lucy295
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Is the study of brain damage and it’s impacts on people people neurology or psychology or something completely different? If it is more psychology would it be wise do do it as an a-level or is it okay not to specialise too much so early?
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ecolier
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(Original post by lucy295)
Is the study of brain damage and it’s impacts on people people neurology or psychology or something completely different? If it is more psychology would it be wise do do it as an a-level or is it okay not to specialise too much so early?
As I have said on the other thread, neurology is a medical specialty and it will take you > 10 years from now just to even start training in it - so it's definitely premature to think about that. Just to reiterate, as a medical specialty you'd probably want to do rehabilitation medicine, that's the specialty looking after patients with brain damage (amongst other things).

If you find psychology interesting, by all means do that A-Level. Here is the thread over in the Medicine forum where the A-Level subjects for Medicine is discussed: https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=5611422
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username5025618
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Hello, the study of brain damage is related more so to neurology, If you’d like to study neurology than it focuses on neurotransmitters and chemical imbalances which can affect human behaviour and mental health. I think if you have an ambition for psychology then 100% do the a-levels. The great thing about studying psychology, even at university level, is the fact you can find out what area you’d like to specialise in later on. It’s such a flexible degree, hope this helps
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ecolier
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(Original post by ethand08)
Hello, the study of brain damage is related more so to neurology, If you’d like to study neurology than it focuses on neurotransmitters and chemical imbalances which can affect human behaviour and mental health....
I think you have got neurology and neuroscience confused there.

I work in neurology (as a junior doctor), we don't really study brain damage per se. We manage patients with brain and nerve disorders.
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A Rolling Stone
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(Original post by lucy295)
Is the study of brain damage and it’s impacts on people people neurology or psychology or something completely different? If it is more psychology would it be wise do do it as an a-level or is it okay not to specialise too much so early?
neither. i'd say it comes under medicine closer than anything else.
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username5025618
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(Original post by ecolier)
I think you have got neurology and neuroscience confused there.

I work in neurology (as a junior doctor), we don't really study brain damage per se. We manage patients with brain and nerve disorders.

I agree with what you say. Contrary to this, I would say it depends on which specific area one might decide to go in, whether in a clinical setting or mental health facilities which focuses more on the psychological aspects rather than laboratory settings.
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ecolier
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(Original post by ethand08)
...Contrary to this, I would say it depends on which specific area one might decide to go in, whether in a clinical setting or mental health facilities which focuses more on the psychological aspects rather than laboratory settings.
Sure, but neurology (as a clinical specialty) is purely clinical and none of the sub-specialties of neurology really deals with brain damage as such.

If OP wanted to persue medicine as a career, they will have plenty of time to decide - 5 / 6 years undergrad course, 2 years foundation and then 3 years internal medicine training. As I have said rehabilitation medicine deals with more patients with brain damage; alternatively psychiatry (also a medical specialty, not psychology) may also have such cases.

https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/exp...cine/neurology

Many neurologists develop sub-specialty interests such as:
  • epilepsy
  • headache
  • stroke and cerebrovascular (affecting circulation of blood to the brain) medicine
  • multiple sclerosis (a progressive disease of the central nervous system ) and inflammatory diseases
  • movement disorders
  • neuromuscular disorders
  • cognitive neurology (includes attention, memory and decision-making)
  • sleep medicine
  • pain management
Last edited by ecolier; 1 year ago
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