Saira.Z
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I'm doing 8 GCSE subjects and I'm in year 11. I'm literally in the middle of my first set of mocks this year and I've been studying/revising for at least 5 hours a day since the start of year 10.
My overall predicted grade target (from SATS results) is a 7 but I've been aiming for 8's and 9's in most subjects.

Last year in my mocks I got:
Maths - 5 (I completely messed up the non-calculator paper)
English Lit - 7 (I dropped from a 9)
History - 8
Spanish - 5
Music - 9
Drama - 8
Science - 5

This year I've dropped in History by 4 grades (I think because I managed to ask my teacher before we get our results) because I got all of my exam technique wrong despite knowing all of the subject matter. With science, I thought the papers were accessible but I couldn't recollect any information from my head in my exam; for Maths - the first paper was alright but on the second I literally cried because I couldn't do it; English, Drama and Music have been alright but I need to improve...

But honestly, I've studied so much but I'm not getting 9's yet and I'm far from it. It's high standards I've set for myself but I'm literally working so hard I don't know what's going so wrong.

I barely have 7 months before my real GCSE's and I can't even remember anything for English Lit (we only did an exam for Language). I was making notes and then I've only just started to make flashcards. But I'm genuinely upset because people are getting the same grades as me with not even half of the effort I've put in. My teachers have predicted me 9's but for some reason I feel like I've dropped in 3 subjects.

And I think I've been over-studying because in my History exam for example, I think my issue was that I was just spewing out facts I had memorised rather than actually addressing the question? Same with English Lit. But it seems that if I go home and work on a topic some more, I'll be more likely to forget it than if I just learn it at school - this is true for Maths. I just can't remember how to do certain Maths topics at all and yet my teacher thinks I'm capable of doing A-level maths.

Help me plz lol
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natalie1441
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It depends on what revision you are doing. It's all well and good writing and reading over notes, but if you have no practice in exam technique, including writing under time pressure, you won't achieve your full academic potential. I made this mistake and believe me, you feel much more confident going into an exam knowing the structure of the questions and how you need to structure your answers.
Don't spend all of your time revising though, it's important to have some free time so you don't get stressed and over-work yourself. For GCSEs, I started revising 3 months before my first exam, doing an hour or two a day just to get into the swing of it, then slowly kept increasing how much revision I was doing to around 3 hours after school every day and 5-6 hours on weekends, but still having the occasional day off, and making sure I had breaks in my revision (i.e 30 minutes of studying and 20 minutes break), and this method definitely paid off in the end.
But obviously it's up to the individual; everyone works differently and finds different methods of revision more beneficial than others. So I'd say try different methods of revising (e.g taking notes, watching documentaries, listening to GCSEpods, making mind maps, diagrams etc) to find which works best, and do exam-style questions as part of your revision so you're 100% prepared.
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Saira.Z
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(Original post by natalie1441)
It depends on what revision you are doing. It's all well and good writing and reading over notes, but if you have no practice in exam technique, including writing under time pressure, you won't achieve your full academic potential. I made this mistake and believe me, you feel much more confident going into an exam knowing the structure of the questions and how you need to structure your answers.
Don't spend all of your time revising though, it's important to have some free time so you don't get stressed and over-work yourself. For GCSEs, I started revising 3 months before my first exam, doing an hour or two a day just to get into the swing of it, then slowly kept increasing how much revision I was doing to around 3 hours after school every day and 5-6 hours on weekends, but still having the occasional day off, and making sure I had breaks in my revision (i.e 30 minutes of studying and 20 minutes break), and this method definitely paid off in the end.
But obviously it's up to the individual; everyone works differently and finds different methods of revision more beneficial than others. So I'd say try different methods of revising (e.g taking notes, watching documentaries, listening to GCSEpods, making mind maps, diagrams etc) to find which works best, and do exam-style questions as part of your revision so you're 100% prepared.
Yeah I think I've been overdoing it so much that there's just a huge cloud of random, unorganised information in my head. And I'm definitely struggling to maintain the resilience required to be able to make it through an entire paper without forgetting everything due to panic. But I think I'll try to do less revision and see if I can manage to be more efficient.
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