killerspeedforce
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I have just started studying and plan to do 6 hours of revision every day. Do you think I have any hope of getting All 8s and 9s in my GCSEs if I study non stop, no break, even on Christmas and Boxing day?
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lancpe2002
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(Original post by killerspeedforce)
I have just started studying and plan to do 6 hours of revision every day. Do you think I have any hope of getting All 8s and 9s in my GCSEs if I study non stop, no break, even on Christmas and Boxing day?
I would say yes, although it is completely realistic to don't take a single day off for such a long period of time (I am in Y13 and I revise around 5-6 h after school in weekdays and 10-11h in weekends) as there are too many factors out of tour control. Keep in mind also to do all the relevant exam technique and especially not to either lose motivation or burnout.

Best of luck
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A_J_B
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(Original post by killerspeedforce)
I have just started studying and plan to do 6 hours of revision every day. Do you think I have any hope of getting All 8s and 9s in my GCSEs if I study non stop, no break, even on Christmas and Boxing day?
It is not about the hours. It's your ability to reflect on (silly) mistakes you may be making so that you stop making them. If you burnout, it may negatively affect your importance. Take some time out to relax, play some sport (playing basketball really helped when I was doing A-Levels) and use your free time to do something enjoyable yet constructive.
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Compost
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Don't be stupid. This is the way to a breakdown. There is no need to study that much to get 8s and 9s.
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Bashir_GCSE
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(Original post by killerspeedforce)
I have just started studying and plan to do 6 hours of revision every day. Do you think I have any hope of getting All 8s and 9s in my GCSEs if I study non stop, no break, even on Christmas and Boxing day?
I am in year 11 and I study 3-4 hours a day. I think 6 is overboard as your brain will not be able to process all that information. I space 3-4 hours in 1 hour chunks.
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Racsoix
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(Original post by killerspeedforce)
I have just started studying and plan to do 6 hours of revision every day. Do you think I have any hope of getting All 8s and 9s in my GCSEs if I study non stop, no break, even on Christmas and Boxing day?
(Original post by lancpe2002)
I would say yes, although it is completely realistic to don't take a single day off for such a long period of time (I am in Y13 and I revise around 5-6 h after school in weekdays and 10-11h in weekends) as there are too many factors out of tour control. Keep in mind also to do all the relevant exam technique and especially not to either lose motivation or burnout.

Best of luck
Both of you are doing ridiculous amounts of work. Y13 is obviously more excusable but 6 hours per night? You study non-stop after school until bed time? This, for both Y11 and Y13, just seems like the fastest way to burn out and become depressed. Revision is important but it's about how effectively you revise, not for how long. I don't understand how you can be productive for such long periods of time each day. Perhaps when I reach Y13 I will understand that, but certainly in Y11 it's inexcusable. You won't keep 6 hours per day up, and you can certainly achieve "all 8s and 9s" with not even half that amount of revision.

I mean.. 6 hours on Christmas day? Seriously? Go and spend some time with family and friends. I guarantee you will be happier.
Last edited by Racsoix; 4 months ago
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SteveObolowongai
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(Original post by lancpe2002)
I would say yes, although it is completely realistic to don't take a single day off for such a long period of time (I am in Y13 and I revise around 5-6 h after school in weekdays and 10-11h in weekends) as there are too many factors out of tour control. Keep in mind also to do all the relevant exam technique and especially not to either lose motivation or burnout.

Best of luck
Rest in peace to both of your social lives. Revision is important but is it worth losing all your friends over?
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lancpe2002
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(Original post by Racsoix)
Both of you are doing ridiculous amounts of work. Y13 is obviously more excusable but 6 hours per night? You study non-stop after school until bed time? This, for both Y11 and Y13, just seems like the fastest way to burn out and become depressed. Revision is important but it's about how effectively you revise, not for how long. I don't understand how you can be productive for such long periods of time each day. Perhaps when I reach Y13 I will understand that, but certainly in Y11 it's inexcusable. You won't keep 6 hours per day up, and you can certainly achieve "all 8s and 9s" with not even half that amount of revision.

I mean.. 6 hours on Christmas day? Seriously? Go and spend some time with family and friends. I guarantee you will be happier.
(Original post by SteveObolowongai)
Rest in peace to both of your social lives. Revision is important but is it worth losing all your friends over?
Well, I do understand that it may seems quite a lot, but really, it is just a question of time management: 12h in weekends would still leave 12hours free each day, if you assume you sleep around 7 (I sleep 6 as I prefer to have one extra hour off) you would still have 5 hours for all your other commitments and still a bit of free time, at least 1-2 from my personal experience. I still manage with this schedule to go tot the gym 3/4 times a week without any issue, so I would say it is absolutely manageable as long as you don't waste time. Of course, I do take an evening off once a month and 1/2 full days every 3 months, just to make sure not to burnout. About mental health, well, I found that mine has improved since I started with this schedule at the beginning of Y12 although this rather subjective. Regarding my social life, I would say it is important when you got exams to give yourself a set of priorities, but this doesn't mean to don't talk to anybody in school all day long. As a result, I'm not saying that anybody should follow this sorts of schedules, but this may be a good idea if you aim to top grades and you start especially from a disadvantaged position, such as someone that has studies in English as his/her second language (such as in my case), although the most important thing when it comes to any type of high performance is balance, as for some this sort of schedule may be counter-productive and especially at GCSE level someone with a strong preparation may need to do 4-5 hours instead of 6/12.

Anyway, regarding Christmas, I did actually 5:30 instead of 12 last year and I can assure I still managed to have lunch with my parents
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Racsoix
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(Original post by lancpe2002)
Well, I do understand that it may seems quite a lot, but really, it is just a question of time management: 12h in weekends would still leave 12hours free each day, if you assume you sleep around 7 (I sleep 6 as I prefer to have one extra hour off) you would still have 5 hours for all your other commitments and still a bit of free time, at least 1-2 from my personal experience. I still manage with this schedule to go tot the gym 3/4 times a week without any issue, so I would say it is absolutely manageable as long as you don't waste time. Of course, I do take an evening off once a month and 1/2 full days every 3 months, just to make sure not to burnout. About mental health, well, I found that mine has improved since I started with this schedule at the beginning of Y12 although this rather subjective. Regarding my social life, I would say it is important when you got exams to give yourself a set of priorities, but this doesn't mean to don't talk to anybody in school all day long. As a result, I'm not saying that anybody should follow this sorts of schedules, but this may be a good idea if you aim to top grades and you start especially from a disadvantaged position, such as someone that has studies in English as his/her second language (such as in my case), although the most important thing when it comes to any type of high performance is balance, as for some this sort of schedule may be counter-productive and especially at GCSE level someone with a strong preparation may need to do 4-5 hours instead of 6/12.

Anyway, regarding Christmas, I did actually 5:30 instead of 12 last year and I can assure I still managed to have lunch with my parents
I see where you're coming from of course, and each to their own when it comes to revision. Personally, I could never manage half a days worth of revision on weekends but that's just me. If you can balance a social life, the gym, family time and revision then that's absolutely good for you and I salute you. I think the problem occurs when people judge how effective revision is by time spent doing said revision when really this isn't the case. If it's 12 hours or so of solid revision (presumably with breaks in-between!) then more power to you though. I suppose it really is about time management and how you divide your day. When you think about that extra 4/5 hours on top of work and sleep it doesn't seem to bad all of a sudden but it's all a matter of perspective I suppose. Good luck with your A levels anyway; I'm sure you'll smash them with that revision schedule.

Can't miss Christmas lunch/dinner!
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mpaprika
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I got 11 A*s in the summer and I didn't revise that much, it's how you revise, not how much
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username5036440
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(Original post by lancpe2002)
I would say yes, although it is completely realistic to don't take a single day off for such a long period of time (I am in Y13 and I revise around 5-6 h after school in weekdays and 10-11h in weekends) as there are too many factors out of tour control. Keep in mind also to do all the relevant exam technique and especially not to either lose motivation or burnout.

Best of luck
Well done for making good use of your time!
Can I just ask, what is your response to the argument that doing this much revision could lead to a burn out? I had plans to do similar amount of revision (in terms of time), however I keep allowing myself use the 'burn out' argument as an excuse to do very little revision.
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lancpe2002
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(Original post by Racsoix)
I see where you're coming from of course, and each to their own when it comes to revision. Personally, I could never manage half a days worth of revision on weekends but that's just me. If you can balance a social life, the gym, family time and revision then that's absolutely good for you and I salute you. I think the problem occurs when people judge how effective revision is by time spent doing said revision when really this isn't the case. If it's 12 hours or so of solid revision (presumably with breaks in-between!) then more power to you though. I suppose it really is about time management and how you divide your day. When you think about that extra 4/5 hours on top of work and sleep it doesn't seem to bad all of a sudden but it's all a matter of perspective I suppose. Good luck with your A levels anyway; I'm sure you'll smash them with that revision schedule.

Can't miss Christmas lunch/dinner!
Thank you , I definitely agree with you, the issue it's that many have a distorted idea of what 'revision time' means with the result that they fall in the trap of thinking of having done 6 hours of work while I fact they did a little more than a half of that. I personally try to don't count pauses (when I use my phone or I am on this forum for instance) as revision time, instead, I try to use either a stopwatch or a timer to see how much work I have done. Good luck with A-Levels too, I am sure you'll great too!
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lancpe2002
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(Original post by Numb & Dumb)
Well done for making good use of your time!
Can I just ask, what is your response to the argument that doing this much revision could lead to a burn out? I had plans to do similar amount of revision (in terms of time), however I keep allowing myself use the 'burn out' argument as an excuse to do very little revision.
Thank you! regarding the burnout risk, I would say that the argument ultimately comes down to 2 things in order to avoid it when doing substantial amount of revision: mental equilibrium and self-awareness.

I think it is important to set clear, attainable goals at the beginning of each day of work accompanied by the developing of the right level of mindfulness. This is because, as I believe, burnouts creep in when you feel overwhelmed and stressed due to unattainable goals and high levels of stress. If you can manage to find the your own routine and stick to it, you will probably be able to avoid it. I think setting a weekly productivity goal can help with it.

About the second point, it is also important to recognise your own limits and respect the signals your body is sending to you. In this case, it is key to recognise when you are giving too much and you need to take a couple of hours or even a couple of days off. In fact, as you will surely know, A-Levels are a marathon, not a sprint: it is better to do 8-9h a day of solid, productive revision especially in this stage of the year rather than very demanding loads (like 100+ a week or 13+h a dayi including time spent in school lessons) that are unsustainable in the long term. As mpaprika said, it is mainly about quality, not quantity, and low-productivity heavy workloads are counter-productive mentally, physically and in terms of results as well.

Apart from this, I can say from my personal experience that if it is properly managed, it is possible to follow a demanding routing without burntout, as long as you keep the right equilibrium and you 'recharge your batteries' once in a while while your body requires it.

Best of luck with your A-Levels and university applications! (and good revision )
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username5036440
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(Original post by lancpe2002)
Thank you! regarding the burnout risk, I would say that the argument ultimately comes down to 2 things in order to avoid it when doing substantial amount of revision: mental equilibrium and self-awareness.

I think it is important to set clear, attainable goals at the beginning of each day of work accompanied by the developing of the right level of mindfulness. This is because, as I believe, burnouts creep in when you feel overwhelmed and stressed due to unattainable goals and high levels of stress. If you can manage to find the your own routine and stick to it, you will probably be able to avoid it. I think setting a weekly productivity goal can help with it.

About the second point, it is also important to recognise your own limits and respect the signals your body is sending to you. In this case, it is key to recognise when you are giving too much and you need to take a couple of hours or even a couple of days off. In fact, as you will surely know, A-Levels are a marathon, not a sprint: it is better to do 8-9h a day of solid, productive revision especially in this stage of the year rather than very demanding loads (like 100+ a week or 13+h a dayi including time spent in school lessons) that are unsustainable in the long term. As mpaprika said, it is mainly about quality, not quantity, and low-productivity heavy workloads are counter-productive mentally, physically and in terms of results as well.

Apart from this, I can say from my personal experience that if it is properly managed, it is possible to follow a demanding routing without burntout, as long as you keep the right equilibrium and you 'recharge your batteries' once in a while while your body requires it.

Best of luck with your A-Levels and university applications! (and good revision )
A really reassuring reply. Thank you for this!

I just find it very troubling when others instantly mention burning out as a downside to a rigorous study plan. It often psyches me out.

Good luck to you too!
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Racsoix
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(Original post by lancpe2002)
Thank you , I definitely agree with you, the issue it's that many have a distorted idea of what 'revision time' means with the result that they fall in the trap of thinking of having done 6 hours of work while I fact they did a little more than a half of that. I personally try to don't count pauses (when I use my phone or I am on this forum for instance) as revision time, instead, I try to use either a stopwatch or a timer to see how much work I have done. Good luck with A-Levels too, I am sure you'll great too!
Yes indeed, I agree! Quality is certainly more important than quantity when it comes to revision. Thank you as well!
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ApexCoder
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With all due respect, the fact that you have to ask such a stupid question just amazes me. Do some self evaluation.
Let's be realistic, if you were to study 6 hours straight, without a break, you'll probably be likely to get 98%-100% on every GCSE exam. A better question would be that you have the self-discipline and motivation to do it.
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killerspeedforce
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(Original post by killerspeedforce)
I have just started studying and plan to do 6 hours of revision every day. Do you think I have any hope of getting All 8s and 9s in my GCSEs if I study non stop, no break, even on Christmas and Boxing day?
I go to a private school, and I am predicted 8/9 in every subject. I do 11 btw. Haven't done much revision last year, but somehow got all 6s and a level 8 in Geography, with no revision and a level 9 in maths (we finished normal IGCSE maths, now doing Further Maths) with no revision as well (Y10 Summer exams). Any hope for me? Level 6 is just base level for me, without any revision, level 9 achievable. My teachers say that I am very intelligent, but just cba to do work.
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killerspeedforce
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(Original post by SteveObolowongai)
Rest in peace to both of your social lives. Revision is important but is it worth losing all your friends over?
Yeah, revision is more important than friends. Eventually, I will cut off from my friends when I go to university anyway. Friends aren't forever. That is the sad truth.
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kanako231
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(Original post by killerspeedforce)
I have just started studying and plan to do 6 hours of revision every day. Do you think I have any hope of getting All 8s and 9s in my GCSEs if I study non stop, no break, even on Christmas and Boxing day?
Pls don't otherwise you will make me look like ****
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