Thoughts on contextual offers? Watch

Emiluu
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I am not eligible for one however I find it interesting that it seems people can get one for having the right postcode although they don’t come from a ”poor” family and happen to go to a school where others don’t get one due to not having the right postcode, even if their household income is lower?

Maybe I’m interpreting it wrong idk..

I just feel that even if I was eligible and given such an offer I’d feel slightly undermined and I have heard people saying they disagree with it (more so people at “prestigious” universities) who themselves come from a more privileged background.

I was just wondering what people think (agree/disagree) out of curiosity as I’m not very educated on it.
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Levi.-
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(Original post by Emiluu)
I am not eligible for one however I find it interesting that it seems people can get one for having the right postcode although they don’t come from a ”poor” family and happen to go to a school where others don’t get one due to not having the right postcode, even if their household income is lower?

Maybe I’m interpreting it wrong idk..

I just feel that even if I was eligible and given such an offer I’d feel slightly undermined and I have heard people saying they disagree with it (more so people at “prestigious” universities) who themselves come from a more privileged background.

I was just wondering what people think (agree/disagree) out of curiosity as I’m not very educated on it.
Yeah its definitely weird, I live up north with an engineer as a father and a doctor/business woman as a mother. Literally my entire family are either doctors or economists and yet my postcode, and grammar school's postcode, qualify me for various access programmes like summer schools and the sort. My household income is around 100k post tax yet i get so many free opportunities because university progression is quite low in my town as well as the average household income whereas many of my friends who have single parents and not great circumstances don't qualify because their postcode is deemed to be good. I have no real issue with the free outreach stuff but having lower grade requirements seems a tad bit too much since postcode isn't always an accurate indication of deprivation since it misses out many people. o well what can ye do
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Deggs_14
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I think it’s two things, a marketing tactics, and causes apathy.
Only the top/ Russel group universities give you a conditional offer if you already have your a level or equivalent grades, ie if you’re applying during a gap year or whatever, and fair enough. As you already have your grades then you should know the outcome.

But it’s the lower ranked universities that give out lots of conditional offers. They will receive a lot more applications that people that will actually go there, and so providing unconditional offers or “unconditional upon firm choice” is their way of enticing applicants. They are business after all and need to guarantee their clients, so their is a question of morality and ethicality tbh.

But then that’s only natural. The biggest detriment I must say is that is causes apathy and complacency upon students. They act as if they’re a levels no longer matter as they have a guaranteed place at university, so it’s sort of a “why bother?” attitude. But then they forget in small print that their unconditional offer can be revoked, or that the university isn’t optimal or worse than where they could have gone, had they done more work.

Overal I’m against them, as students won’t be prepared for the work at university if they do terribly or have the wrong attitude during their a levels.
Last edited by Deggs_14; 3 weeks ago
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Emiluu
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(Original post by Levi.-)
Yeah its definitely weird, I live up north with an engineer as a father and a doctor/business woman as a mother. Literally my entire family are either doctors or economists and yet my postcode, and grammar school's postcode, qualify me for various access programmes like summer schools and the sort. My household income is around 100k post tax yet i get so many free opportunities because university progression is quite low in my town as well as the average household income whereas many of my friends who have single parents and not great circumstances don't qualify because their postcode is deemed to be good. I have no real issue with the free outreach stuff but having lower grade requirements seems a tad bit too much since postcode isn't always an accurate indication of deprivation since it misses out many people. o well what can ye do
I am certainly not in need of one as I have exceeded standard requirements quite easily and certainly would not class myself as “underprivileged ”. Just find it interesting how u say u are eligible for things which I wouldn’t be although my post tax household income is probably around 1/3 of urs. Seems they’ve got the requirements for eligibility a bit wrong..
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Levi.-
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(Original post by Emiluu)
I am certainly not in need of one as I have exceeded standard requirements quite easily and certainly would not class myself as “underprivileged ”. Just find it interesting how u say u are eligible for things which I wouldn’t be although my post tax household income is probably around 1/3 of urs. Seems they’ve got the requirements for eligibility a bit wrong..
Yeah as i said, it's problematic; perhaps a larger focus on household income rather than postcode would be beneficial.
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Levi.-
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Also the other guy is talking about unconditional offers instead of contextual offers right?
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Deggs_14
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Oh this is about contextual offers not unconditional offers.. oops lol
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Emiluu
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(Original post by Deggs_14)
Oh this is about contextual offers not unconditional offers.. oops lol
Yeah I was getting confused, though I understand what you said. Being Scottish I have and will only receive unconditional offers (which can’t be revoked) due to having already exceeded entry requirements for the 3 (in my opinion) top unis here, and it definitely has made me lose motivation to continue studying. In fact to study medicine here I would still have had to continue my studies which is what put me off and led to me opting to apply for psychology instead. It definitely encourages people to take the easy option and I really hope I don’t regret not pushing myself a bit further, as I attained perfect grades with little effort so medicine would’ve been something I think I’d be quite good at as well as being morally rewarding.

Although I did apply to Durham and received a conditional (though due to laziness I’ll probably ignore it, and I like Edinburgh better anyway.. I think) and am waiting on and response from Oxford which currently is the only thing which could restore my motivation. So I do agree that unconditional offers aren’t that great long term.
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J Papi
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(Original post by Emiluu)
I am not eligible for one however I find it interesting that it seems people can get one for having the right postcode although they don’t come from a ”poor” family and happen to go to a school where others don’t get one due to not having the right postcode, even if their household income is lower?
One can criticise two things about contextual offers:

1. That the requirements/hoops you need to jump through to get a contextual offer capture people who aren't disadvantaged and/or don't capture people who are disadvantaged
2. That the concept of giving lower offers to disadvantaged people is wrong, even if we can accurately identify/target all disadvantaged people

Your concern seems to be with point 1, not point 2
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gjd800
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Grateful for mine, and I think i've paid the debt now, so to speak
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Emiluu
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(Original post by J Papi)
One can criticise two things about contextual offers:

1. That the requirements/hoops you need to jump through to get a contextual offer capture people who aren't disadvantaged and/or don't capture people who are disadvantaged
2. That the concept of giving lower offers to disadvantaged people is wrong, even if we can accurately identify/target all disadvantaged people

Your concern seems to be with point 1, not point 2
I understand point 2 to an extent as I do think it should be based mostly on academic purposes (especially at more prestigious / strongly academic-focused unis). I don’t think it’s right to just assume the reason someone’s grades aren’t as high is solely because of their (not even necessarily) disadvantaged background which seems to be the justification. This is the one thing I appreciate about unis offering interviews as it allows a good insight into academic potential without making such assumptions.
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J Papi
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(Original post by gjd800)
Grateful for mine, and I think i've paid the debt now, so to speak
did they even have them back in the Stone Age???
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gjd800
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(Original post by J Papi)
did they even have them back in the Stone Age???
i just had to walk past the burning bush and submit my circs on stone tablets
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_ap12
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Personally I think they are a piss take.
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