Why is mechanics the only math topic I can’t do? Watch

Eri Brace
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I can’t work out why I am so bad at mechanics and physics.
I am aiming for A*A*A* in maths, further maths and physics but I feel like mechanics is gonna screw me.
Pure maths comes so easily to me but for some reason when I try mechanics it’s impossible
How can I combat this?
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GreenCub
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The Mechanics topics require a different way of thinking to the pure maths topics. Usually the actual mathematical content in mechanics isn't very complicated, but the difficulty is in understanding how all the information you're given fits together and knowing what quantities you need to find in order to solve the problem. Practice is probably the best way to improve - it's important to make a serious attempt at a problem (even if you get stuck) before looking at any solutions.
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MarkFromWales
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It's probably not the only maths topic you can't do. It's just that you haven't discovered the others yet.
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AlishaWhite
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Start with basic questions then go more advanced. Do that for each topic in mechanics.
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kkboyk
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I was the same, it comes down to personal preferences. Your best bet is to work harder in mechanics, attempting to do questions on a regular basis and getting feedback from it. Its doable but will require you to work hard. Don't waste time making or reading notes, Maths isn't a spectator sports.
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the bear
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boys tend to find mechanics more accessible than girls. it may be because from an early age they are encouraged to engage physically with the world around them, to understand what makes things work, to take things apart and put them back together again. the rough physicality of male children and their fascination with bicycles, cars & weapons all helps the young chap to feel at home with mechanics.
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mnot
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(Original post by Eri Brace)
I can’t work out why I am so bad at mechanics and physics.
I am aiming for A*A*A* in maths, further maths and physics but I feel like mechanics is gonna screw me.
Pure maths comes so easily to me but for some reason when I try mechanics it’s impossible
How can I combat this?
Im surprised you find the calculus & induction etc in further math easier than mechanics, somethings not right there.

Mechanics (at a-level) is pretty basic rules and with some practice should be easy. If you are doing further pure then mechanics should be a walk, maybe just make sure you drill the fundamentals again.

Do you actually think stuff like De Moivres theorem is easier than F=ma
Last edited by mnot; 3 weeks ago
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kkboyk
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(Original post by mnot)
Im surprised you find the calculus & induction etc in further math easier than mechanics, somethings not right there.

Mechanics (at a-level) is pretty basic rules and with some practice should be easy. If you can not out further pure mechanics should be a walk, maybe just make sure you drill the fundamentals again.

Do you actually think stuff like De Moivres theorem is easier than F=ma
OP is probably a lot more interest in the pure side. I found de moivres theorem easier than M3 and M2, mostly because I struggled to understand the long wording of mechanics and didnt have much knack for physics . It's quite common at uni tbh, In my degree I saw a lot of people struggling more in classical mechanics than on the more pure modules like real analysis and abstract algebra.
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Danny_Man
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(Original post by kkboyk)
I was the same, it comes down to personal preferences. Your best bet is to work harder in mechanics, attempting to do questions on a regular basis and getting feedback from it. Its doable but will require you to work hard. Don't waste time making or given fits together and knowing what quantities you need to find in order to solve the problem. Practice is probably the best way to improve - it's important to make a serious attempt at a problem (even if you get stuck) before looking at any solutions.
Don't make notes? I completely disagree. In fact, by writing down and explaining to yourself (in your own words) for example, how to solve a certain problem, not only does it increase the understanding of the topic, but you're also more likely to remember it.
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kkboyk
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(Original post by Danny_Man)
Don't make notes? I completely disagree. In fact, by writing down and explaining to yourself (in your own words) for example, how to solve a certain problem, not only does it increase the understanding of the topic, but you're also more likely to remember it.
The problem is here is that students who often tend to do this get way too engrossed in making notes and don't end up practicing enough (they often struggle far more with unexpected exam questions), hence don't get the top grades. A-level Maths is far more about practice than anything, especially due to its repetition with exam questions. Because of this, getting an A doesn't require you to have a strong understanding of the subject, but rather your exam techniques. It shouldn't be studied the same way as other subjects. I learnt this the hard way during year 12 as I followed exactly what you said, only to find out that the rest of my mates doing it got higher grades than me whilst spending half the amount of time I revise and barely understanding the topics. You will remember and understand everything by doing actual Maths, not rewriting notes.

Compared to other subjects, Maths has the most resources online. There are far more better alternative than rewriting notes, for example exam solutions which talks through each modules in a short, simple and concise manner and also teaches you how to answer questions with hints and tips. After this its better to get a practice booklet full of questions in physics and maths tutor, working your way through whilst checking your answers and having teachers answer any question you have. This is simply what the top Maths students do.
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Danny_Man
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(Original post by kkboyk)
The problem is here is that students who often tend to do this get way too engrossed in making notes and don't end up practicing enough (they often struggle far more with unexpected exam questions), hence don't get the top grades. A-level Maths is far more about practice than anything, especially due to its repetition with exam questions. Because of this, getting an A doesn't require you to have a strong understanding of the subject, but rather your exam techniques. It shouldn't be studied the same way as other subjects. I learnt this the hard way during year 12 as I followed exactly what you said, only to find out that the rest of my mates doing it got higher grades than me whilst spending half the amount of time I revise and barely understanding the topics. You will remember and understand everything by doing actual Maths, not rewriting notes.

Compared to other subjects, Maths has the most resources online. There are far more better alternative than rewriting notes, for example exam solutions which talks through each modules in a short, simple and concise manner and also teaches you how to answer questions with hints and tips. After this its better to get a practice booklet full of questions in physics and maths tutor, working your way through whilst checking your answers and having teachers answer any question you have. This is simply what the top Maths students do.
Just to clarify, I'm not talking about the method where you rewrite over and over again (that is indeed very ineffective), this is more of a "talking to yourself" type of method. When I use this method, I never have to write about the same topic more than once. It doesn't take long either.
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Eri Brace
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(Original post by mnot)
Im surprised you find the calculus & induction etc in further math easier than mechanics, somethings not right there.

Mechanics (at a-level) is pretty basic rules and with some practice should be easy. If you are doing further pure then mechanics should be a walk, maybe just make sure you drill the fundamentals again.

Do you actually think stuff like De Moivres theorem is easier than F=ma
Yeah lol idk why
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