A__B__1
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Hi, I’m a third year psychology student interested in the therapy route and I like the counselling psychologist route but find it overlaps a lot with psychotherapist.
How do the two differentiate? The only difference I can find is the training. They both seem to deal with the same disorders and issues.
I understand that counselling psychologist can be done through a doctorate or a QCoP and psychotherapy done through training course at masters level.
I would also like to know how research focused the three training options are (doctorate, QCoP and psychotherapy training): are they at the same level or does one course focus on research more/less than the other?
I have asked many people and searched the internet for a long time only to be given different answers (making me more confused and frazzled) and I don’t want to pick the wrong career path especially after all the time training and the costs. Any thoughts are very much appreciated. Thanks
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Nerol
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(Original post by A__B__1)
Hi, I’m a third year psychology student interested in the therapy route and I like the counselling psychologist route but find it overlaps a lot with psychotherapist.
How do the two differentiate? The only difference I can find is the training. They both seem to deal with the same disorders and issues.
I understand that counselling psychologist can be done through a doctorate or a QCoP and psychotherapy done through training course at masters level.
I would also like to know how research focused the three training options are (doctorate, QCoP and psychotherapy training): are they at the same level or does one course focus on research more/less than the other?
I have asked many people and searched the internet for a long time only to be given different answers (making me more confused and frazzled) and I don’t want to pick the wrong career path especially after all the time training and the costs. Any thoughts are very much appreciated. Thanks
Completing a Counselling Psychology qualification will lead to doctorate status. This will inevitably mean better pay than if you were to train as a psychotherapist. Also, counselling psychologists often have very similar job opportunities as clinical psychologists.

Psychology doctorates are more research focused than psychotherapy courses, with more attention paid to research methods and the conducting of a research dissertation.

If you are mostly interested in the therapy side, MMU offer a doctorate in Psychological Therapies (1 year MSc, 2 years doctoral training), which may be a good choice. This leads to accredited psychotherapist status with the BACP. I am currently doing the MSc programmed there and it does have a heavy focus on psychological interventions. I may go on to the doctorate, or choose clinical or counselling psychology - I also haven't decided yet!

Hope this helps somewhat!

Loren
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Lord Asriel
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Technically, a psychotherapist is a broad term that potentially captures a range of different professionals that offers a form of psychotherapy. (e.g. CBT therapist, Gestalt, psychoanalytic psychotherapist, psychodynamic , systemic , psychologists, psychiatrists who practice psychotherapy etc).

Most forms of psychotherapy training will focus on a single approach. For example, if you train purely as a Gestalt psychotherapist you would mainly learn about that approach, with some academic elements. You would expect to come out highly proficient in that field.

A Counselling Psychologist would be expected to usually have exposure to multiple approaches (often Psychodynamic, CBT and Person Centered approaches, although courses vary with this). They would not be as intensely schooled in all of those approaches as a unimodal therapist (like the example above), but they may be more versatile as they can draw from multiple models from an earlier stage. A counselling psychologist would also be expected to have substantial research skills to produce a doctoral level thesis, which a traditional psychotherapy training would not require (often pegged at degree, diploma or Masters level). I don't know about QoCP, and you are better off contacting the BPS about that.

There are other advantages of being a counselling psychologist. It is a protected title- Anyone can call themselves a psychotherapist, but if you call yourself a counselling psychologist without being one you are breaking the law and open to prosecution. It is state regulated with a core set of agreed standards (like medicine and nursing), whereas psychotherapy regulation is commonly optional/voluntary. These in turn lead to higher pay, NHS recognition and other advantages that Nerol talks about.

Hope that helps
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