mum demands kids clothes have with ‘boys’ and ‘girls’ labels be scrapped Watch

tazarooni89
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#81
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(Original post by ByEeek)
1. Why did bringing in charges affect behaviour?
2. Why do the slogans we are made to wear affect our behaviour?

We know the answer to hypothisis 1.
Surely the only way to test hypothisis 2 is to try it no?
There is far too much wrong with this.

1. Why are we even putting these two things next to each other when they’re completely unrelated? We know why charges affect behaviour; because people don’t want to pay the charges. But there is no clear dependence of someone’s career choice on a t shirt.

2. Even if a t shirt slogan influences someone’s career choice, so what? It’s still their choice, they’re not being forced into it against their will. I repeat, no woman is sitting there going “I wish I could have gone into STEM but that mean old t shirt didn’t let me!” If they want to go into STEM they can go into STEM, and if they don’t, they don’t have to. Why do we have any business interfering with that?

3. Testing a hypothesis is not a good reason for banning something. It is completely authoritarian; what gives anyone the right to do this? I could select anything that I don’t particularly like and insist that is banned because “let’s just test the hypothesis to see if it causes cancer”.


So if you’re arguing to ban gendered clothing just to test out to see if it causes women to start applying for STEM careers, even when they otherwise wouldn’t have particularly wanted to anyway, I have to say it sounds like a very pointless exercise based on some very contrived reasoning.
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ByEeek
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(Original post by tazarooni89)
There is far too much wrong with this.

1. Why are we even putting these two things next to each other when they’re completely unrelated? We know why charges affect behaviour; because people don’t want to pay the charges. But there is no clear dependence of someone’s career choice on a t shirt.

2. Even if a t shirt slogan influences someone’s career choice, so what? It’s still their choice, they’re not being forced into it against their will. I repeat, no woman is sitting there going “I wish I could have gone into STEM but that mean old t shirt didn’t let me!” If they want to go into STEM they can go into STEM, and if they don’t, they don’t have to. Why do we have any business interfering with that?

3. Testing a hypothesis is not a good reason for banning something. It is completely authoritarian; what gives anyone the right to do this? I could select anything that I don’t particularly like and insist that is banned because “let’s just test the hypothesis to see if it causes cancer”.


So if you’re arguing to ban gendered clothing just to test out to see if it causes women to start applying for STEM careers, even when they otherwise wouldn’t have particularly wanted to anyway, I have to say it sounds like a very pointless exercise based on some very contrived reasoning.
Ok. So please answer this question. Why do you think when asked the question "Whonis better, girls or boys?" a class of 6 year-olds all said boys with the exception of one girl?

Do you not think that is disturbing? That at the age of 6 girls already feel inferior to boys? Why is that?
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tazarooni89
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(Original post by ByEeek)
Ok. So please answer this question. Why do you think when asked the question "Whonis better, girls or boys?" a class of 6 year-olds all said boys with the exception of one girl?

Do you not think that is disturbing? That at the age of 6 girls already feel inferior to boys? Why is that?
If it’s true and not quoted out of context, then yes of course it’s disturbing. I haven’t a clue why they all felt that way.

But I see no reason to infer that gendered clothing must be the cause of it.
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ByEeek
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(Original post by tazarooni89)
But I see no reason to infer that gendered clothing must be the cause of it.
Because our identity is formed by the messages given to us by those closest to us. Children of religeous patents become religeous not because they an informed decision but because their religeous identity is given to them by their parents.

Similarly girls get the idea that looks are everything because they are complimented as pretty or beautiful. And of course if they are not complimented like that it must be because they are ugly. Which explains why girls as young as 8 talk about having plastic surgery.

By contrast, boys don't cry right? And boys are cheeky and naughty. So unsurprising, many boys are just that. Unable to express their emotions and play to expectations.

Of course clothing slogans aren't soley responsible but are symptomatic of and a contrubuting factor towards gender identities parents stubornly want to impose on their kids, that girls are pretty, quiet and subservient and boys are cheeky monkeys who don't cry like a girl.

It is depressingly sad.
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tazarooni89
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(Original post by ByEeek)
Because our identity is formed by the messages given to us by those closest to us. Children of religeous patents become religeous not because they an informed decision but because their religeous identity is given to them by their parents.

Similarly girls get the idea that looks are everything because they are complimented as pretty or beautiful. And of course if they are not complimented like that it must be because they are ugly. Which explains why girls as young as 8 talk about having plastic surgery.

By contrast, boys don't cry right? And boys are cheeky and naughty. So unsurprising, many boys are just that. Unable to express their emotions and play to expectations.

Of course clothing slogans aren't soley responsible but are symptomatic of and a contrubuting factor towards gender identities parents stubornly want to impose on their kids, that girls are pretty, quiet and subservient and boys are cheeky monkeys who don't cry like a girl.

It is depressingly sad.

Have you ever asked a religious person “did you make an informed decision to follow your religion, or do you only believe it because your parents brainwashed you into it?” Do they all agree that it’s the latter?

You claim it’s the latter - but how would you know? If someone thinks they have made a conscious, informed decision, who are you to tell them otherwise or attempt to override it?


I could equally suggest that the only reason you think that gendered clothing is such a problem is because you’ve been socially conditioned and influenced to think that - not because it’s an objective, informed belief.
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