My school cancelled computer science. Is there a solution?

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Perspectxve
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So I've been programming since I was about 8 and I'm fluent in both Python and Lua and I'm studying Java Script now. I'm a year 10 student so I'm 1 year in to my GCSE subjects. I originally applied for Computer Science, but my school cancelled it due to a shortage of staff. I've always wanted to pursue a career in software engineering, but I'm worried that I won't be able to study at a specialist college or go to university because I don't have a GCSE in computer science. I'm really worried that my school has messed up my whole life and I don't know what to do. Can I still get in to a college to study computer science? Is there any way I can still take the GCSE? I'm pretty much clueless. Please help.
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JXN
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All you need is Mathematics at GCSE and Alevel, for computer science)

(of course, Computer science at GCSE/Alevel is a plus, but it does not matter at all - literally)

Do well in maths (especially at alevel) and you can get any offer at any university and any sixth form. But of course do well - overall as well.

And, you’ve been learning programming in your own time - this’ll be very useful to put on your personal statement. But again, all you need is maths really and the minimum requirements.
Last edited by JXN; 1 year ago
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winterscoming
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You only really need A-Level maths for getting into "top 20" universities where Computer Science is focused more on maths topics, although universities outside of those tend not to have any strong subject requirements: https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=5007920
Otherwise, most universities are quite relaxed about your background, as long as you've got at least some STEM background (and a B/6 in GCSE maths).

People joining the first year of a computer science degree at university often haven't studied it before nor written any code, so universities make the assumption that everyone is completely new to programming from the first lecture, nearly always teaching everything from basic principles (i.e. first week is "Hello world", learning basic input/output, writing programs using basic arithmetic, etc.)


Also, if you're still committed to software engineering as a career after you finish A-Levels, then you can earn a degree through apprenticeships instead - those are a really good option if you've got a strong programming background since employers care a lot more about your programming skills and a lot less about your qualifications compared with universities. - Universities look for people who are academically minded and able to study hard for exams, whereas apprenticeships are all about learning through real-world work experience, real projects, solving problems, etc - so the companies who hire apprentices place alot more importance on hiring people who can prove that they're able to write code and solve problems regardless of GCSEs or A-Levels.
Last edited by winterscoming; 1 year ago
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_gcx
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You also have the option to self-teach if you can find someone to mark centre assessed components.
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