Licy2310
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I am a Final Year Undergraduate studying Law and for the most part, I haven’t had any personal trouble with the material.

I really enjoy the Family Law module, but I’ve noticed recently that I’m more triggered than normal, which is potentially because we have just been over Domestic Violence.
Is it bad to be sensitised given the nature of the material and my personal association to it?

It seems really pathetic to say so.
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by Answers212121)
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You aren't a medical professional, so don't diagnose others. Beyond that, your characterisation of PTSD is incorrect, as is your assumption that it only presents in one way among military individuals. Further, the OP was not asking whether they had PTSD, they were asking if it was an issue to have such a response while studying the material. Frankly this post is at best insensitive and irrelevant to the topic, and at worst contributes to the continuing stigma around mental health issues and in particular PTSD, as well as people who have been affected by domestic abuse, which make it that much harder for people experiencing those problems to seek help in the first place.

(Original post by Licy2310)
I am a Final Year Undergraduate studying Law and for the most part, I haven’t had any personal trouble with the material.

I really enjoy the Family Law module, but I’ve noticed recently that I’m more triggered than normal, which is potentially because we have just been over Domestic Violence.
Is it bad to be sensitised given the nature of the material and my personal association to it?

It seems really pathetic to say so.
Given your background it is perhaps not unsurprising to have a negative association with it at the very least. I would recommend you speak with your GP and the module leader about this, so you can start looking at strategies to minimise the effect this is having on you, and possibly laying out contingencies in case it affects your academic performance. I think it is an understandable response to have and not unreasonable, the main thing I think will be looking at ways to try and avoid it affecting you as much/at all
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Answers212121
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
You aren't a medical professional, so don't diagnose others. Beyond that, your characterisation of PTSD is incorrect, as is your assumption that it only presents in one way among military individuals. Further, the OP was not asking whether they had PTSD, they were asking if it was an issue to have such a response while studying the material. Frankly this post is at best insensitive and irrelevant to the topic, and at worst contributes to the continuing stigma around mental health issues and in particular PTSD, which make it that much harder for people experiencing those problems to seek help in the first place.



Given your background it is perhaps not unsurprising to have a negative association with it at the very least. I would recommend you speak with your GP and the module leader about this, so you can start looking at strategies to minimise the effect this is having on you, and possibly laying out contingencies in case it affects your academic performance. I think it is an understandable response to have and not unreasonable, the main thing I think will be looking at ways to try and avoid it affecting you as much/at all
1. I understand if it is difficult for you to read, that's fine. If you have another look, you will see that I clarified that.
2. I am not going to give every form of PTSD and every way it can occur. I offered one example. What a silly point on your behalf?
3. Read the title - "PTSD and Family Law".
4. Your last point is utter crap. I've never read such a unapplicable point in my life. How in any way does this badly affect the stigma around mental health? How does it make it difficult for people to seek help surrounding mental health? Because I said that I doubt you can get PTSD from reading law? Are you serious? What a spanner..

If you're going to reply, which I assume you will, don't give me some more illogical crap. As well as that, don't make assumptions and put words in my mouth. Your advice at the end is identical to mine - what is the point in barging your way into a thread, bashing me for no reason with illogical and idiological arguments, and then proceeding to give the OP the same advice I have already offered? My my....
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by Answers212121)
1. I understand if it is difficult for you to read, that's fine. If you have another look, you will see that I clarified that.
2. I am not going to give every form of PTSD and every way it can occur. I offered one example. What a silly point on your behalf?
3. Read the title - "PTSD and Family Law".
4. Your last point is utter crap. I've never read such a unapplicable point in my life. How in any way does this badly affect the stigma around mental health? How does it make it difficult for people to seek help surrounding mental health? Because I said that I doubt you can get PTSD from reading law? Are you serious? What a spanner..

If you're going to reply, which I assume you will, don't give me some more illogical crap. As well as that, don't make assumptions and put words in my mouth. Your advice at the end is identical to mine - what is the point in barging your way into a thread, bashing me for no reason with illogical and idiological arguments, and then proceeding to give the OP the same advice I have already offered? My my....
You didn't offer any advice - you blamed the OP and gaslighted them in to believing the issues are their fault. Your limited example mischaracterizes PTSD and invalidates the experiences of others with it if their experiences do not match the very narrow "definition" provided. The thread title is a brief description of the content of the thread, and had you actually read the original post you would see that in no way did they ask to be told if they have PTSD or not.

People who have mental health issues, people who are affected by domestic violence, and people who experience PTSD - as well as those who experience all of the above - are materially hurt by the stigma held in society about such problems. This stigma comes about due to narrow and reductive definitions of what they encompass based on incomplete understanding usually based on inaccurate and harmful depictions in populat media, victim blaming those who suffer from such issues, and having their experiences invalidated on the basis of their not being "extreme enough" to merit consideration.

As a result of these things, such people often find it extremely difficult to even initially speak about their issues even with people they trust, much less medical professionals who can help them. It also makes it harder for them to deal with the ongoing effects of these experiences, and to ask for help or advice about them (as demonstrated). It also makes it much more difficult to encourage and kind of public discussion of the topics to improve awareness. You have failed to read the original post or respond to the question, and your response shows a callous disregard for the potential damage it can cause others.
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Answers212121
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
You didn't offer any advice - you blamed the OP and gaslighted them in to believing the issues are their fault. Your limited example mischaracterizes PTSD and invalidates the experiences of others with it if their experiences do not match the very narrow "definition" provided. The thread title is a brief description of the content of the thread, and had you actually read the original post you would see that in no way did they ask to be told if they have PTSD or not.

People who have mental health issues, people who are affected by domestic violence, and people who experience PTSD - as well as those who experience all of the above - are materially hurt by the stigma held in society about such problems. This stigma comes about due to narrow and reductive definitions of what they encompass based on incomplete understanding usually based on inaccurate and harmful depictions in populat media, victim blaming those who suffer from such issues, and having their experiences invalidated on the basis of their not being "extreme enough" to merit consideration.

As a result of these things, such people often find it extremely difficult to even initially speak about their issues even with people they trust, much less medical professionals who can help them, and make it much more difficult to encourage and kind of public discussion of the topics to improve awareness. You have failed to read the original post or respond to the question, and your response shows a callous disregard for the potential damage it can cause others.
1. No, I didn't "gaslight them "in to" believeing the issues are their fault"
2. Why would I offer a comprehensive example of PTSD? Can you not understand how difficult that would be? Go on Google Scholar and search in 'PTSD' for academic examples. You ain't getting one on some random UK students forum.
3. It wasn't a definition, it was an example. Why can't you interpret basic arguments?!?!?!
4. I did read the original post.
5. There is no stigma surrounding PTSD. Everyone supports those with it. I have NEVER encountered anyone being prejudice towards those with PTSD. I have also read books on PTSD, and I obviously sympathise with those who suffer with it. Dont dare accuse me of contributing to an illness which results in suicide and self-deterioration.
5. I agree that you shouldn't invalidate one's experience, but PTSD from reading law? Seriously. I can understand a car accident, domestic violence in itself, tragic incident, trauma, etc, but reading law on domestic violence? Do you understand what this literature entails?
6. These issues you have outlines have next to no relevance with regard to victims of PTSD seeking support. Nobody victim blames PTSD victims, nobody sneers them, nobody acts in a negative way towards them. Your perception of societal behaviour towards PTSD victims is heavily flawed.
7. Your response, once again, is idiological. Good job.
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by Answers212121)
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Every single aspect of your posting has been non-supportive of someone with PTSD (the OP), victim blaming someone with PTSD for discovering a new trigger (the OP), and you still haven't read the original post which does not ask in any capacity whether studying this law module "gave" them PTSD.

You clearly also have no idea what PTSD is since you don't even understand the basic core issue of it being triggered by other events or things after the fact, which are not necessarily the exact event reoccurring but which causes them to re-live their experience in a vivid and damaging way.
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shadowdweller
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Just a quick note to say that this really isn't the place for debate - the most important thing here is helping give OP advice, so please keep on topic, folks :hat2:
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Answers212121
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
Every single aspect of your posting has been non-supportive of someone with PTSD (the OP), victim blaming someone with PTSD for discovering a new trigger (the OP), and you still haven't read the original post which does not ask in any capacity whether studying this law module "gave" them PTSD.

You clearly also have no idea what PTSD is since you don't even understand the basic core issue of it being triggered by other events or things after the fact, which are not necessarily the exact event reoccurring but which causes them to re-live their experience in a vivid and damaging way.
This is my last response to you. Your antagonistic behaviour garners one last reply. There will be no more.

I am not victim blaming. I have read the original post. PTSD is triggered by events, usually of traumatic nature. You cannot relive domestic violence through studying the law surrounding it. You can certainly relive a traumatic event, which is the a characteristic of PTSD, e.g. (e.g. means example) a soldier suffering from PTSD due to a traumatic experience in a firefight may react badly to fireworks due to their similarities with gunshot noises. After examining articles on Google Scholar, it is observable but possibly untrue that PTSD is caused by the experience of a traumatic event. Have another read of my posts, you will observe that I never said anything about reliving traumatic events, but rather I expressed my opinion of studying an area of law as causing PTSD. I've read books on recovering PTSD veterans, I've watched videos on PTSD, I have a pretty good understanding of it as a non-health professional. Every single point you've made is irrelevant to PTSD itself but attempts to deconstruct my logical arguments as fallacies. Well, you failed. You've made multiple posts each with the same arguments. Great demonstration of your limited ability at formulating coherent and comprehensive arguments.

Again, don't reply.

To @shadowdweller, fair enough, I've ended it here.
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Licy2310
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I have PTSD from Domestic Violence that occurred within my household growing up.
I said it was triggering material, not saying the Law made me that way.
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Licy2310
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Thank you for this, the Law has nothing to do with my diagnosis. It’s just been reminding me of past events recently.
I really appreciate your support.

(Original post by artful_lounger)
You didn't offer any advice - you blamed the OP and gaslighted them in to believing the issues are their fault. Your limited example mischaracterizes PTSD and invalidates the experiences of others with it if their experiences do not match the very narrow "definition" provided. The thread title is a brief description of the content of the thread, and had you actually read the original post you would see that in no way did they ask to be told if they have PTSD or not.

People who have mental health issues, people who are affected by domestic violence, and people who experience PTSD - as well as those who experience all of the above - are materially hurt by the stigma held in society about such problems. This stigma comes about due to narrow and reductive definitions of what they encompass based on incomplete understanding usually based on inaccurate and harmful depictions in populat media, victim blaming those who suffer from such issues, and having their experiences invalidated on the basis of their not being "extreme enough" to merit consideration.

As a result of these things, such people often find it extremely difficult to even initially speak about their issues even with people they trust, much less medical professionals who can help them. It also makes it harder for them to deal with the ongoing effects of these experiences, and to ask for help or advice about them (as demonstrated). It also makes it much more difficult to encourage and kind of public discussion of the topics to improve awareness. You have failed to read the original post or respond to the question, and your response shows a callous disregard for the potential damage it can cause others.
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by Licy2310)
Thank you for this, the Law has nothing to do with my diagnosis. It’s just been reminding me of past events recently.
I really appreciate your support.
Yes, that had been my impression from your original post

My first suggestion (which has gotten lost) was that on the health side, you speak with your GP and if your universities wellbeing/counselling service if available - at the very least to get any necessary documentary evidence for your condition for the next step (and they may be able to help you with any therapies or strategies to help you cope with this for now). Then, on the academic side, speak with your personal tutor and/or the module leader about it, if you feel able to - they can then be aware and if necessary put into place any contingencies to ensure your academic results aren't affected by the matter.

Hopefully they can help you with things! It's understandable and perfectly reasonable to have the response you did when confronted with that kind of material, which can be difficult even for people without lived experience of similar situations to handle. The most important thing is to try and make use of what help is available, to ensure you are able to cope with that material without it negatively affecting you either personally or academically
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Licy2310
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I will attempt to implement that as soon as possible, as I can’t risk a decline in academic attainment given my future ambitions.

I’ve heard similar comments before regarding the ‘illegitimacy’ of my PTSD before so I’m fine with any remarks made, (hopefully in ignorance) but you really helped tonight and it’s lovely that you took the time to offer advice.

(Original post by artful_lounger)
Yes, that had been my impression from your original post

My first suggestion (which has gotten lost) was that on the health side, you speak with your GP and if your universities wellbeing/counselling service if available - at the very least to get any necessary documentary evidence for your condition for the next step (and they may be able to help you with any therapies or strategies to help you cope with this for now). Then, on the academic side, speak with your personal tutor and/or the module leader about it, if you feel able to - they can then be aware and if necessary put into place any contingencies to ensure your academic results aren't affected by the matter.

Hopefully they can help you with things! It's understandable and perfectly reasonable to have the response you did when confronted with that kind of material, which can be difficult even for people without lived experience of similar situations to handle. The most important thing is to try and make use of what help is available, to ensure you are able to cope with that material without it negatively affecting you either personally or academically
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by Licy2310)
I will attempt to implement that as soon as possible, as I can’t risk a decline in academic attainment given my future ambitions.

I’ve heard similar comments before regarding the ‘illegitimacy’ of my PTSD before so I’m fine with any remarks made, (hopefully in ignorance) but you really helped tonight and it’s lovely that you took the time to offer advice.
Glad to hopefully be of help! PTSD is covered by the Equality Act (2010) so your university is required to make reasonable adjustments in view of your suffering from it (so you should hopefully be able to get somewhere with them). You may need to provide a GP letter confirming your diagnosis or similar though
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Catherine1973
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I have noticed that our lectures in criminal law put up slides for councilling after we have discussed say rape in a lecture. We have not yet done the topic of sexual offences but I assumed it will be well signposted when we do. Thinking about sone cases they do mention battered wife syndrome quite a bit.
Could your module be switched to something else? Do 2 15 mark ones in term b to compensate for not doing this one.
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Licy2310
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I really like the module and the material and I know I can do well in it because I’m invested, I think I just need to work through my reactions to the Domestic Violence bit.
Say take that triggering energy and recycling if into a passion for change in Domestic Violence Reform, or just vulnerable people in general.

I need to get out of the Solipsistic view and more into what I can do for those that need the help I did.
If that makes sense?

(Original post by Catherine1973)
I have noticed that our lectures in criminal law put up slides for councilling after we have discussed say rape in a lecture. We have not yet done the topic of sexual offences but I assumed it will be well signposted when we do. Thinking about sone cases they do mention battered wife syndrome quite a bit.
Could your module be switched to something else? Do 2 15 mark ones in term b to compensate for not doing this one.
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