loazing21
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#1
I want to join the British army as an officer in the RE however since I'm not a commonwealth or British citizen I can't. Should I leave my US citenzship for a British one? Is it worth it?
P. S. My parents don't want me to give up my American citizenship as they think I'll have better job opportunities there, probs true but I don't really care about money that much to relocate my entire life.
0
reply
username2393237
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 year ago
#2
How long have you lived in the UK? Can you have dual citizenship? I don’t know much about it.
0
reply
Bogelles
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#3
Report 1 year ago
#3
ngl the British army is significantly better than the US army when it comes to actually being in it and the training and general atmosphere and everything, the US army is just a mass soldier spam with people screaming and being all ooo armerica look how free we are blah blah blah

biased af view but yno what I mean, don't listen to your parents either they are biased (I realise thats incredibly hypocritical lmao)

anyway to actually answer the question

Yes and no, if you can be a dual citizen and that will work then go for it if not then yeah go for the British citizenship when you can. I would recommend you go to a recruitment centre and ask about this or they might have online services where you can ask about it, I know the royal navy do at least so I would presume the British army would as well
0
reply
Drewski
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 year ago
#4
I believe if you maintain a US citizenship you owe taxes to the US regardless of where you're employed.

So, you'll get hit twice on every month's wage packet, which will be fun.


As for your question about Army officer, while you can become a British citizen, there are residency rules as well. You'll have had to live in the UK for a minimum amount of time before you're eligible (typically 3-5 years, I think).
Last edited by Drewski; 1 year ago
0
reply
username4347578
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#5
Report 1 year ago
#5
Try to get a british citizenship that way you’ll keep the American one too. Then you can decide in the future if you’ll keep one or not since I’m guessing you’re kinda young?
0
reply
loazing21
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#6
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#6
(Original post by YaliaV)
How long have you lived in the UK? Can you have dual citizenship? I don’t know much about it.
there is no dual citenzship between the US and UK unfortuantely.I have been living in the UK for at least 14 years.Both my parents and my brothers are citizens.
0
reply
LeapingLucy
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#7
Report 1 year ago
#7
(Original post by loazing21)
there is no dual citenzship between the US and UK unfortuantely.I have been living in the UK for at least 14 years.Both my parents and my brothers are citizens.
Yes there is. I know loads of dual UK-US citizens.

Our own Prime Minister used to be a dual British-American citizen until only a few years ago when he chose to give up his US citizenship.
Last edited by LeapingLucy; 1 year ago
3
reply
LatexLover
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#8
Report 1 year ago
#8
(Original post by loazing21)
I want to join the British army as an officer in the RE however since I'm not a commonwealth or British citizen I can't. Should I leave my US citenzship for a British one? Is it worth it?
P. S. My parents don't want me to give up my American citizenship as they think I'll have better job opportunities there, probs true but I don't really care about money that much to relocate my entire life.
the way the UK is going i think you will regret dropping your US Citizenship, can you not go dual nationality
0
reply
loazing21
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#9
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#9
(Original post by Drewski)
I believe if you maintain a US citizenship you owe taxes to the US regardless of where you're employed.

So, you'll get hit twice on every month's wage packet, which will be fun.


As for your question about Army officer, while you can become a British citizen, there are residency rules as well. You'll have had to live in the UK for a minimum amount of time before you're eligible (typically 3-5 years, I think).
Been living here for around 14 years, so residency rules wont be a problem. Are you sure about the double taxes? That seems way too extreme plus why would i have to pay taxes to the us when im not using any of the public services or benefits.
0
reply
LeapingLucy
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#10
Report 1 year ago
#10
(Original post by loazing21)
Been living here for around 14 years, so residency rules wont be a problem. Are you sure about the double taxes? That seems way too extreme plus why would i have to pay taxes to the us when im not using any of the public services or benefits.
As far as I understand, you only have to pay US income taxes when your income reaches a certain level, but you have to file a federal US tax return every single year.

Also, the US can make a claim on any substantial sum of money you inherit or win.

Boris Johnson gave up his US citizenship specifically because of the US double taxes.
0
reply
Drewski
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#11
Report 1 year ago
#11
(Original post by loazing21)
Been living here for around 14 years, so residency rules wont be a problem. Are you sure about the double taxes? That seems way too extreme plus why would i have to pay taxes to the us when im not using any of the public services or benefits.
Yep, it's punitive
0
reply
loazing21
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#12
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#12
(Original post by LeapingLucy)
As far as I understand, you only have to pay US income taxes when your income reaches a certain level, but you have to file a federal US tax return every single year.

Also, the US can make a claim on any substantial sum of money you inherit or win.

Boris Johnson gave up his US citizenship specifically because of the US double taxes.
can you send me a link to a webiste that shows how to get dual citenzship between US/UK i can't find anything online.
0
reply
Drewski
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#13
Report 1 year ago
#13
(Original post by loazing21)
can you send me a link to a webiste that shows how to get dual citenzship between US/UK i can't find anything online.
https://www.gov.uk/dual-citizenship
0
reply
LeapingLucy
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#14
Report 1 year ago
#14
(Original post by loazing21)
can you send me a link to a webiste that shows how to get dual citenzship between US/UK i can't find anything online.
You just apply for UK citizenship. You don’t need to apply specifically for ‘dual’ citizenship - the process is the same regardless of whether you already have another citizenship.

Both the UK and US allow dual citizenship, so there is no problem there at all.
0
reply
LeapingLucy
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#15
Report 1 year ago
#15
https://www.gov.uk/apply-citizenship...n/how-to-apply
0
reply
mnot
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#16
Report 1 year ago
#16
(Original post by Drewski)
I believe if you maintain a US citizenship you owe taxes to the US regardless of where you're employed.

So, you'll get hit twice on every month's wage packet, which will be fun.


As for your question about Army officer, while you can become a British citizen, there are residency rules as well. You'll have had to live in the UK for a minimum amount of time before you're eligible (typically 3-5 years, I think).
Yes this is true, you still technically owe US federal taxes but there is the Foreign tax credit, if you pay foreign taxes you dont have to pay US taxes if they offset (in the UK taxes are much higher). You still have to file a tax return but you will end up paying 0.

OP:
you can look at dual-citizenship, although I do believe the US has harder rules on it, but UK & US is possible.
0
reply
RogerOxon
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#17
Report 1 year ago
#17
(Original post by loazing21)
I want to join the British army as an officer in the RE however since I'm not a commonwealth or British citizen I can't. Should I leave my US citenzship for a British one? Is it worth it?
P. S. My parents don't want me to give up my American citizenship as they think I'll have better job opportunities there, probs true but I don't really care about money that much to relocate my entire life.
Some of the information on this thread is wrong - the devil is in the detail.

I hold both UK (birth) and US citizenship, and have dealt with dual taxation issues. You are liable for tax on your worldwide income in the US, but, should your country of residence have a dual taxation agreement with the US, will get a foreign tax credit on your US tax return(s). Whilst the US typically has lower tax than many other developed countries, there are issues with transactions that are tax efficient in your country of residence, but not the US. This is especially problematic for large transactions, e.g.:

- Sale of primary residence (if single, you only get $250k of gain tax free under US taxation, in the UK it's exempt from CGT)
- Share option schemes
- ISAs (UK tax efficient accounts, but no tax advantages in the US)
- Pensions (I've yet to get into this, but I expect to pay ..)

If you're going to give up your US citizenship, it's probably best to do it before you have significant assets - you may have to pay tax before you can otherwise. However, I would urge you to get professional advice, or research it in-depth yourself. It's a big step that closes a lot of doors.
Last edited by RogerOxon; 1 year ago
1
reply
RogerOxon
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#18
Report 1 year ago
#18
(Original post by LeapingLucy)
Also, the US can make a claim on any substantial sum of money you inherit or win.
The US does not tax inherited money - they tax the estate, when in their jurisdiction. However, there's quite a high limit (over $11m) before tax is due.

Lottery winnings are taxed by the US - so that 'tax free' sum, isn't.
Last edited by RogerOxon; 1 year ago
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Do you think receiving Teacher Assessed Grades will impact your future?

I'm worried it will negatively impact me getting into university/college (74)
38.14%
I'm worried that I’m not academically prepared for the next stage in my educational journey (19)
9.79%
I'm worried it will impact my future career (12)
6.19%
I'm worried that my grades will be seen as ‘lesser’ because I didn’t take exams (48)
24.74%
I don’t think that receiving these grades will impact my future (25)
12.89%
I think that receiving these grades will affect me in another way (let us know in the discussion!) (16)
8.25%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise