The Jeremy Corbyn interview Watch

ColinDent
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How do you feel that his interview with Andrew Neil went tonight?
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Jammy Duel
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Well it was a good piece of comedy, even if he struggled to answer any of the questions.
How will he pay for the waspis? He will pay for it because we should!
Will he borrow to nationalise? No, he will issue more bonds (borrow)
Was it three or 4 times being asked before accepting the Rothschild thing is an anti-semitic trope?
Complaining he wasn't being asked the questions he wanted to be asked
And of course a typical left answer to the "problem" or Married Person's Allowance, instead of extending the tax relief to those who don't have it we should instead impose a £250 tax hike on low earners who are married.
Last edited by Jammy Duel; 1 week ago
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barnetlad
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I gave it a miss. I find Andrew Neil's style of interviewing not very good, and in any case I am not going to be voting Labour.
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Zarek
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You're never really going to win with Andrew. A few of the same old 'imagine you had a terrorist cornered' questions. I thought he generally answered well and particularly on the anti semitism. Obfuscated a bit too long on the Waspi women. Looking forward to seeing how Johnson fares, if he has the heart to go for it.
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ColinDent
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(Original post by Zarek)
You're never really going to win with Andrew. A few of the same old 'imagine you had a terrorist cornered' questions. I thought he generally answered well and particularly on the anti semitism. Obfuscated a bit too long on the Waspi women. Looking forward to seeing how Johnson fares, if he has the heart to go for it.
Oh I agree that Mr Johnson will also struggle but Mr Corbyn came across terribly, that was a car crash of Diane Abbott proportions.
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Zarek
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(Original post by ColinDent)
Oh I agree that Mr Johnson will also struggle but Mr Corbyn came across terribly, that was a car crash of Diane Abbott proportions.
Can't agree with you on that. He did look a bit knackered though.
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Patagonia
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Jeremy's deflated look at the end said it all really.

The amount of times he said "Andrew..." as his frustration grew at being interrupted.
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Jammy Duel
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(Original post by barnetlad)
I gave it a miss. I find Andrew Neil's style of interviewing not very good, and in any case I am not going to be voting Labour.
Is that because his style is to keep asking until the question is answered instead of letting the interviewee trail off and answer the question they want to answer?
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Jammy Duel
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(Original post by Zarek)
You're never really going to win with Andrew. A few of the same old 'imagine you had a terrorist cornered' questions. I thought he generally answered well and particularly on the anti semitism. Obfuscated a bit too long on the Waspi women. Looking forward to seeing how Johnson fares, if he has the heart to go for it.
He answered well on antisemitism? It took 4 attempts to get him to accept the Rothschild comment was an anti-semitic trope. The way you deal with Neil is pretty simple: you just answer the question instead of trying to answer the question you want.
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QE2
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(Original post by ColinDent)
Oh I agree that Mr Johnson will also struggle but Mr Corbyn came across terribly, that was a car crash of Diane Abbott proportions.
On the other hand, I thought he dealt with Neil's ridiculous and irrelevant berating rather well and came across a bit like a patient parent dealing with a child having a tantrum.
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QE2
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(Original post by Patagonia)
Jeremy's deflated look at the end said it all really.

The amount of times he said "Andrew..." as his frustration grew at being interrupted.
He looked like an exasperated parent dealing with a child's tantrum. I'm surprised he didn't say "Ask me a proper question or you can go you your room!"
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QE2
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(Original post by Jammy Duel)
Is that because his style is to keep asking until the question is answered instead of letting the interviewee trail off and answer the question they want to answer?
What kind of a question is "Will you apologise the the Jewish community for anti-semitism?"
And why did he spend half of the interview repeating it, even after Corbyn had repeatedly answered it?

Then there was the "would you kill a terrorist if you didn't have to?" one. I think he may have been drinking.
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fallen_acorns
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(Original post by QE2)
On the other hand, I thought he dealt with Neil's ridiculous and irrelevant berating rather well and came across a bit like a patient parent dealing with a child having a tantrum.
I haven't watched it yet - I will tonight when I'm home. But you seem to be going against the consensus there. From what I'm seeing, and not just from boris' fan-girl papers, is that his performance hasn't gone down terribly well. Not a disaster, and it won't be a key moment, but he certainly didn't do well or give a performance that will boost his campaign. Even left-wing papers and comentators are politely describing it as a 'difficult' evening for corbyn.

The comfort for me though is that Neil is one of the few ********s who is an equal-offending ********. He was pretty awful to Sturgeon in their interview, and I do believe he will be just the same with Boris, and that could be far worse because Boris has plenty of things that are pretty indefensible, and against someone as stuborn and dickish as neil who will keep interupting and asking and not letting it rest, I can't see it going well for Bojo.
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Reality Check
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(Original post by fallen_acorns)
I haven't watched it yet - I will tonight when I'm home. But you seem to be going against the consensus there. From what I'm seeing, and not just from boris' fan-girl papers, is that his performance hasn't gone down terribly well. Not a disaster, and it won't be a key moment, but he certainly didn't do well.

The comfort for me though is that Neil is one of the few ********s who is an equal-offending ********. He was pretty awful to Sturgeon in their interview, and I do believe he will be just the same with Boris, and that could be far worse because Boris has plenty of things that are pretty indefensible, and against someone as stuborn and dickish as neil who will keep interupting and asking and not letting it rest, I can't see it going well for Bojo.
It was pretty disastrous.

He missed a golden opportunity to capitalise on his relative successes in previous television appearances. All he needed to do was say 'sorry'. But he didn't. He wriggled and writhed and evaded and acted too much like a professional politician. All he needed to do was say sorry sincerely for what Labour had done, or not done. But he didn't - and what will be remembered is that he was offered four times to apologise and he didn't.

I actually think this has damaged him quite seriously. Not with voters who'd already made their minds up about the man, but those who were still considering him. The antisemitism, the spraying money around, the Brexit position... it just comes across as a risk. He also triggers memories of the 70s for too many people over the age of about 50.

Such a shame we don't have a credible opposition, but once Labour lose this election (relatively badly, I suspect) then at least it will have to be an end to this failed Corbyn project and Labour can get back to something a bit more centre-left and electable.
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ColinDent
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(Original post by Reality Check)
It was pretty disastrous.

He missed a golden opportunity to capitalise on his relative successes in previous television appearances. All he needed to do was say 'sorry'. But he didn't. He wriggled and writhed and evaded and acted too much like a professional politician. All he needed to do was say sorry sincerely for what Labour had done, or not done. But he didn't - and what will be remembered is that he was offered four times to apologise and he didn't.

I actually think this has damaged him quite seriously. Not with voters who'd already made their minds up about the man, but those who were still considering him. The antisemitism, the spraying money around, the Brexit position... it just comes across as a risk. He also triggers memories of the 70s for too many people over the age of about 50.

Such a shame we don't have a credible opposition, but once Labour lose this election (relatively badly, I suspect) then at least it will have to be an end to this failed Corbyn project and Labour can get back to something a bit more centre-left and electable.
I couldn't agree more.
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Trinculo
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(Original post by Reality Check)
Such a shame we don't have a credible opposition, but once Labour lose this election (relatively badly, I suspect) then at least it will have to be an end to this failed Corbyn project and Labour can get back to something a bit more centre-left and electable.
The hard-left has full control of the party. There's nothing to suggest that if Labour lose (a) there will be a centre-left successor, or (b) Corbyn will even resign.
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Reality Check
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(Original post by Trinculo)
The hard-left has full control of the party. There's nothing to suggest that if Labour lose (a) there will be a centre-left successor, or (b) Corbyn will even resign.
I don't believe that the centre left has just vanished like the morning mist. They're still around. I think they're probably biding their time, waiting to strike. Corbyn losing yet another election due to his extreme positions on things is surely the right time for them.

I don't think he will resign, I agree. He'll have to be pushed, rather than being encouraged to jump.
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Trinculo
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(Original post by Reality Check)
I don't believe that the centre left has just vanished like the morning mist. They're still around. I think they're probably biding their time, waiting to strike. Corbyn losing yet another election due to his extreme positions on things is surely the right time for them.

I don't think he will resign, I agree. He'll have to be pushed, rather than being encouraged to jump.
Of course the centre-left hasn't vanished - they just have no control of the party. The way Labour is structured, it's almost impossible for them to gain any traction and either get rid of Corbyn, or have a non-lunatic as leader. It's nailed on that no matter what happens in the next GE, the Labour Leader in 2020 will be from the militant hard left. It will be one of McDonnell, Long-Bailey, or Rayner. Thornberry is also a possibility.

As for Corbyn not leaving - the only circumstances I see that happening are if he feels tired of it and no longer wants it - weighed against his burning desire for Marxist Revolution. Let's not forget he lost a VONC by a massive, massive majority and simply ignored it. If he doesn't want to go, no one will make him. The Corbyn Project is not and never has been about winning power. It's about ideological purity of the Labour Party.

The centre-left in Labour is far far too weak to move against the hard-left. Apart from anything else, they have lost a lot of their key people in retirements, resignations and defections to the Lib Dems. A lot of those that are left like Kier Starmer and Cooper are really, really damaged by their allegience to Corbyn through all this.
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silent ninja
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The hard right (conservatives) are the alternative option. I can't think of anything worse. Thatcherism is back in full force.

The press are far more forgiving of Boris. He's a complete liar- he's betrayed his colleagues, constituents, and even family on a daily basis. The Islamophobia in the party is inherent, but we see much more focus on labour and antisemitism (labour aren't in government remember). Jews are not a monolithic bunch and it smells of an organised attack by certain Jewish groups that want Palestine eradicated. Note many orthodox Jews are supportive of two state peaceful solution, as Corbyn supports. Preeti Patel and her ilk are pro Israeli, pro war, pro arms selling in comparison, so it's no surprise why Corbyn is under attack - he's more principled on the matter.

The electorate are stuck between a rock and a hard place. Labour can at least reverse some of the damage of the last 9 years. But is that enough?
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Wired_1800
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(Original post by ColinDent)
How do you feel that his interview with Andrew Neil went tonight?
I found it ok. I liked Corbyn’s calm and considered approach and his responses were fine with me.

Andrew Neil is decent but I dont think he is interested in truth but controversy. He sticks with points that will result with headlines rather than focusing on the details.
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