Pany5689
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i want to be an accountant and i know it's virtually impossible to start from the bottom with no experience/qualifications unless it's an apprenticeship but i don't have a levels so i want to do it online to gain either the aat or acca qualification so i just have two questions which is better and if i do the qualification online can i still use it to apply for jobs saying that i am part/fully qualified?
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kkboyk
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(Original post by Pany5689)
i want to be an accountant and i know it's virtually impossible to start from the bottom with no experience/qualifications unless it's an apprenticeship but i don't have a levels so i want to do it online to gain either the aat or acca qualification so i just have two questions which is better and if i do the qualification online can i still use it to apply for jobs saying that i am part/fully qualified?
ACCA is an advanced qualification for those already working in accounting that leads to being chartered accountant, whereas AAT is generally considered to be the first step towards becoming an accountant. The AAT qualifications are an ideal starting point for someone with no previous accountancy experience and often only require enthusiasm to access their courses. Typically, ACCA qualifications require relevant qualifications (including relevant degrees or AAT) or substantial experience working in the industry.

A part qualified accountant are accountants who have already sat and passed some of their exams for ACA, ACCA, CIMA or other related accounting qualification.

I'd probably recommend you to apply to apprenticeship, where most firms will fund you to do the AAT and pay you a salary whilst working. Once you complete that, the firm may be willing to sponsor you to do either ACA or ACCA.
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Pany5689
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(Original post by kkboyk)
ACCA is an advanced qualification for those already working in accounting that leads to being chartered accountant, whereas AAT is generally considered to be the first step towards becoming an accountant. The AAT qualifications are an ideal starting point for someone with no previous accountancy experience and often only require enthusiasm to access their courses. Typically, ACCA qualifications require relevant qualifications (including relevant degrees or AAT) or substantial experience working in the industry.

A part qualified accountant are accountants who have already sat and passed some of their exams for ACA, ACCA, CIMA or other related accounting qualification.

I'd probably recommend you to apply to apprenticeship, where most firms will fund you to do the AAT and pay you a salary whilst working. Once you complete that, the firm may be willing to sponsor you to do either ACA or ACCA.
Thank you so much for explaining everything! Unfortunately I can’t do an apprenticeship in this area as I do not have a levels that are always required.
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kkboyk
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(Original post by Pany5689)
Thank you so much for explaining everything! Unfortunately I can’t do an apprenticeship in this area as I do not have a levels that are always required.
Which area, and how old are you if you dont mind me asking? There are many apprenticeships open to those without a levels.
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Pany5689
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(Original post by kkboyk)
Which area, and how old are you if you dont mind me asking? There are many apprenticeships open to those without a levels.
In accounting as all of them require a levels and there’s isn’t any finance ones where I live as I live in a very small town and I’m 21
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ajj2000
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Can you look for an entry level job - such as an accounts clerk or purchase ledger - and sit some AAT exams while working?
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Pany5689
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(Original post by ajj2000)
Can you look for an entry level job - such as an accounts clerk or purchase ledger - and sit some AAT exams while working?
I could but they all require a minimum of 1 year experience so my application gets rejected
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ajj2000
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(Original post by Pany5689)
I could but they all require a minimum of 1 year experience so my application gets rejected
What qualifications do you have? GCSE’s? A levels? I’d risk applying anyway- lots of people over spec jobs.
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Pany5689
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(Original post by ajj2000)
What qualifications do you have? GCSE’s? A levels? I’d risk applying anyway- lots of people over spec jobs.
Just GCSEs what do you mean over spec jobs?
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ajj2000
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(Original post by Pany5689)
Just GCSEs what do you mean over spec jobs?
a lot of job adverts ask for more than the candidate who gets the job actually has. For example the advert states one years experience but if the company doesnt get enough suitable applicants they interview others with less or no experience. Or interview one person without the experience to see if they might be a better fit.
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countduckula1906
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Do ACCA or ACA
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ajj2000
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(Original post by countduckula1906)
Do ACCA or ACA
Why? Any reasons for this advice?
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Pany5689
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(Original post by ajj2000)
a lot of job adverts ask for more than the candidate who gets the job actually has. For example the advert states one years experience but if the company doesnt get enough suitable applicants they interview others with less or no experience. Or interview one person without the experience to see if they might be a better fit.
I never thought of it that way, so is it worth applying to jobs that are ‘entry level’ with a minimum of a years experience required even if I don’t have any?
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Pany5689
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(Original post by ajj2000)
a lot of job adverts ask for more than the candidate who gets the job actually has. For example the advert states one years experience but if the company doesnt get enough suitable applicants they interview others with less or no experience. Or interview one person without the experience to see if they might be a better fit.
Hi, you know because I don’t have any experience in accounts, if I do a couple free online courses in things relating to bookkeeping/purchase ledger etc so you reckon this would be beneficial at all to put on my cv in the qualification section?
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ajj2000
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(Original post by Pany5689)
I never thought of it that way, so is it worth applying to jobs that are ‘entry level’ with a minimum of a years experience required even if I don’t have any?
Yes - send a CV and a clear covering letter. Takes ten minutes maximum.
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ajj2000
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(Original post by Pany5689)
Hi, you know because I don’t have any experience in accounts, if I do a couple free online courses in things relating to bookkeeping/purchase ledger etc so you reckon this would be beneficial at all to put on my cv in the qualification section?
If its free it doesnt hurt too much. Have you tried local colleges to see if they have any free AAT courses? The first thing I would do would be to go to a library and borrow a couple of books for Excel and get some competence with it.
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