Does it matter where you get your undergraduate degree from? Watch

mattwj10
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If you want to apply to Oxbridge or LSE etc for an economics masters does it matter where you went to University for the economics degree, I was also thinking of doing ppe so would doing that at a lower tier uni stop you from getting into the above for masters at economics? Thanks
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emily_000
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(Original post by mattwj10)
If you want to apply to Oxbridge or LSE etc for an economics masters does it matter where you went to University for the economics degree, I was also thinking of doing ppe so would doing that at a lower tier uni stop you from getting into the above for masters at economics? Thanks
no it doesn't matter.
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ajj2000
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(Original post by emily_000)
no it doesn't matter.
What makes you believe that?
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emily_000
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(Original post by ajj2000)
What makes you believe that?
In my opinion your classification is more important, a 3rd, a 2:2, a 2:1, a 1st. For example if there are two candidates for an interview and the first one has a 2:2 from Oxford and the second one has a 1st from Manchester...they will choose the second one with the first not the one from Oxford.

Another thing that is important is the content of your degree and if you do have work experience or not.

Apart from this all employees, MOST of them ask for a 2:1 not an Oxford graduate. Same with other universities, their entry requirements are a 2:1 (not all of them are asking for a 2:1 but still).

University of Oxford entry requirements-https://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/courses/mphil-economics?wssl=1

LSE entry requirements-http://www.lse.ac.uk/study-at-lse/Graduate/Degree-programmes-2020/MSc-Economics

Oxford says:
Degree-level qualifications

As a minimum, applicants should hold or be predicted to achieve the equivalent of the following UK qualifications:

a first-class or strong upper second-class undergraduate degree with honours in economics.
Applicants must demonstrate a strong quantitative preparation.

Candidates with a first degree in another related discipline should demonstrate how their academic background prepares them for graduate study in economics.

LSE says:
First class honours degree in economics or equivalent with concentration in economics and quantitative subjects. Successful candidates will typically have achieved very good examination results in university-level two-semester length courses in [a] mathematics (both advanced calculus and linear algebra), [b] econometrics and statistics, [c] intermediate macro and microeconomics.

If your first degree is not in economics, you should apply to take the MSc Economics (2 year) programme. Candidates with a technical degree and a strong quantitative background might wish to consider applying to MSc Econometrics and Mathematical Economics.

Competition for places at the School is high. This means that even if you meet our minimum entry requirements, this does not guarantee you an offer of admission.

No one wants you to be a graduate from a specific university.

So, in my opinion no it doesn't matter. (This is my opinion of course, other people might have a different opinion from me). And I don't know about the PPE you should email Oxford and LSE.
Last edited by emily_000; 3 weeks ago
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ajj2000
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(Original post by emily_000)
In my opinion your classification is more important, a 3rd, a 2:2, a 2:1, a 1st. For example if there are two candidates for an interview and the first one has a 2:2 from Oxford and the second one has a 1st from Manchester...they will choose the second one with the first not the one from Oxford.

Apart from this all employees, MOST of them are asking for a 2:1 not an Oxford graduate. Same with other universities, their entry requirements are a 2:1 (not all of them are asking for a 2:1 but still)
But the question was specifically asking about postgrad economics degrees at Oxbridge and LSE. They may have specific preferences - and pretty much require a first or very high 2.1 in any case.
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emily_000
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(Original post by ajj2000)
But the question was specifically asking about postgrad economics degrees at Oxbridge and LSE. They may have specific preferences - and pretty much require a first or very high 2.1 in any case.
I know that. But nobody cares where did you do your degree. They care about the content of your degree, if it has enough content for the course that you want to do, your classification and if you have work experience or no. (This is my opinion of course, other people might have a different opinion from me)

University of Oxford entry requirements-https://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/courses/mphil-economics?wssl=1

LSE entry requirements-http://www.lse.ac.uk/study-at-lse/Graduate/Degree-programmes-2020/MSc-Economics
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threeportdrift
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(Original post by emily_000)
I know that. But nobody cares where did you do your degree. They care about the content of your degree, if it has enough content for the course that you want to do, your classification and if you have work experience or no. (This is my opinion of course, other people might have a different opinion from me)
Is your opinion based on any direct experience of the admissions process, or are you just recycling the usual TSR twaddle or having a wild arsed guess?
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IrrationalRoot
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(Original post by emily_000)
(This is my opinion of course, other people might have a different opinion from me)
Opinion is irrelevant here though, because the question has an objective answer.
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Qup
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(Original post by threeportdrift)
Is your opinion based on any direct experience of the admissions process, or are you just recycling the usual TSR twaddle or having a wild arsed guess?
Is the usual TSR twaddle inaccurate?
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ajj2000
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(Original post by Qup)
Is the usual TSR twaddle inaccurate?
If it wasn't inaccurate it wouldn't be twaddle.
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threeportdrift
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(Original post by mattwj10)
If you want to apply to Oxbridge or LSE etc for an economics masters does it matter where you went to University for the economics degree, I was also thinking of doing ppe so would doing that at a lower tier uni stop you from getting into the above for masters at economics? Thanks
It's very unlikely that PPE anywhere, especially below Oxford, would give you enough maths/economics to do a Masters in Economics at Oxbridge or LSE.

You only chance would be to do Economics at undergrad, and then you'd have to take the more empirical/mathematical modules.

You can often see the course members on MPhil courses at these institutions, so it might be worth looking at some of their backgrounds.
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ajj2000
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(Original post by emily_000)
I

University of Oxford entry requirements-https://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/courses/mphil-economics?wssl=1

LSE entry requirements-http://www.lse.ac.uk/study-at-lse/Graduate/Degree-programmes-2020/MSc-Economics
Neither of those webpages is very helpful. They note minimum requirements but don't give any guidance to the decision making process.
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mattwj10
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(Original post by threeportdrift)
It's very unlikely that PPE anywhere, especially below Oxford, would give you enough maths/economics to do a Masters in Economics at Oxbridge or LSE.

You only chance would be to do Economics at undergrad, and then you'd have to take the more empirical/mathematical modules.

You can often see the course members on MPhil courses at these institutions, so it might be worth looking at some of their backgrounds.
Thanks how can you find the page with the members of the course I have searched but can’t find it? Thanks
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CCIE2020
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It makes no difference. Assuming that aren't after humanities, then you are screwed.
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mattwj10
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(Original post by CCIE2020)
It makes no difference. Assuming that aren't after humanities, then you are screwed.
What do you mean?
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CCIE2020
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(Original post by mattwj10)
What do you mean?
Degree in History from Oxford beats the one from Swindon but you are both going to work in the same call center.... Look for a school that can realistically hook you up with an employer. All your potential promotions, progress or specialized/expensive training paid by your employer etc, will all be only about your attitude and experience.
I understand that for obvious reasons it works differently for people doing law or medicine but for the vast majority it is as I say.
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Qup
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(Original post by ajj2000)
If it wasn't inaccurate it wouldn't be twaddle.
Yeah, I doubt its actual twaddle then.
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threeportdrift
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(Original post by Qup)
Yeah, I doubt its actual twaddle then.
Right, because TSR is known for the general accuracy of its advice especially in threads like this. Never has anyone dared to, say pontificate on the value of a humanities degree without even having got a degree themselves :rolleyes:
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Qup
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(Original post by threeportdrift)
Right, because TSR is known for the general accuracy of its advice especially in threads like this. Never has anyone dared to, say pontificate on the value of a humanities degree without even having got a degree themselves :rolleyes:
You do realise that one does not need to own a degree to know or be aware as to whether or not it has actual worth to the economy? Seriously, what's more important to someone requesting for your services: where you got an A* in dog studies from, or your experience, skill-set, likability, performance, etc. in regards to doing what they ask of you?

Anyway, I'm not entirely sure as to why employers would care, particularly in this day and age, about where you had studied in the first place unless the job specifically required you to have studied in a specific place. Wouldn't it be in their best interest to focus on gauging your worth to the company based on the interview or recommendation?
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threeportdrift
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(Original post by Qup)
You do realise that one does not need to own a degree to know or be aware as to whether or not it has actual worth to the economy? Seriously, what's more important to someone requesting for your services: where you got an A* in dog studies from, or your experience, skill-set, likability, performance, etc. in regards to doing what they ask of you?

Anyway, I'm not entirely sure as to why employers would care, particularly in this day and age, about where you had studied in the first place unless the job specifically required you to have studied in a specific place. Wouldn't it be in their best interest to focus on gauging your worth to the company based on the interview or recommendation?
Because time after time, the averages show that the better your university, the more competitive you are in employment. Of course there are outliers and specialist institutions etc, but basically the Oxbridge > Russell Group > the next level > the rest etc is borne out time after time. Reputation comes from somewhere it isn't random.

You aren't entirely sure why employers would care because you aren't an employer. Recruitment is difficult and very expensive, you minimise risk by searching for candidates in places that have previously sent you strong candidates. It's just one small but effective part of risk reduction.
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