 year ago
#34
(Original post by CoolCavy)
Couldnt really find an appropriate place to post this apart from here and it didnt seem worth making an entirely new thread for it.

I am just hoping someone can explain how local elections work, i've never voted in a local election (only voted in general ones) and i expected it to work the same i.e you look up the manifestos of people in your area but all i've managed to find is the list of who is running with their house address and political party but not what they actually stand for?
Are we expected to vote based on what party they are in i.e what the labour/lib dems/cons stand for in general? This seems a bit silly as regional issues arent going to be detailed in a general election manifesto.
Apparently we have to vote for a police officer as well? At the moment im leaning to just not voting as i would sooner not vote than just vote blindly without being properly informed.

Tagging the regular DandCA crew who can maybe shed some light

Wired_1800 harrysbar 04MR17 Fullofsurprises
One thing to check is what the options are for your area. Local election slates vary quite a bit from place to place - for example, not all areas have local councillors or all councillors up for re-election each year. People who live in cities or regions that have elected Mayors (London, Bristol, West Midlands, Manchester and a few others) will have that on their ballots. Some of the elected Mayors (especially London) have quite a lot of powers and are important and influential - the Mayors of London and Manchester in particular have become or already were national figures. You can find out who is standing in your area. Google the local authority and the word 'elections' for your area and their website will tell you about which seats and bodies have elections. Another possibility is that you are in Scotland or Wales, where they have elections to their national parliaments as well.
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Saracen's Fez
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#35
Report 1 year ago
#35
(Original post by Fullofsurprises)
One thing to check is what the options are for your area. Local election slates vary quite a bit from place to place - for example, not all areas have local councillors or all councillors up for re-election each year. People who live in cities or regions that have elected Mayors (London, Bristol, West Midlands, Manchester and a few others) will have that on their ballots. Some of the elected Mayors (especially London) have quite a lot of powers and are important and influential - the Mayors of London and Manchester in particular have become or already were national figures. You can find out who is standing in your area. Google the local authority and the word 'elections' for your area and their website will tell you about which seats and bodies have elections. Another possibility is that you are in Scotland or Wales, where they have elections to their national parliaments as well.
This website is a useful tool for this:
https://www.electoralcommission.org....on-information
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