mum demands kids clothes have with ‘boys’ and ‘girls’ labels be scrapped Watch

Napp
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#21
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(Original post by sinfonietta)
I consider gendered clothing an outdated concept and shop in both the men's and women's sections, so I'm all for it. I wouldn't fight for it or call gendered clothing bull**** though. I doubt a three year old genuinely would either!
Who knows little baby whats it called might just be nauseatingly precocious
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DiddyDecAlt
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(Original post by Leviathan1611)
so you realise you're putting on the wrong gendered clothing.


* ^this is a joke
I wear all genders of clothes thank you very much :smug:
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Ay_Arriba
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Clothes have different fits and sizing systems if they’re not unisex. Style and colour of clothes aside, there are two sexes with two generally different average measurements. Leave it be.
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ByEeek
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(Original post by Ay_Arriba)
Clothes have different fits and sizing systems if they’re not unisex. Style and colour of clothes aside, there are two sexes with two generally different average measurements. Leave it be.
That's not actually true. Up to the age of about 7, boys and girls are physically equal and strength and shape. What I object to is that girls must be pink princesses whilst boys must be blue and beige. We used to dress our boys in all manner of bright clothes but after the age of 6 the choice is limited.

You will also note that slogans are gendered. Girls are pretty and boys are cheeky / naughty. Hardly words I would use to describe my kids. Why can't girls be brave and boys gentle?
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looloo2134
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(Original post by sinfonietta)
I consider gendered clothing an outdated concept and shop in both the men's and women's sections, so I'm all for it. I wouldn't fight for it or call gendered clothing bull**** though. I doubt a three year old genuinely would either!
Women clothes are other smaller then men also most men would not like to wear a dress but women like to wear jean, legging etc. It would be a waste of time and money make adult clothes non-gendered.
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DiddyDecAlt
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(Original post by looloo2134)
Women clothes are other smaller then men also most men would not like to wear a dress but women like to wear jean, legging etc. It would be a waste of time and money make adult clothes non-gendered.
A dress in summer really keeps your nuts fresh.
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Just my opinion
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By Eek said..."Why can't girls be brave and boys gentle?"

They can ofcourse but the labels are only reflecting what the majority of boys and girls are like.
Ask any infant/junior school teacher would they rather have,a classroom of boys or a classroom of girls.

When my daughter's were little it really pissed me off that the boys clothes were lots of choices in browns, greens, blues, rust and autumnal colours, whereas the girls tended(not exclusively) to be pink, black, silver and sparkley.
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Rock Fan
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:facepalm:
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Surnia
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(Original post by DiddyDecAlt)
:gasp:

Why is this a thing?
The favourite theories on button positioning are based on the right hand being dominant:

1. Well-to-do women would have a maid to help them dress and it makes it easier for a right-hander to do up someone else's buttons.

2. Men could conceal a pistol within the LH side of their shirt/jacket and would be less likely to catch the handle of a sword in their placket when drawing it, given that swords are usually worn on the left.
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looloo2134
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(Original post by Just my opinion)
By Eek said..."Why can't girls be brave and boys gentle?"

They can ofcourse but the labels are only reflecting what the majority of boys and girls are like.
Ask any infant/junior school teacher would they rather have,a classroom of boys or a classroom of girls.

When my daughter's were little it really pissed me off that the boys clothes were lots of choices in browns, greens, blues, rust and autumnal colours, whereas the girls tended(not exclusively) to be pink, black, silver and sparkley.
My experience with a small child who was 4 at the time was that he starting crying because he through he was going wear girls clothes
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tazarooni89
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(Original post by ByEeek)
That's not actually true. Up to the age of about 7, boys and girls are physically equal and strength and shape. What I object to is that girls must be pink princesses whilst boys must be blue and beige. We used to dress our boys in all manner of bright clothes but after the age of 6 the choice is limited.

You will also note that slogans are gendered. Girls are pretty and boys are cheeky / naughty. Hardly words I would use to describe my kids. Why can't girls be brave and boys gentle?
Surely clothes designers are just catering for what the majority of their consumers are likely to buy.

A girl is more likely than a boy to want a slogan on their t-shirt about being pretty, or a picture of a unicorn, or sparkles etc. And a boy is more likely to want something else.

I don’t see that as an imposition from the clothing company about how boys and girls “must” live their lives, or any restriction on what they can and can’t do. They just want to sell as much as possible, and so cater for whatever their demand happens to be.

But if a boy really wants a pink, sparkly t-shirt that badly, nobody’s stopping him from buying one, regardless of which floor of the shop it might be on or what the label says.
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Capitalist_Lamb
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(Original post by sinfonietta)
I consider gendered clothing an outdated concept and shop in both the men's and women's sections, so I'm all for it. I wouldn't fight for it or call gendered clothing bull**** though. I doubt a three year old genuinely would either!
It's for convenience though. Imagine the thousands of clothes that are online and having to shop by all. You would struggle to find anything you wanted. With simple tags such as mens and womens you can immediately drop the search results to the ones most people are trying to find. It's all about efficiency. Stores don't care about all this, all they care about is money. If doing this made them more money then they would do it in a heartbeat but it would make the customer satisfaction levels drop as it would take more time to find what they wanted and so would persuade shoppers to go elsewhere.

Just my opinion on it.
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AngryJellyfish
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It was the fact that most kids clothes have size labels with ages on that caused me more grief as a child. I was always small, but I couldn't understand why that meant I had to wear stuff labeled for kids 1-2 years younger than me. :bawling:
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Obolinda
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(Original post by AngryJellyfish)
It was the fact that most kids clothes have size labels with ages on that caused me more grief as a child. I was always small, but I couldn't understand why that meant I had to wear stuff labeled for kids 1-2 years younger than me. :bawling:
Don't think I've ever seen a person that wears their actual age 🤣 I always wore the ages above until now! I wear 15-16 or just adults clothing.
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chazwomaq
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
Sure, why not? A t-shirt is a t-shirt, and boys and girls can decide for themselves whether they want to wear an item of clothing that could be considered gendered in our society (e.g. a skirt or a dress; both items of clothing my sister refused to wear growing up, just because she didn't like them).
That is exactly the situation right now. Nobody is stopping anyone from buying or wearing what they like.

What is awful is the idea that you should ban something just because you don't like it.
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Good bloke
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Clothing manufacturer: We shall learn from experience, conduct market research and sell clothes in a way that we think helps our buyers and reflects what they want. If that involves having stereotyping boys and girls, so be it. But we will be happy to sell boy-labelled clothes for girls and vice versa.

SJWs: No you won't. We insist that you ignore your market and socially re-engineer society in the way we want. Your customers' views are not as important as our views.
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ByEeek
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(Original post by tazarooni89)
Surely clothes designers are just catering for what the majority of their consumers are likely to buy.

A girl is more likely than a boy to want a slogan on their t-shirt about being pretty, or a picture of a unicorn, or sparkles etc. And a boy is more likely to want something else.

I don’t see that as an imposition from the clothing company about how boys and girls “must” live their lives, or any restriction on what they can and can’t do. They just want to sell as much as possible, and so cater for whatever their demand happens to be.

But if a boy really wants a pink, sparkly t-shirt that badly, nobody’s stopping him from buying one, regardless of which floor of the shop it might be on or what the label says.
Of course manufacturers are satisfying a demand in the same way that farmers are happy to pump their animals full of anti-biotics to satisfy the demand for cheap meat. But as we know this isn't necessarily good for society.

People are generally ignorant of seemingly harmess things. Slogans about being pretty are born out by the mental health issues so many young girls have over their looks and a lack of aspiration. On the flip side, boys are not allowed to show their emotion. After all, boys don't cry do they? This pent emotion presents itself through violence in young men and often towards women.
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tazarooni89
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(Original post by ByEeek)
Of course manufacturers are satisfying a demand in the same way that farmers are happy to pump their animals full of anti-biotics to satisfy the demand for cheap meat. But as we know this isn't necessarily good for society.

People are generally ignorant of seemingly harmess things. Slogans about being pretty are born out by the mental health issues so many young girls have over their looks and a lack of aspiration. On the flip side, boys are not allowed to show their emotion. After all, boys don't cry do they? This pent emotion presents itself through violence in young men and often towards women.
Sorry but that sounds several gigantic leaps in reasoning to me.


A t shirt does not tell you what you are or aren’t “allowed” to do. Yes it’s true that boys/men are less likely to cry in public. I tend not to myself either. But that’s because I myself choose not to, not because some t shirt told me I can’t.

Furthermore, I don’t think it’s a good idea to absolve violent men of blame for their actions by attributing it to some sort of (non-existent) law against crying. If someone is violent it’s because they chose to be violent, and must be penalised for it.

Similarly, a t shirt does not control what a person “must” do either. Are girls/women genuinely so stupid that they’re going to construct their whole set of values, and consider being pretty to be the most important thing in the world, just because of some writing on a t shirt? I don’t think so.


Your theory seems to have very little faith in the intelligence and ability of both men and woman to think freely and independently, and make choices for themselves.
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Pinkisk
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
Sure, why not? A t-shirt is a t-shirt, and boys and girls can decide for themselves whether they want to wear an item of clothing that could be considered gendered in our society (e.g. a skirt or a dress; both items of clothing my sister refused to wear growing up, just because she didn't like them).

Of course though, this suggestion will be railed against by imbeciles afraid of any deviation from the rigid and narrow structures of patriarchal heternormative society, who will much sooner point at those words and screech about "snowflakes" and "ess-jay-dubya's" rather actually try and engage in any critique of how they have been taught to perceive things.
I find your comment heterophobic.

You whinge about rigid structures and people "screeching" about you being "snowflakes" and SJWs because you hold different views....Yet your types resort to the same exact tactics. You "screech" at anyone who criticises your ideas ....labelling them with disparaging titles; "Nazis" and "Neckbeards" etc etc and you demand anyone and everyone that does not conform with your rigid views be marginalised, ostracised, censored and silenced and where you fail to do this you resort to good old fashioned violence. You are the very same things you claim to hate.
Last edited by Pinkisk; 1 week ago
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anarchism101
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(Original post by Just my opinion)
They can ofcourse but the labels are only reflecting what the majority of boys and girls are like.
Are they reflecting it, or are they in fact encouraging it? Making it a self-fulfilling prophecy?
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